Guide to the Records of Congregation Shearith Israel, undated, 1755-1996
 
*I-4

Processed by Adina Anflick

American Jewish Historical Society

Center for Jewish History

15 West 16th Street

New York, N.Y. 10011

Phone: (212) 294-6160

Fax: (212) 294-6161

Email: reference@ajhs.org

URL: http://www.ajhs.org

© 2014, American Jewish Historical Society, Boston, MA and New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.
Finding aid was encoded by Marvin Rusinek on March 30, 2006. Description is in English.

Descriptive Summary

Creator: Congregation Shearith Israel
Title: Congregation Shearith Israel, Records
Dates: undated, 1755-1996
Abstract: Contains published and manuscript material relating to the activities and administration of the congregation and its subsidiary organizations including reports and weekly bulletins, early financial records and lists of those honored at religious services, copies of resolutions and forms of service and prayers for various occasions in manuscript form. Contains also material relating to the cemetery photographs, the Hebra Hased Va-Amet (the congregational burial society) and to later clergy in the congregation, Henry Pereira Mendes, David de Sola Pool and Louis Coleman Gerstein including published copies of their sermons.
Languages: The collection is predominantly in English, with some Hebrew, Portuguese, and Dutch.
Quantity: 5 linear feet (10 manuscript boxes); 2 oversized folders; 1 MAP folder
Identification: I-4
Repository: American Jewish Historical Society
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Historical Note - Congregation Shearith Israel
portrait of Congregation Shearith Israel

Congregation Shearith Israel (1654-)

This historical sketch is divided into the following subject headings: Founding Congregation; First Mill Street Synagogue; Revolutionary War; Kashrut; Charity; Children's Education; Second Mill Street Synagogue; Crosby Street Synagogue until Today; Prayer Books; Religious Leadership; Involvement in New York Jewish Institutions; Women's Work Pre-Sisterhood; Shearith Israel Sisterhood; Shearith Israel League; Adult Education; Cemeteries; and List of Ministers.

Founding Congregation
The history of the oldest congregation in the United States is intertwined with the United States' first settlement of Jews. The first Jew to come to the New World was most probably Louis de Torres, a Marrano, who accompanied Christopher Columbus on his exploration, in order to interpret the assumed ancient tongue Hebrew for the natives.1 More adventurers, who either stayed or continued their journeys, followed. The arrival of twenty-three penniless men, women, and children in 1654 marked the first settlement of Jews. From this "Remnant of Israel," a congregation was born, named "Shearith Israel."

This small group gratefully arrived in New Amsterdam having suffered an exile and being stranded by pirates. Years before, they had settled in Brazil when the Dutch overtook the Portuguese in the country in 1630. The Portuguese reconquered Brazil in 1654, and gave the Dutch Jewish families, which amounted to several hundred, three months' amnesty to leave the country. Supplied with sixteen boats, the Dutch Jews fled the Portuguese Inquisition. All but one returned to the safety of Holland. The lost ship fell prey to Spanish pirates, but was rescued by a French Man-of-War and brought eventually to New Amsterdam.2

At last finding refuge, the small group could not yet breathe easily. Held liable by the French captain for their fare, their meager possessions were auctioned off and two of the group were held prisoner. Fortunately, the ship's crew was eager to depart, and finally left after assurances that the Jewish community in Amsterdam would pay off their brethren's debt.3

Jews in Amsterdam held a sizeable interest in the Dutch West India Company, which proved to be a saving grace for the small group. The governor of New Amsterdam, Peter Stuyvesant, disliked non-Calvinists and in addition, did not want any unwelcome charges during the winter. However, Stuyvesant was ordered by the Dutch West India Company on April 26, 1755 to allow the Jews to remain and live in New Netherland, "provided the poor among them shall not become a burden to the Company or to the community, but be supported by their own nation."4

By 1655, there were more than ten Jewish men in the community, fulfilling the required prayer quorum by Jewish law. The group, used to freedom of worship in Amsterdam, was prohibited from holding services publicly. Stuyvesant did grant them one concession; a place to bury their dead. The location of a "little hook of land…outside of this city," bestowed in 1656 for this purpose, remains a mystery.5

When the British overtook New Amsterdam in 1664, they granted Lutherans the right to worship freely. In 1683, the Charter of Liberties, passed by the Colonial Assembly, extended this right to those "who profess Christianity." Jews were allowed to worship publicly by 1692. A description of New York by Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac includes Jews among those who had their own church. In 1695, Rev. John Miller, Chaplain of the Grenadiers in New York, drew a map of the city by memory. His map cites "the Jewes Synagogue" as being on the South side of Beaver Street. A different site, on the north of Mill Street, is described in a real estate document dated in 1700 as a synagogue. This site was rented from John Harperdinck for eight pounds a year and was used for worship until 1728.6

Although the custom of the religious services followed Spanish-Portuguese (Sephardi) practices, there were actually more Eastern European (Ashkenazi) Jews living in New York than Sephardim. The use of a minority's traditions for the synagogue is due partly to the affluence and leadership of the Sephardim and to the appeal their culture had for Ashkenazi Jews. Marc Angel writes, "... They could never have survived unless Ashkenazim were attracted to Sephardic culture. Ashkenazim wanted to be part of the Sephardi community..." Interestingly, the records of Shearith Israel were kept in Portuguese until the early eighteenth century, when an English copy was added to give access for Ashkenazi members.7

First Mill Street Synagogue
The first building erected as a synagogue in the United States was constructed on Mill Street in 1728. The lot, bought from Cornelius and Catherine Copper, cost 100 pounds, one loaf of sugar, and one pound of Bohea tea. The sale was transacted through trustees, since only the Dutch and Episcopal Churches were permitted to incorporate. Bound by "ties of blood and commerce," Jews in Barbados, Boston, Curaçao, Dutch Guiana, Jamaica, and London sent generous donations. Mill Street Synagogue was consecrated on April 8, 1730, and included a mikveh (ritual bath), ladies gallery, and a community center (built in 1731) for use as a school and meeting hall.8

Revolutionary War
The rise of the Revolutionary War allowed Jews to express their desire to be full participants in the New Republic. Jewish patriots, including the Hazzan (congregation reader) Gershom Mendes Seixas, fled to Philadelphia and safer cities once the British overtook New York. The loyalists in the congregation retained the synagogue, conducting religious services when they were able. A special service was held prior to Seixas' flight, in support of the Continental Congress' appeal for a day of fasting and prayer. Seixas incorporated several patriotic prayers once he returned to New York in 1785. Among these prayers was the beginning of Thanksgiving Day Services, in support of George Washington's Thanksgiving Day Proclamation in 1789. Future congregation leaders continued Thanksgiving Day Services, and instituted other new services in response to proclamations by local, state, or national governments, or to memorialize the death of public figures.9

The congregation addressed New York Governor George Clinton in January 1784, writing: "Though the society we belong to is small... we flatter ourselves that none has manifested a more zealous attachment to the sacred cause of America..." Initiated by Shearith Israel, the Jewish congregations in the United States planned to send an address to the new President, George Washington. Although delays led the Savannah and Newport congregations to send addresses separately, four congregations in 1790 made a joint address. The letter was sent by Congregation Mikveh Israel in Philadelphia on behalf of the New York, Philadelphia, Charleston, and Richmond Jewish congregations.10

The effect the Revolutionary War had on religious practice and authority in Shearith Israel was profound. The war had forced Jewish soldiers to desecrate the Sabbath and eat non-kosher food. Punishments for those who were lax in religious observance gradually lessened to nothing after the war.11 Prior to the revolution, the congregation modeled its religious authority on its mother synagogue in Amsterdam, which had practiced excommunication. Early Shearith Israel records display efforts at ostracism as a form of punishment. A record book entry in 1752 states that a Jews who has "absented himself from the synagogue or was no way a benefactor to the congregation, his corpse and those of his family may not be buried within the walls" of the Jewish cemetery unless the Parnass (President) gave his permission. A proclamation read on Yom Kippur in 1757, excommunicated violators of the Sabbath and urged them to repent. Complaints from congregation members led the Parnass and Elders to soften the proclamation the following year, with words such as: "... like faithful shepherds, call into the fold the wandering sheep."12

By 1805, when the currently used constitution and by-laws were drafted, there was no longer any mention of punishment for religious laxity. Laxity was tolerated if made by members. Officers, clergy, and teachers were held in stricter judgment.13

The New Republic also gave power to members of the congregation as representatives of their synagogue government, as can be seen in comparing the constitutions of 1728 and 1761. In 1728, authority was granted solely to the officers: "They may act as their Conscience shall dictate them for the well governing of our said Congregation." In 1761, the officers elected were "... with the authority given them by the said Yechidim (members)." Their duties were outlined specifically for the first time.14

Kashrut
Being the sole Jewish congregation in New York City until 1825, Shearith Israel was the religious authority for the entire Jewish community. The elected officers were responsible for providing kashrut supervision, charity, and children's education.

Kashrut was known to have been available in New York since 1660. That year, Asser Levy and Moses de Lucena were permitted to conduct their business as butchers by the Dutch government. Records indicate that New York exported kosher meat, particularly to Curaçao and Jamaica from 1730 until after the Revolution.15

The congregation still elects a shochet (ritual slaughterer) to perform and supervise kosher meat production. In the early days, the shochet would slaughter animals from non-Jewish butchers, who would then sell the meat in the market with an identification seal made out of lead. When mistakes and sometimes outright deception arose, the Congregation appealed to the City Council. In 1805, Caleb Vandenberg offered unkosher meat for sale that had been identified as kosher. The Mayor revoked Vandenberg's license. When he apologized and promised to obey kashrut laws, Shearith Israel trustees requested that the City restore his license.16

In 1803, trouble arrived in the form of Jacob Abrahams, who was elected that year as the Congregation's shochet. A sharp rift between officers and leading members of Shearith Israel occurred as sides were taken over Abrahams' lack of religious observance and questions concerning his job performance. Abrahams' contract ended in 1813, and he set himself up as an independent shochet, challenging synagogue authority and putting the system of kashrut supervision into the control of individual ritual slaughterers. An appeal made by the congregation to the Mayor briefly stopped Abrahams' activities. Supporters of Abrahams issued a petition to the City, and the previous ordinance was withdrawn. Kashrut supervision was now open to any shochet.17

Charity
The congregation's first organized charitable society is believed to have been around 1758. The minutes mention a Hebra (society) in that year as being permitted to receive synagogue offerings and loans. Previously, the Parnass and Assistants distributed charity. Traveling Jews were given eight shillings for up to twelve weeks, and if need be, passage and kosher food. A system of life pensions was provided for needy members of the congregation. This system is first mentioned in the 1760 minutes, and most likely followed an example set by the London congregation, Shaar Hashamayim. Hyman Grinstein writes: "... The creation of a pension system by Shearith Israel went beyond anything attempted by any mutual aid society in New York and was the most remarkable development in Jewish philanthropy in the city prior to the Civil War."18

The early years show charity being dispensed for visiting Rabbis soliciting funds for overseas communities, refugees from the French Revolution, Jews traveling from the West Indies to other location, Jews who had sold themselves into slavery to pay for their ship passage, and to those victims of epidemics of infectious diseases. As immigration into the United States rose beginning in the 1820s, charitable organizations focused their efforts on assisting immigrants.19

The congregation in July 1802 established the oldest existing Jewish philanthropic organization in New York. Named Hebra Hased Va-Amet (Kindness and Truth Society), it maintains the congregation's cemeteries, helps poor Jews obtain a Jewish burial, and assists other communities who have experienced disasters. Prior to the development of Jewish undertakers and funeral parlors, Hased Va-Amet performed religious burial rites, watched over the dead, and helped those in mourning. Among its most significant contributions to New York has been educating the Jewish community on laws of burial and mourning. A booklet, published in 1827 was used extensively by other funeral societies, and was followed by later publications.20

Other charitable societies were begun by Shearith Israel over the years. Some lost energy and faded away, but others merged with other societies and are still in operation. The Congregation formed the following societies that are no longer in existence: Hebra Gemiluth Hasadim (1785-1790, Society for Dispensing Acts of Kindness) provided financial and medical assistance, visits for the sick, assistance in funerals and help for mourners. Hazzan Gershom Mendes Seixas formed Kalfe Sedaka Mattan Basether (1798-1816, Charity Depositary Gift in Secret) during a yellow fever epidemic, after city residents fled to the suburbs and charity funds needed to be replenished. The society lasted for Seixas' lifetime. Hebra Leezrat Ani Veevyon (1839-?, New York Hebrew Assistance Society), was unique in that all of its funds were completely distributed to poor Jews, versus kept for future needs. The Society was nonetheless able to contribute money for synagogue building repairs in 1841 and for a capital building fund for Jews' Hospital in 1851.21

Societies that have grown and are still operating include Meshibat Nefesh(1822- ) known as the Hebrew Benevolent Society, and grandfather to the Hebrew Orphan Asylum. Founded by Ashkenazi members, it moved its offices to Congregation Bnai Jeshurun, after the Ashkenazi congregation was established in 1825.22

In 1828, Shearith Israel formed Hebra Hinuch Nearim Veezrat Ebyonim, a long title that translates into Society for the Education of Poor Children and Relief of Indigent Persons of the Jewish Persuasion in the City of New York. In 1860, the name was shortened to the Hebrew Relief Society of the City of New York. The Society's duties included providing annual stipends for widows and orphans, educating poor children, and distributing necessities to the poor. The Society consolidated with the Female Benevolent Society in 1870, and became a constituent of the newly formed United Hebrew Charities in 1874. Since 1881, the Society has also assumed the role of granting life pensions to needy congregation members.23

Children's Education
"Men trained in New York were grossly ignorant even of the pronunciation of Hebrew," Hyman Grinstein writes, adding, "The reasons for this paucity of knowledge lie primarily in the low standards of achievement which were set as the goals of Jewish education in America." Later congregations felt obstacles Shearith Israel experienced in Jewish education as well: The increasing importance of secular education; difficulties finding learned, suitable teachers; and abandonment of Jewish schools.24

In the colonial period, religious and secular education was the responsibility of the Church, and Jews provided their own as a community. The earliest reference to a Ribbi (teacher) is Benjamin Elias, who is mentioned in the synagogue minutes in 1728. A school building was erected in 1731 annexed to the Mill Street Synagogue, and the earliest school was called Yeshibat Minhat Areb. Later it simply became known as the Hebra, for the name of the building it occupied.25

Hebrew was taught to children until 1755, when the school became parochial, teaching Hebrew, Spanish, English, writing, and arithmetic. In 1801, Myer Polonies left a generous legacy for a school, and Polonies Talmud Torah opened on May 2, 1802. As Jacob Hartstein writes, "the founding of this school in 1802 did not mark the beginning of a permanent institution." The community faced a constant struggle to maintain teachers and students. At times, the lack of an adequate teacher's salary led to the school's closing.26

When the Free School Society was formed in 1805 introducing the theory of public education, it led to the passing of a State Act on March 12, 1813, establishing common schools. Polonies Talmud Torah reorganized in 1812 into a common school, increasing its quota of free students. A grant had made the reorganization possible; working from a precedent set in 1801 from an Act passed by New York Legislature, Shearith Israel was able to obtain funds from the State as a religious charity school.27

The size of the school, however, remained small. Inadequate teachers remained a challenge and residents were moving northward into the city away from the synagogue. Furthermore, wealthier congregation members also tended to provide their children with private tutors or to place them in Jewish boarding schools.28

After public schools were placed under the auspices of the New York City Board of Education when it was formed in 1842, religious material slowly wound its way out of the schoolroom. In 1851, an Act by the State Legislature banned sectarian schoolbooks in public schools; in 1855, reading passages from the Bible was left to the discretion of the local Ward Boards. More and more parents took advantage of the free education, and the all-day Jewish school was put into a state of crisis.29

The emergence of a supplementary Hebrew school began. Polonies Talmud Torah had begun in 1823 teaching only Hebrew subjects three times a week in the afternoons. When Judah Touro died in 1854, leaving a generous legacy to Polonies Talmud Torah, the school tried again to operate a full-time parochial school. Low student attendance stifled the attempt after a year, and the school reverted to a free Hebrew school for congregation members, providing classes twice a week. Today, Shearith Israel continues to operate a Hebrew school on a part time basis for children and teens.30

Second Mill Street Synagogue
The increase of Jewish immigration to the United States in the early 1800s necessitated a larger synagogue. As the city grew, congregation members followed the northward movement of the residential population, and Shearith Israel was caught between choosing to buy uptown or rebuilding on the existing lot. Sentiment won over demographics, and a second Mill Street Synagogue was constructed in the same location. Dedicated on April 17-18, 1818, the synagogue soon became surrounded by stores. In 1833, the trustees sold the building, and the congregation met in a room of the New York Dispensary for one year until the Crosby Street Synagogue was completed. Using the first Mill Street Synagogue's cornerstone in the Crosby Street's Synagogue foundation helped preserve historical sentiment.31

Crosby Street Synagogue until Today
Crosby Street Synagogue was dedicated on June 12, 1834 and served the congregation for twenty-five years. By 1850, the neighborhood had deteriorated and residents were once again moving away from the district. The congregation sold Crosby Street Synagogue in 1859, and services were held temporarily at 894 Broadway until a new building on Nineteenth Street was erected. Hazzan Jacques Judah Lyons consecrated the Nineteenth Synagogue on September 12, 1860. Residential movement uptown, coupled with problems in the design and structure of the building led trustees to resolve to sell the building in 1864. It was not until 1895 that new lots were found, located on Central Park West and 70th Street. The Nineteenth Street Synagogue was ceremoniously closed and the present site was consecrated on May 19, 1897.32

The present synagogue on Central Park West and 70th Street includes a "little synagogue" that serves as an historic shrine. Religious and ceremonial objects used in prior synagogue buildings, back to 1730 are on display. To commemorate the 300th Anniversary of the Congregation and Settlement of Jews in America in 1954, the congregation built a Community House and a School. It is interesting to note that synagogues after Mill Street did not construct mikvehs (ritual baths). Women who obeyed Family Purity laws were able to use Congregation Bnai Jeshurun's mikvah that was built in 1833.33

Prayer Books
The congregation generally had an insufficient number of prayer books, since they relied on Hebrew prayer books shipped from Amsterdam. Members of the congregation likely referred to the first Jewish prayer book printed in America that was published in 1761. This prayer book was an English translation by an unknown author and was designed to assist those who did not understand Hebrew. Later, the congregation used Sephardi prayer books prepared by various authors in London and a series created in 1838 by Rabbi Isaac Leeser, of Congregation Mikveh Israel in Philadelphia. In 1929, Rev. Dr. David de Sola Pool organized the Union of Sephardic Congregations for the "promotion of the religious interests of Sephardic Jews." Among his projects was creating modern translations of prayer books for the many American Sephardi synagogues that then existed due to increased Sephardi immigration from Turkey, Greece, and Syria.34

Religious Leadership
Jews and non-Jews mixed easily in the New World, and Jews that came to the United States were generally tradesmen and workers, not traditional scholars. Shearith Israel had no ordained Rabbi as a leader until the twentieth century, but relied on Hazzanim to service and minister the congregation.35

The duties of the Hazzan included preaching sermons on special occasions, leading prayer services, teaching children, performing circumcisions, answering simple questions pertaining to Jewish Law, assisting with kashrut issues, and representing the Jewish community in civic affairs. Major questions concerning Jewish law were kept for either visiting Rabbis, traveling to solicit funds for help overseas, or were mailed to a Rabbi in Amsterdam or London. At times, finding a Hazzan to lead the congregation was a challenge, and those that wished to, often remained in their post until their death. The majority of leaders were born and bred in other Sephardic communities such as Curaçao, Holland, and London. Gershom Mendes Seixas, who began his position in 1768, was the earliest native-born Hazzan. Since no rabbinic seminary existed in the United States during his time, Hazzan Joseph Jessurun Pinto served as his primary educator.36

The Hazzan used the title Reverend and was referred to as a Minister, in order to fit the terms used in State law and interfaith civic affairs. The term "minister" may have derived from a 1684 New York law requiring that a minister of religion or a justice of peace was needed to perform marriages. A State law enacted in 1784 permitted any religious society to incorporate (Congregation Shearith Israel immediately took the opportunity). As part of this law, a minister was needed to perform certain trustee duties. New York State changed its marriage law in 1830, expanding the wording to include Jewish customs; however, the term minister remained as a traditional title for Hazzanim in Shearith Israel.37

Involvement in New York Jewish Institutions
Through the activities of its ministers and leading members, Shearith Israel has been involved with establishing many of the first Jewish communal institutions in New York. Among the more significant institutions members have initiated are the Jews' Hospital in New York (1852), Hebrew Sheltering and Guardian Society of New York (1879), the New York Board of Jewish Ministers (1881), Mt. Sinai Training School for Nurses (1882), Montefiore Hospital (1884), Jewish Theological Seminary of America (1886), the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations of America (1898), and the YWHA (1903).38

Women's Work, Pre-Sisterhood
The first organized social work by women in Shearith Israel was the formation of the Female Hebrew Benevolent Society in 1820. The Society cared for poor female Jews and raised funds through synagogue offerings, dinners, and balls. Men organized the events and made appropriate speeches, protecting the women's modesty. In May 1870, the Society consolidated with its male counterpart, the Hebrew Relief Society.39

In 1838, Shearith Israel women were inspired to create an association similar to Rebecca Gratz' Hebrew Sunday School Society. Titled the Association for the Moral and Religious Instruction of Children of the Jewish Faith, a Sunday School for poor children was opened, that was separate from the Polonies Talmud Torah School. Twenty young women in the congregation volunteered to act as teachers for poor children, a sewing committee formed to provide the children with clothes, a library was soon created, and funds were provided through subscriptions. Unfortunately, two years later a smallpox epidemic led to a month of school closings, and the initial eagerness of the young ladies waned as school attendance dropped. Efforts to revive the Society were made in 1845, but attendance still remained low and the Association closed soon after.40

Women were also involved in the New York Hebrew Assistance Society, a Shearith Israel charitable organization that was in operation from 1839 until an unknown date. A ladies' committee was in charge of interviewing applicants.41

The following year, women formed a Ladies Hebra to assist the Hebra Hased Va-Amet with ministering to sick and dying women. The women also sewed burial shrouds for both men and women. The Ladies Hebra was absorbed into Hebra Hased Va-Amet in 1871.42

Several sewing societies were founded to sew clothes for the poor. A Ladies Sewing Association (1847-?) distributed 907 pieces of clothing in 1851. During the Civil War, a Ladies Army Relief sewed clothing, linen, and bandages.43

A Ladies Aid Society (1878- ) combined sewing and relief, and provided help for clients predetermined by the United Hebrew Charities. In 1891, this Society began a Kindergarten Society, through opening a nursery-kindergarten on the Lower East Side. These two societies were later merged in the Sisterhood.44

Rev. Dr. H. Pereira Mendes initiated an Envelope Society in 1889, in order to support Jewish religious schools on the Lower East Side. These schools, which included the Downtown Mission School and Tremont School, helped counteract the Christian proselytizing schools focused on poor immigrant Jewish children. Appeals were sent before Passover, Succos, and Shavous in the form of a card and return envelope. Run by women, the Envelope Society merged into the Sisterhood.45

Shearith Israel Sisterhood
The first Sisterhood of Personal Service in New York City developed as a result of a sermon delivered by Dr. Gustav Gottheil in 1887 at the Reform Temple Emanu-El. In 1896, Rev. Dr. H. Pereira Mendes encouraged the formation of a sisterhood at Shearith Israel. A Federation of Sisterhoods had recently formed to coordinate sisterhood work with United Hebrew Charities, and it is likely that the Sisterhood was organized for this purpose.46

Shearith Israel Sisterhood was the result of a merger of five existing organizations: The Ladies Aid Society, Kindergarten Society, Envelope Society, Downtown Mission School, and Tremont Sunday School. In 1897, the Sisterhood began coordinating relief work with the United Hebrew Charities and was assigned a relief district.47 Relief given to applicants consisted of money, clothing, coal, medical care, or summer outings for mothers and their children.48

The Sisterhood expanded the relief efforts of its predecessors by opening a settlement house and engaging in probation work. Under the strong leadership of its President Alice Davis Menken, a settlement house was established at 58 St. Marks Place. As the need increased for more spacious quarters, the settlement house moved several times throughout lower Manhattan,49 finally arriving at 133 Eldridge Street, where it closed in 1928. In 1928 and into the 1940s, the Sisterhood operated a Talmud Torah (religious school) at the East Side Jewish Center at 128 Stanton Street.50

Alice Davis Menken also initiated probation work, and in 1908, Sisterhood members began taking responsibility for girls put on probation at the Night Court for Women. David de Sola Pool writes, "It's befriending and seeking the rehabilitation of these girls was social pioneering, the fruits of which can be seen in aspects of modern remedial court work..." Work in this area ended when the Night Court for Women dissolved in 1919.51

The 1908 Revolt of the Young Turks was followed by the Balkan War in 1912 and 1913. Marc Angel writes, "... the allies imposed economic measures which proved injurious to the Jews... It was estimated that 200,000 Jews in European Turkey were poverty-stricken." Challenged by the influx of poor and unskilled Sephardim, Shearith Israel insisted that these new immigrants be called "Oriental" Jews to distinguish them from the old Sephardic American Jews, who in actuality were now primarily of mixed Ashkenazi and Sephardic lineage.52

Despite these diplomatic setbacks, the relationship between the old and new groups of Sephardim was generally positive, and the Congregation provided their new brethren with extensive assistance. The Sisterhood formed an Oriental Employment Bureau and its Neighborhood House in the Lower East Side became a Sephardic community center. In 1914, the Neighborhood House built two unique religious facilities for settlement houses: a Talmud Torah (religious school) and a synagogue. The synagogue, called Berith Shalom, offered low membership dues that included the use of Cypress Hills cemetery. In the 1920s, the new Sephardim economically were able to move out of the Lower East Side and in 1924; Coolidge's Immigration Law decreased immigration, slowly setting the stage for the closing of the Neighborhood House in 1928.53

Difficulties in fundraising led the Sisterhood to apply and be admitted in the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies in 1917. When the Federation was forced to cut the Sisterhood's budget in 1932, the Sisterhood withdrew and began to reestablish its own financial footing. Despite the economic challenges, the Sisterhood has been able to continue its general activities that have always formed part of its mission to help the synagogue. These duties include sponsoring lectures and social events, working with Hebra Hased Va-Amet through a last rites committee, decorating the sukkah, and sewing holy vestments for religious ceremonial purposes. During and after World War II, the Sisterhood raised funds, sewed clothing packages, and provided assistance to refugees overseas and new immigrants in the United States and Israel. The Sisterhood is also a member of various women's organizations, among which are the Woman's Branch of the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations and the successor to the Federation of Sisterhoods: Federation of Jewish Women's Organizations.54

Shearith Israel League
In 1897, a Junior League formed under the Sisterhood as a social and leadership training group for girls. The League helped raise considerable funds for the Sisterhood, offering theatre parties and balls. The League was also involved in conducting children's clubs and classes at the Neighborhood House, and visiting local hospitals.55

On November 30, 1919, the Junior League reorganized as an independent society titled Shearith Israel League. The League issued a bulletin from 1922 until 1941, when the congregation took over its publication. Retaining its earlier missions to conduct social activities, offer literary and religious lectures and classes, and provide fundraising events for the synagogue, the Shearith Israel League cohesively provides an important community forum for the congregation.56

Various clubs have sporadically emerged for periods in the congregation's recent history, each designed specifically for different age groups or needs. A Men's Club began in 1935. Among its activities has been to offer social events and lectures and sponsor Memorial Day exercises at Chatham Square cemetery. A Young Peoples Group for members between the ages of twenty and thirty met from 1940-1952, publishing a cookbook and holding social and educational meetings. A Young Marrieds Club met at various members' homes from 1951-1957. A Collegiate Group offered a lecture series from 1969-1971. During the 1980s and early 1990s, a Social Action Committee operated a homeless shelter during the winter months. Throughout the ongoing tide of social clubs, Shearith Israel League, the Sisterhood, and the Men's Club continue to be vibrant societies in the community.57

Adult Education
Prior to 1840, adult education was provided informally, relying on learned men in the community or visiting Rabbis who had received their training overseas. In the late 1800s, when more Ashkenazi Jews began streaming into New York there was an influx of individuals who had higher Jewish learning. In 1840, the newly established Hebrew Literary and Religious Library Association used Crosby Street Synagogue's schoolroom to provide lectures and classes for adults. Although proposals were made, adult education did not become a permanent fixture in Shearith Israel until Henry Pereira Mendes became the congregation's minister in 1877. In 1919, the newly formed Shearith Israel League included within its social activities "literary and religious lectures and classes." David de Sola Pool began weekly Sabbath Talmud class called Maimonides Talmud Circle in 1933, and a biweekly Collegiate Talmud Class met for a short time in 1971. The Men's Club, founded in 1935, began a lectures series; as did a Collegiate group that met from 1969 to 1971. In 1973, Shearith Israel established a program of Adult Jewish Studies. The program began offering university level courses under a four-year curriculum, and was placed under the auspices of the newly founded Sephardic House from 1978 until 1992, until the Sephardic House became a separate entity.58

Cemeteries
The first cemetery used for Jewish burial in New York was the aforementioned "little hook of land" granted by the Dutch to the Jewish refugees in 1656. The location of this land remains a mystery. The Congregation then acquired its Chatham Square Cemetery, which was used from 1682 until 1831.59

The increase of population coupled by epidemics led the congregation to buy land on the north side of Thirteenth Street for use as a cemetery. Used only from 1802-1803, this cemetery held one burial before the city's development encroached upon its space.60

The next lots of land bought for burial use was in 1804 at Eleventh Street. The Congregation dedicated this area as Beth Haim Shenee (The Second Cemetery), and transferred into it the one grave from Thirteenth Street. This cemetery supplemented the one at Chatham Square. It was first used solely those who died from infectious diseases, and later opened to the poor and strangers. A severe epidemic of yellow fever in 1822 led city officials to prohibit any further burials within certain areas of the city, closing off Chatham Square cemetery. From 1823 until 1830 when further city development reconstructed Eleventh Street, the Second Cemetery was the only Jewish burial ground used. A small triangle of land still remains of this graveyard, and the graves that were disturbed by the city's construction were moved into the smaller area.61

In 1828, the congregation purchased plots of land farther afield from what was then the center of town, on Seventy-First Street. The expense and inconvenience of visiting the cemetery prohibited its use. The congregation finally sold the land in 1864. Another area on Twenty-First Street was acquired in 1829. Dedicated as Beth Hayim Shelishi (The Third Cemetery), the congregation enlarged the cemetery in 1831 and later in 1844. Mordechai M. Noah was one of the last interred in this ground, having passed away in March 1851, three months before a City Ordinance prohibited further burials south of Eighty-Sixth Street. 62

Since this time, the congregation has used land at Cypress Hills Cemetery on Long Island. Out of the six cemeteries actually used by the Congregation, the following four can still be visited: Chatham Square, Eleventh Street (the Second Cemetery), Twenty-first Street (the Third Cemetery), and Cypress Hills.

List of Ministers63
Saul Pardo, 1655-1682
Abraham Haim de Lucena, 1682-1720
Benjamin Wolf, 1720-1726
Moses Lopez de Fonseca, 1726-1736
David Mendes Machado, 1736-1747
Benjamin Pereira Mendes, 1748-1757
Isaac Cohen Da Silva, 1757-1759, 1766-1768
Joseph Jessurun Pinto, 1759-1766
Gershom Mendes Seixas, 1768-1776, 1785-1816
Jacob Raphael Cohen, 1783-1784
Emanuel Nunez Carvalho, 1784
Moses Levi Maduro Peixotto, 1816-1828
Isaac Benjamin Seixas, 1828-1839
Jacques Judah Lyons, 1839-1877
Henry Pereira Mendes, 1877-1920
David De Sola Pool, 1907-1919, 1922-1970
Louis C. Gerstein, 1942-1996
Marc D. Angel, 1969-
Hayym Angel, 1997-

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Scope and Content Note

The records of Congregation Shearith Israel represent the congregation's administrative, religious, educational, and social activities dating from the eighteenth through the twentieth century.

Researchers interested in the following subject areas will find this collection valuable: Jews in early Colonial America, Sephardic American and international history, Jewish involvement in the Revolutionary and Civil Wars and World Wars I and II, women's involvement in war relief, Anniversaries of the Congregation and Jewish settlement in America, Jewish patriotic celebrations, the early burial ground at Chatham Square, the oldest existing Jewish philanthropic organization in New York called Hebra Hased Va Amet, Sisterhoods, probation work, settlement houses, men's clubs, early Sephardic Hebrew education in America, adult educational and social programs provided through the Congregation, and Congregation Mikve Israel in Philadelphia.

The records contain material regarding later Ministers of the Congregation, particularly Louis Coleman Gerstein, Henry Pereira Mendes, and David de Sola Pool. Other clergy represented in the collection include Marc D. Angel, Abraham Lopes Cardozo, Solomon Gaon, Jacques Judah Lyons, Yitzhak Nissim, Gershom Mendes Seixas, and Isaac Benjamin Seixas. Presidents that figure prominently in the records consist of Mortimer Morange Menken, Napthali Taylor Phillips, and Sisterhood President Alice Davis Menken.

Early eighteenth and nineteenth century material is available on microfilm only. This material consists of financial, property, and trustee records; forms of service and prayers; lists of offerings and congregational honors; a library catalogue for a religious school; and items pertaining to the Shearith Israel Sisterhood and Hebra Hased Va Amet societies and the Chatham Square Cemetery. Of interest is a book of misheberag ascaboth listing honors, special occasions, memorials, the sick, and births among congregation members for the year 1759. Also of significance is a bound ledger recording tombstone inscriptions and grave locations for Chatham Square Cemetery.

Later material documents the Congregation's services and celebrations, societies, dedications and memorial services held at Chatham Square Cemetery, relief work conducted during World Wars I and II, trustee meetings and reports, and papers pertaining to clergy. Types of material found within the later period in the collection include addresses, administrative and trustee records, announcements, bulletins, calendars, historical summaries, invitations, news clippings, newsletters, orders of service, pamphlets, prayers, press releases, programs, reports, sermons, and souvenir journals. Of interest is a typescript taken from Jacques Judah Lyon's memorandum book pertaining to the New York Jewish community's response to the Civil War. Synagogue publications include issues of the Bulletin that contains summaries of Sephardic American and international history, sermons and addresses by Ministers, and congregational news.

The collection is organized into the following ten series: Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material; Series II: Histories; Series III: Administration; Series IV: Clergy; Series V: Services and Celebrations; Series VI: Education; Series VII: Societies; Series VIII: Chatham Square Cemetery; Series IX: War Activities; and Series X: Synagogue Publications.

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Arrangement

The collection has been arranged into ten series and oversized separate material listing as follows:

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Access and Use

Access Restrictions

The collection is open to all researchers by permission of the Director of Library and Archives of the American Jewish Historical Society, except items that are restricted due to their fragility.

Use Restrictions

Information concerning the literary rights may be obtained from the Executive Director of the American Jewish Historical Society. Users must apply in writing for permission to quote, reproduce or otherwise publish manuscript materials found in this collection. For more information contact:
American Jewish Historical Society, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY, 10011
email: reference@ajhs.org

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Related Material

American Jewish Historical Society, New York, NY
Archives
American Jewish Tercentenary Celebration Collection (I-11)
Curaçao Jewish Community Collection (I-112)
Mayor's Court (New York, NY), Selected briefs (I-151)
Franks Family, Papers (P-142)
Da Costa family, Collection (P-145)
Gomez family, Papers (P-62)
Gratz Family, Papers (P-8)
Hart family, Estate inventories (P-226)
Judah family (New York and Richmond), Papers (P-77)
Jacques Judah Lyons, Collection (P-15)
Alice Davis Menken, Papers (P-23)
Samuel Oppenheim, Oppenheim Collection (P-255)
Benjamin Franklin Peixotto, Family Papers (P-195)
Phillips family, Papers (P-17)
Seixas family, Papers (P-60)
Touro family, Papers (P-214)
Banner from the Centennial Celebration, Hebra Hased Ve Emet, Museum collection

Rare Book Collections
An act to incorporate "The Hebrew Female Benevolent Society..., 1855, Rosenbach #S 1404
An act to provide for the incorporation of religious societies, 1805, Soble #16; 1835, Rosenbach #383
Conditions and terms of leasing the seats in the new synagogue, 1834, Rosenbach #S 580
Congregation Shearith Israel Statement, 1812, Rosenbach, #S-226
Constitution of the Congregation..., 1805, Soble #17, Rosenbach #S 157
Constitution and the Rights Appertaining to Members... of the Hebra Hased Va-Amet, 1871 Rosenbach, #S-2293
Discourse, delivered by Mordecai M. Noah, at consecration of the synagogue of Congregation Shearith Israel, 1818, Rosenbach #199
Form of service at the dedication of the new synagogue, 1818, Rosenbach #197
Form of service at the dedication of the new synagogue..., 1834, Rosenbach #382
Form of service for the dedication of the new synagogue..., 1860, Rosenbach, #S-1679
New York (State) Senate. An Act in relation to the cemetery grounds of the Congregation Shearith Israel, 1853, Rosenbach, #S-1301
Notice of Annual Meeting of the Electors, Statement of Funds, 1852, No #
Notice of seating arrangements, 1828, No #
Order of the Burial Service and Rules for the Mournings…of the Hebra Hased Va-Amet, 1827, Rosenbach #291
Programme of the Hebrew Sacred Concert... Synagogue in Crosby St., 1841, Rosenbach #474
Report of M.L. Moses and Judah Zuntz, Committee of Accounts of K.K.S.I., 1824, Rosenbach #265
Report of the proceedings in the case of Mrs. Anne Seixas, 1823, Rosenbach, #S-379
Rules and Regulations for the ... School for Gratuitous Instruction in the Hebrew Language... Rev. J.J. Lyons, Teacher, 1845, Rosenbach #572
Invitation, June 9, 1805, to attend a meeting..., Rosenbach, #S 159
Invitation, October 18, 1811, Rosenbach, #S 213

Congregation Shearith Israel, New York, NY
Congregation Shearith Israel, Manuscript Collection
Congregation Shearith Israel, Contacts with Clergy
Congregation Shearith Israel, Sheet music
Congregation Shearith Israel, Clerk's Office, Records
Congregation Shearith Israel, Men's Club, Records
Congregation Shearith Israel, Shearith Israel League, Records
Congregation Shearith Israel, Sisterhood, Records
Congregation Shearith Israel, Tercentenary Committee Records
Congregation Shearith Israel, Young Men's Club, Records
Hebra Hased Va-Amet, Records
Polonies Talmud Torah School, Records
Isaac Phillips Cohen, Papers
Henry S. Hendricks, Papers
Louis Napoleon Levy, Papers
Lyons family, Papers
Henry Pereira Mendes, Papers
Nathan Gratz, Papers
David de Sola Pool and Tamar Hirshenson de Sola Pool, Papers

Yeshiva University, Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, New York, NY
High Holiday schedules and sermons

Yeshiva University, Archives, New York, NY
Henry Illoway Papers

American Jewish Archives, Cincinnati, OH
Harmon Hendricks Papers
Henry Pereira Mendes, Papers

Jewish Theological Seminary, New York, NY
Henry Pereira Mendes, Papers

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Preferred Citation

Published citations should take the following form:
Identification of item, date (if known); Congregation Shearith Israel, Records; I-4; box number; folder number; American Jewish Historical Society, Boston, MA and New York, NY.

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Container List

The following section contains a detailed listing of the materials in the collection.

 

Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, undated, 1730-1938, 1941.

English and Hebrew.
Box 1, Box 2 (Folders 1-5), Oversized Folders OS1F 1 and 3, OS2F 1, MAP Folder 1.
Arrangement:

Subseries are arranged by subject.

Scope and Content:

Note: Series I is restricted; it is available on microfilm only.

The bulk of Shearith Israel's early material is located within this series. The series includes financial, property, and trustee records; forms of service and prayers, lists of offerings and congregational honors; a library catalogue for a religious school; and items pertaining to the Shearith Israel Sisterhood and Hebra Hased Va Amet societies and the Chatham Square Cemetery. Series I is divided into five subseries: Subseries A: Adminstration; Subseries B: Services and Celebrations; Subseries C: Education; Subseries D: Societies; and Subseries E: Cemetery. The subseries mimic the same order as the series for the rest of the collection.

Subseries A: Administration, undated, 1771, 1790, 1797-1831, 1833, 1838-1839, 1860, 1898

English, Hebrew.
Box 1, Folders 1-9, Oversized Folders OS1F 3 and OS2F 1, MAP Folder 1.
Arrangement:

Folders are arranged chronologically according to the first date listed.

Scope and Content:

This subseries includes financial, property, and trustee records. Financial records consist of statements of accounts, receipts, and a list of offerings; property records include land indentures for the synagogue of Mill Street and the land adjoining the Jews' Burying Ground, and property plans for auditorium seats and the Mill Street property; trustee records contain meeting minutes, reports, resolutions, lists, and correspondence.

Of significant interest within the trustee records are resolutions, located in Box 1, Folder 6. These consist of statements written by the Board upon the death of Rev. Isaac B. Seixas and Moses L. Moses, an appointment of Rev. Jacques J. Lyons as Hazzan, a note that trustee meetings were not held during the Revolutionary war, a statement as to the number of services to be conducted during the Civil War, plans for the 1860 consecration of the synagogue, the sale of Mill Street property, and an appeal issued by Board of Delegates of American Israelites to help Jews in Rome.

See also:

(Chatham Square Cemetery): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries E: Cemetery; Series VII: Societies, Subseries C: Men's Club; Series VIII: Cemetery; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Civil War): Series IV: Clergy

(1860 Synagogue Consecration): Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries B: Anniversary Services and Celebrations

(Financial Reports): Series III: Administration

(Jacques J. Lyons): Series IV: Clergy; Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries B: Anniversary Services and Celebrations

(Mill Street Synagogue): Series X: Synagogue Publications; Subseries A: Discontinued Publications; Subseries C: Bulletin

(Revolutionary War): Series VIII: Cemetery; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Isaac B. Seixas): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Series B: Services and Celebrations

(Trustee Records): Series III: Administration; Series IV: Clergy; Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries B: Anniversary Services and Celebrations; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

Box Folder Title Date
MAP 1 Indenture for land adjoining Jews' Burying Ground, N.Y. 1771
    View the item  
Box Folder Title Date
1 1 Bond, KKSI, and Isaac Roosevelt, 178-, Indenture for land on Mill St. 1790
    View the item  
1 2 Financial accounts (incomplete) 1797-1830
    View the item  
1 3 Receipts 1797-1831
    View the item  
1 4 Documents concerning Aaron Levy (President) 1804-1805, 1815
    View the item  
1 5 List of congregants who did not sign the Constitution's by-laws 1807
    View the item  
Box Folder Title Date
OSF1 3 Statement of the funds of the Congregation and List of Offerings, third quarter November 22, 1801 and 1818.
Box Folder Title Date
1 6 Board of Trustees, notices and resolutions undated, 1825, 1838-1839
    View the item  
1 7 Plan for Mill Street property 1833
    View the item  
1 8 Copies of minutes of Trustees' meetings 1860
    Contains Hebrew.   
    View the item  
1 9 Board of Trustees, sale of old synagogue 1898
    View the item  
Box Folder Title Date
OSF2 1 Plan of Auditorium Seats undated

Subseries B: Services and Celebrations, undated, 1730-1938

English, Hebrew, Portuguese.
Box 1, Folders 10-19, Oversized Folder OS1F 1.
Arrangement:

Folders are arranged chronologically according to the first date listed.

Scope and Content:

This subseries consists of forms of service and prayers, a book of misheberag ascaboth, notes from a Sofer (scribe) concerning torah scrolls, and lists of offerings and those receiving honors.

Box 1, Folder 10, Forms of service and prayers, includes a 1761 translation of Yom Kippur prayers by Isaac Seixas. Folder 10 also contains forms of service to commemorate the hurricane of 1831; prayers for the government and congregations in Curaçao, London, and Surinam; orders of service for Thanksgiving prayers; verses and forms of calling the Hatanim; and misheberach for various occasions.

Two Book of Extracts of Misheberag Ascaboth, one maintained by Hazan Joseph Jesurun Pinto, is located in Box 1, Folder 11. These books lists honors, special occasions, memorials, the sick, and births among congregation members for the years 1759 and 1853. The book dated 1759 also includes misheberach prayers and a calendar in Portuguese.

Box 1, Folder 12 contains a note in Hebrew by a Sofer (scribe) verifying the inspection of two torah scrolls. Box 1, Folder 13 lists congregants receiving honors for the years 1844-1850; Box 1, Folder 14 contains a list of offerings from congregants. Box 1, Folder 15 are typescript pages copied from the congregation's register, describing the conversion ceremony of Abraham Kirkas' in 1848. Box 1, Folder 16 describes the transfer and contents of the cornerstone from the Crosby synagogue to the new synagogue on 19th street, and an order of service for the cornerstone's laying. Box 1, Folder 17 contain orders of service to memorialize the late President James Garfield and Sir Moses Montefiore. A prayer for the Thanksgiving service also commemorating Sir Moses Montefiore, is located in Box 1, Folder 18. Box 1, Folder 19 includes invitations, orders of service, and news clippings of the events surrounding the congregation's move from 19th Street to Central Park West and 17th Street, its current location.

See also:

(Calendars): Series III: Administration; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries A: Discontinued Publications; Subseries B: Calendars

(Forms of Service and Prayers): Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Memorials for Late Presidents and State Figures): Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries A: Religious Services, Jewish and Secular; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Move from Crosby Street to 19th Street): Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries B: Anniversary Services and Celebrations

(Move from 19th Street to Central Park West and 17th Street): Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries B: Anniversary Services and Celebrations

(Isaac B. Seixas): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries A: Administration

(Sephardic History): Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries B: Anniversary Services and Celebrations; Series VII: Societies, Subseries D: Sephardic House; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries B: Calendars; Subseries C: Bulletin

(Thanksgiving Day Services): Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries A: Religious Services, Jewish and Secular; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Torah Scrolls): Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries A: Religious Services, Jewish and Secular

Box Folder Title Date
1 10 Forms of service and prayers for various occasions undated, 1755, 1819, 1831, 1869
    Contains Hebrew, Portuguese.   
    View the item  
1 11 Extracts from Book of Misheberag Ascaboth, 1759, 1853. 1759, 1853
   

Book with special services on the anniversaries of the consecration of the synagogues of Congregation Shearith Israel, 1730-1938 (Restricted)

Contains Hebrew, Portuguese. 
 
    View the item  
    View the item  
1 11a Extracts from Book of Misheberag Ascaboth, User Copies 1759
    Contains Hebrew, Portuguese.   
1 12 Notes from a Sofer to the Congregation 1833
    Contains Hebrew.   
    View the item  
1 13 List of people receiving honors 1844-1850
    Contains Hebrew, Portuguese.   
    View the item  
1 14 Offerings, Escaboth undated, 1846
    View the item  
1 15 Conversion, Abraham Kirkas 1848
    View the item  
Box Folder Title Date
OSF1 1 Forms of Service and Prayers for various occasions 1856
Box Folder Title Date
1 16 Laying of cornerstone, 19th Street, Service and Inscriptions 1858
    Contains Hebrew.   
    View the item  
1 17 Memorial services for James A. Garfield and Sir Moses Montefiore 1881, 1884
    View the item  
1 18 Thanksgiving Service 1884
    Contains Hebrew.   
    View the item  
1 19 Consecration of New Synagogue 1890, 1896-1897
    Contains Hebrew.   
    View the item  

Subseries C: Education, undated, 1878, 1897

English.
Box 1, Folders 20 and 21.
Arrangement:

Folders are arranged chronologically according to the first date listed.

Scope and Content:

This subseries, composed of three items, consists of a library catalogue for Polonies Talmud Torah School, dated 1878, that belonged to Mrs. Charles Hendricks, granddaughter of Revolutionary War Financier Haym Salomon. The second and third items are an undated and a 1897 invitation that Rev. H. Pereira Mendes sent to congregants, inviting them to attend a series of lectures held on diverse themes.

See also:

(Lecture Series): Series VI: Education; Series VII: Societies, Subseries D: Sephardic House

(Henry Pereira Mendes): Series IV: Clergy; Series IX: War Activities; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Polonies Talmud Torah School): Series VI: Education; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries A: Discontinued Publications; Subseries C: Bulletin

Box Folder Title Date
1 20 Polonies Talmud Torah School 1878
    View the item  
1 21 Lecture Series undated, 1897
    View the item  

Subseries D: Societies, 1806, 1812, 1817, 1834, 1852, circa 1854, 1896-1897, 1901-1902

English and Hebrew .
Box 2, Folders 1-5.
Scope and Content:

Items pertaining to the oldest Jewish benevolent society in New York City, Hebra Hased Va Amet, and the Congregation's Sisterhood are located in this subseries. Among the items found among the Hebra Hased Va Amet records are constitutions issued in 1806, 1812, and 1901; and material relating to the society's 50th and 100th anniversaries. The Sisterhood items consist of a letterhead penciled with the year 1817; a history of the Ladies' Aid Society; a notice of the merger of Ladies' Aid, Kindergarten and Envelope Societies into the new Sisterhood, dated 1896; officers of the Sisterhood for the years 1896-1897; and a benefit performance program for the Sisterhood held at the Waldorf-Astoria in 1897. The subseries also includes an 1834 application sent to the Board to begin a singing class, in order "to produce order, and devotion, in chanting praises to the Lord."

See also:

(Envelope Society): Series III: Administration

(Hebra Hased Va Amet): Series III: Administration; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries A: Discontinued Publications

(Ladies' Aid Society): Series IV: Clergy; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Sisterhood): Series IV: Clergy; Series VII: Societies, Subseries A: Shearith Israel Sisterhood; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries A: Discontinued Publications; Subseries C: Bulletin

Box Folder Title Date
2 1 Items pertaining to the Hebra Hased Va Amet 1806, 1852, 1901-1902
    Contains Hebrew.   
    View the item  
2 2 Second Constitution of the Hebra Hased Va Amet 1812
    Contains Hebrew.   
    View the item  
2 3 Shearith Israel Sisterhood 1817, 1896-1897
    View the item  
2 4 Application for a singing class 1834
    View the item  
2 5 Ladies' Aid Society circa 1854
    View the item  

Subseries E: Chatham Square Cemetery, undated, 1812, 1894, 1941

English, Hebrew , Portuguese.
Box 2, Folders 6-7.
Scope and Content:

Material concerning the Chatham Square Cemetery, built in 1701, is found within this subseries. Box 2, Folder 6 consists of a bill for repair work, an historical summary, lists of names of those interred, a survey of the burial ground, copies of land indentures, a 1941 New York State act permitting a public highway to be built through cemetery land, and two photographs of a grave site. Box 2, Folder 7 is a bound ledger that was compiled by N. Taylor and Rosalie S. Phillips in 1894. The ledger lists tombstone inscriptions and contains a map of the graves.

See also:

(Chatham Square Cemetery): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries A: Administration; Series VII: Societies, Subseries C: Men's Club; Series VIII: Chatham Square Cemetery; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

Box Folder Title Date
2 6 Cemetery undated, 1812, 1941
    View the item  
2 7 Cemetery Register (includes diagram and tombstone inscriptions) 1894
    Contains Hebrew, Portuguese.   
    View the item  
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Series II: Histories, undated, 1940, 1950-1957, 1975

English
Box 3, Folder 1-3.
Arrangement:

Folders are arranged chronologically according to the first date listed.

Scope and Content:

This series consists of three folders of general historical information. Box 3, Folder 1 contains a detailed historical summary of the congregation that was written upon the occasion of the consecration of the Central West and 70th Street synagogue building. The twenty-one paged summary details the early beginnings of the congregation and describes each minister who led the congregation from its beginnings up until the 1890s.

Box 3, Folder 2 contains general informative pamphlets, outlining the services and societies the synagogue offers. A page from an article titled "Oldest New York-Seventeenth Century Churches," mentions that South William Street was "the birthplace of Christian and Jewish worship in New York."

Box 3, Folder 3 consists of an invitation to and a transcript of "An Evening of Reminiscences," a symposium that took place on November 20, 1975. The symposium assembled several older members of the congregation who presented their memories of Shearith Israel.

See also:

(Histories): Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries B: Anniversary Services and Celebrations; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries A: Discontinued Publications; Subseries C: Bulletin

(Ministers): Series IV: Clergy; Series VII: Societies, Subseries B: Shearith Israel League; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

Box Folder Title Date
3 1 History of Congregation Shearith Israel undated
3 2 General historical information undated, 1940, 1950-1957
3 3 "An Evening of Reminiscences" 1975
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Series III: Administration, undated, 1905, 1909-1910, 1918-1919, 1921, 1923-1925, 1927-1929, 1931, 1935-1936, 1939, 1944-1945, 1947, 1952, 1958

English
Box 3, Folders 4-12.
Arrangement:

Folders are arranged chronologically according to the first date listed.

Scope and Content:

This series includes Board and committee minutes, annual and financial reports, the constitution and by-laws, appeals for funds, and a mitzvoth list. Organizations using space within the Shearith Israel building are also located within this series. Items from these organizations consist of a program from the 2nd Annual Play Contest conducted by Habanoth clubs and an invitation signed by prominent members of the Jewish community to initiate a Sabbath Observance Association.

Box 3, Folder 4 contains minutes of a meeting of trustees concerning the 250th anniversary of Jews settling in America, notices of elections, rules for behavior during services, a petition for a qualified spiritual leader, a survey of administrative practices in five West Side congregations, and notices issued by Mortimer Menken, President. Box 3, Folder 5 contains president and annual reports for six select years; Box 3, Folder 6 consists of appeals for funds from congregants. Among the appeals are for donations for the Welfare Island Synagogue, Hebra Hased Va Amet, Jewish Theological Seminary, and the Envelope Society. Box 3, Folder 7 contains financial reports for five specific years. Minutes from a 1936 meeting of the Committee on Synagogue Attendance is located in Box 3, Folder 9. Among the resolutions that were made at this meeting was the preparation of weekly calendar mailings to congregants.

See also:

(Calendars): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries B: Services and Celebrations; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries A: Discontinued Publications; Subseries B: Calendars

(Envelope Society): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries D: Societies

(Financial Reports): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries A: Administration

(Hebra Hased Va Amet): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries D: Societies; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries A: Discontinued Publications

(Trustee Records): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries A: Administration; Series IV: Clergy; Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries B: Anniversary Services and Celebrations; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(250th Anniversary): Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries B: Anniversary Services and Celebrations; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries A: Discontinued Publications

Box Folder Title Date
3 4 Board of Trustees, minutes, notices, and reports 1905, 1909, 1918, 1921, 1924, 1936, 1947
3 5 President and Annual Reports 1910, 1918-1919, 1923, 1927-1929
3 6 Appeals for Funds undated, 1925, 1936, 1958
3 7 Financial Reports 1931, 1935, 1944-1945, 1952
3 8 Mitzvoth list 1935-1936
3 9 Committee on Synagogue Attendance, minutes 1936
3 10 Habanoth (using SI Space) 1939
3 11 Sabbath Observance Association (using SI space) undated
3 12 Constitution and By-laws undated
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Series IV: Clergy, undated, 1899, 1902-1903, 1907, 1911-1912, 1914, 1916-1917, 1919-1937, 1940-1947, 1950, 1952, 1954-1957, 1961, 1963-1965, 1967-1968, 1971, 1979

English, Hebrew.
Box 3, Folders 13-23, Box 4, Folders 1-2.
Arrangement:

Folders are arranged alphabetically

Scope and Content:

This series includes material regarding hazzanim, ministers, and choirmasters of Shearith Israel Congregation and other congregations in New York and England. Box 3, Folder 13 consists of announcements of guest Rabbis and an upcoming visit of Israeli Prime Minister Levi Eshkol. Box 3, Folder 14 contains notices of the funeral for Assistant Hazzan James M. Wahnon's and the appointment of Rev. D.A. Jessurun Cardozo as Assistant Hazzan. Box 3, Folders 15-Box 4, Folder 2, are dedicated to specific Hazzans or Rabbis: Box 3, Folder 17 concerns David De Sola Pool; Folder 19 Louis C. Gerstein; and Box 4, Folders 1 and 2 Henry Pereira Mendes. Materials within these folders include invitations, announcements, a resolution, news clippings, prayers, souvenir journals, and sermons.

Box 3, Folder 23, entitled Rev. Jacques J. Lyons, contains a typescript of Lyons' memorandum book. The book follows the New York Jewish community's response to the Civil War. Copies of trustee notices and news clippings describe the creation of a ladies relief society by Shearith Israel and include an address by J.J. Lyons at the initial meeting. Additional ladies relief societies and patriotic ceremonies held at other New York synagogues are also noted. One news clipping contains the address of Dr. Raphall of Synagogue B'nai Jeshurun. An extensive amount of the typescript is dedicated to the war career of Captain Augustus Shimmel.

See also:

(Abraham Lopes Cardozo): Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Civil War): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries A: Administration

(Solomon Gaon): Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Louis C. Gerstein): Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Ladies' Aid Society): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries D: Societies; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Jacques J. Lyons): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries A: Administration; Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries B: Anniversary Services and Celebrations

(Henry Pereira Mendes): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries C: Education; Series IX: War Activities; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Ministers): Series II: Histories; Series VII: Societies, Subseries B: Shearith Israel League; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(David De Sola Pool): Series IX: War Activities; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Sisterhood): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries D: Societies; Series VII: Societies, Subseries A: Shearith Israel Sisterhood; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries A: Discontinued Publications; Subseries C: Bulletin

(Trustee Records): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries A: Administration; Series III: Administration; Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries B: Anniversary Services and Celebrations; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

Box Folder Title Date
3 13 Guest Rabbis and State Figures undated, 1926-1929, 1964
3 14 Hazzans 1936, 1943
3 15 Rev. Abraham Lopes Cardozo (contains Hebrew) 1971
    Contains Hebrew.   
3 16 Rev. Joseph Corcos 1919, 1921
    Contains Hebrew.   
3 17 Rev. David De Sola Pool undated, 1907, 1914, 1916-1917, 1922-1937, 1941-1942, 1944-1947, 1950, 1952, 1954-1955, 1957, 1963, 1965
    Contains Hebrew.   
3 18 Rev. Dr. Solomon Gaon 1957, 1967
3 19 Rev. Dr. Louis C. Gerstein 1942, 1956, 1961, 1964-1965, 1967-1968, 1979
    Contains Hebrew.   
3 20 Rev. Dr. Gustav Gottheil, Resolution upon his death 1903
3 21 Choirmaster Osker Guttmann 1941
3 22 Choirmaster Leon M. Kramer 1933, 1941
3 23 Rev. Jacques J. Lyons 1912
    Contains Hebrew.   
Box Folder Title Date
4 1 Rev. Dr. H. Pereira Mendes undated, 1899, 1902, 1911, 1919-1920, 1925, 1932, 1934, 1937, 1940
    Contains Hebrew.   
4 2 Rev. Dr. Henry Pereira Mendes, 50 Years of Service 1927
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Series V: Services and Celebrations, undated, 1901, 1905, 1908, 1918-1919, 1921-1942, 1944-1945, 1950, 1955-1958, 1960-1963, 1965, 1972, 1974-1976, 1978, 1980, 1984

English, Hebrew.
Box 4, Folders 3-15, Box 5, Folder 1-8.
Arrangement:

Subseries are arranged by subject.

Scope and Content:

This series contains material regarding religious celebrations and anniversaries held by the Congregation. In addition to religious holidays, the Congregation conducted religious services for specific secular occasions. These occasions included an annual Thanksgiving Day service and memorial services for State Figures. The Congregation also held services and celebrations surrounding the anniversaries of its previous synagogue buildings and the settlement of Jews in America, an identical anniversary to the beginning of Shearith Israel Congregation. The Congregation commemorated its early colonial roots through patriotic celebrations, such as anniversaries for George Washington and America's Bicentennial, and its Sephardic heritage, through anniversaries for Moses Maimonides. The series is divided into three subseries: Subseries A: Religious Services, Jewish and Secular; Subseries B: Anniversary Services and Celebrations; and Subseries C: Religious Celebrations.

Subseries A: Religious Services, Jewish and Secular, undated, 1901, 1908, 1921-1933, 1935-1938, 1940-1942, 1945, 1950, 1956-1958, 1961-1963, 1965, 1978, 1984

English, Hebrew.
Box 4, Folders 3-8.
Arrangement:

Folders are arranged chronologically according to the first date listed.

Scope and Content:

This subseries consists of invitations, announcements, orders of services, a resolution, and a news clipping pertaining to religious services held by the Congregation for Jewish and secular occasions.

Box 4, Folder 3 includes notice and orders of service memorializing the deaths of Presidents William McKinley, Warren G. Harding, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and John F. Kennedy. A resolution recognizes the contributions of Benjamin N. Cardozo, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court and a notice announces memorial services for Sir Winston Churchill.

Box 4, Folder 4 contains invitations to a tablet dedication for Touro Synagogue that took place in 1908, a rededication of the renovated Shearith Israel Synagogue (an order of service is also included), a service presenting a flag to Grace Church, a dedication of two Torah scrolls, and a program titled Sephardic Focus: 1978.

Box 4, Folder 5 consists of invitations to attend a Mishmara, midnight service, for Hoshanna Rabah as well as an invitation to attend Succoth eve services that coincide with the National Prayer day for peace.

Box 4, Folder 6 contain invitations to receptions held in honor of the Hatan Torah and Hatan Beresheedt for Shabbath Beresheeth. Box 4, Folder 7 consists of invitations and order of service for Thanksgiving Day, a tradition established by the Congregation since 1789 by Gershom Mendes Seixas.

Box 4, Folder 8 includes a pulpit announcement for 1924-1925, an order of service for Shabuoth in 1927 and 1928, a news clipping describing the Fast of Ab, a table used to calculate Shabbath times, a general guide to services by Rev. Louis C. Gerstein, and a description of Rosh Hashanah services.

See also:

(Memorials for Late Presidents and State Figures): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries B: Services and Celebrations; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Thanksgiving Day Services): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries B: Services and Celebrations; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Torah Scrolls): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries B: Services and Celebrations

Box Folder Title Date
4 3 Memorial Services and Resolutions for State Figures 1901, 1923, 1938, 1945, 1963, 1965
4 4 Special Services 1908, 1921, 1925, 1950, 1978
    Contains Hebrew.   
4 5 Succoth and Hoshanah Rabah Services undated, 1922-1924, 1926, 1929-1931, 1933, 1935-1936, 1938, 1941, 1962, 1984
4 6 Hatanim and Assistant Hazzan, Reception undated, 1922-1923, 1929-1933, 1935, 1937-1938
4 7 Thanksgiving Day Service undated, 1922, 1924-1928, 1942, 1945, 1956-1958, 1961
    Contains Hebrew.   
4 8 Synagogue Services undated, 1924-1925, 1927-1928, 1940, 1960

Subseries B: Anniversary Services and Celebrations, undated, 1905, 1930-1932, 1934-1935, 1937-1939, 1942, 1952, 1954-1955, 1957, 1972, 1974-1976, 1980

English, Hebrew .
Box 4, Folders 9-14, Box 5, Folders 1-7.
Arrangement:

Folders are arranged chronologically according to the first date listed.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains trustee notices, committee meeting minutes, invitations, programs, addresses, an exhibition catalogue, and orders of service that commemorate anniversaries of the Congregation's synagogue buildings and the establishment of the synagogue and the first Jewish settlement in America. This subseries also includes material documenting anniversaries for George Washington, the discovery of America and American independence, Moses Maimonides, and the State of Israel. Box 4, Folder 11 consists of an address by Rev. Jacques J. Lyons' nephew, name unknown, who reminiscences back to the 1860 ceremony dedicating the 19th Street synagogue. A copy of the cornerstone box inscription placed at 19th Street is also located in Folder 11. Box 4, Folder 9 and Box 5, Folders 1, 4, and 5 are dedicated to anniversaries of the establishment of the Congregation and the Jewish settlement in America. Box 5, Folder 1 contains an historical presentation written for the 283rd anniversary of the Congregation's founding and Jewish settlement in America. Box 5, Folder 4 includes minutes for the second meeting of the Tercentenary Committee, a pamphlet describing the synagogue's history, an exhibition catalogue, and an invitation to a dinner held by Shearith Israel at Waldorf-Astoria.

See also:

(1860 Synagogue Consecration): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries A: Administration

(Histories): Series II: Histories; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries A: Discontinued Publications; Subseries C: Bulletin

(Jacques J. Lyons): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries A: Administration; Series IV: Clergy

(Move from Crosby Street to 19th Street): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries B: Services and Celebrations

(Move from 19th Street to Central Park West and 17th Street): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries B: Services and Celebrations

(Sephardic History): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries B: Services and Celebrations; Series VII: Societies, Subseries D: Sephardic House; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries B: Calendars; Subseries C: Bulletin

(Trustee Records): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries A: Administration; Series III: Administration; Series IV: Clergy; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(250th Anniversary): Series III: Administration; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries A: Discontinued Publications

Box Folder Title Date
4 9 250th Anniversary 1905
    Contains Hebrew.   
4 10 200th and 250th Anniversary, Mill Street Synagogue 1930, 1980
    Contains Hebrew.   
4 11 1860 Dedication of 19th Street Synagogue undated, 1931
4 12 Anniversaries, 17th Street and Central Park West Synagogue 1931, 1937, 1957, 1972
    Contains Hebrew.   
4 13 George Washington, Anniversaries 1932, 1939
4 14 100th Anniversary, Crosby Street Synagogue 1934
Box Folder Title Date
5 1 280th and 283rd Anniversary 1935, 1938
5 2 Moses Maimonides, Anniversaries 1935, 1955
5 3 450th Anniversary of the Discovery of America 1942
5 4 Tercentenary Anniversary 1952, 1954-1955
5 5 Tercentenary, Service of Reconsecration 1954
    Contains Hebrew.   
5 6 26th Anniversary, State of Israel 1974
5 7 American Bicentennial Celebration 1975-1976
    Contains Hebrew.   

Subseries C: Religious Celebrations, 1918-1919, 1929-1930, 1932-1937, 1939, 1942, 1944

English.
Box 5, Folders 8-10.
Arrangement:

Folders are arranged chronologically according to the first date listed.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains invitations and programs to Hanukkah, Succoth, and Purim parties held by the Congregation.

Box Folder Title Date
5 8 Purim Celebrations 1918-1919, 1929, 1932, 1934, 1936, 1942
5 9 Succoth Party 1930
5 10 Hanukkah Celebrations 1932-1933, 1935-1937, 1939, 1944
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Series VI: Education, undated, 1903, 1908, 1917-1918, 1928, 1932, 1947, 1954, 1957-1958, 1960-1965, 1967, 1995-1996

English
Box 5, Folder 11-14.
Arrangement:

Folders are arranged chronologically according to the first date listed.

Scope and Content:

Announcements, invitations, an address, raffle tickets, and programs concerning children and adult education programs held at the Synagogue are found in this series. Box 5, Folder 11 is dedicated to programs and announcements for a lecture series for adults. Box 5, Folder 12 includes an invitation and program commemorating the centenary of Polonies Talmud Torah School, an announcement of a home tutor, invitations to attend various celebrations, and an undated address by Hon. Edgar J. Nathan, Jr. titled "The Call for Religious Education." Box 5, Folder 13 contains solely a program of a Fair sponsored by the Young People's Group. Box 5, Folder 14 includes invitations and raffle tickets to a Bazaar sponsored by the Parents Council as well as invitations to sponsored Seudah Shelisheeths.

See also:

(Lecture Series): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries C: Education; Series VII: Societies, Subseries D: Sephardic House

(Polonies Talmud Torah School): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries C: Education; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries A: Discontinued Publications; Subseries C: Bulletin

Box Folder Title Date
5 11 Lecture Series undated, 1903, 1917-1918, 1932, 1954, 1960-1965, 1967, 1995-1996
5 12 Polonies Talmud Torah School undated, 1908, 1928, 1954
5 13 Young People's Group 1947
5 14 Parents Council 1954, 1957-1958, 1962
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Series VII: Societies, undated, 1899, 1901, 1903, 1905-1906, 1909-1919, 1921, 1923-1940, 1942-1945, 1954-1960, 1965, 1968, 1974, 1978-1994

English.
Box 5, Folders 15-20; Box 6, Folders 1-7; Oversized folder OS1F 2.
Arrangement:

Subseries are arranged by subject.

Scope and Content:

This series contains material concerning the Junior League, Shearith Israel Sisterhood, Sheairth Israel League, Men's Club, and Sephardic House. Subseries are divided as follows: Subseries A: Shearith Israel Sisterhood; Subseries B: Shearith Israel League; Subseries C: Men's Club; and Subseries D: Sephardic House.

Subseries A: Shearith Israel Sisterhood, undated, 1899, 1901, 1903, 1905-1906, 1909-1919, 1921, 1928, 1932-1934, 1937, 1957-1960

English
Box 5, Folders 15-20, Oversized Folder OS1F 2.
Arrangement:

Folders are arranged chronologically according to the first date listed.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains announcements, invitations, programs, addresses, and reports concerning the Junior League and Shearith Israel Sisterhood. Box 5, Folder 15 consists of entertainment programs for the Junior League of the Shearith Israel Sisterhood. Box 5, Folder 16 includes invitations and programs for events, appeals for camp funds, and two addresses made by Sisterhood members. Box 5, Folder 17 contains announcements and souvenir programs for Fairs sponsored by the Sisterhood in 1905 and 1911. Box 5, Folder 18 and Folder 19 contain annual, treasurer, and probation committee reports for select years. Box 5, Folder 20 consists of invitations and programs for the consecration of Neighborhood House, as well as a pamphlet describing the activities and facilities of the settlement house. Oversized Folder OS1F 2 contains an article titled, "Our Neighbor-Friends," published by Alice Davis Menken, President of the Sisterhood. Among the Sisterhood members mentioned in this subseries are Alice Davis Menken, Rosalie Solomons Phillips, Rosalie Lopez de Samuel Piza Mendes, and Rebecca L. Elias.

See also:

(Alice Davis Menken): Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Sisterhood): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries D: Societies; Series IV: Clergy; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries A: Discontinued Publications; Subseries C: Bulletin

Box Folder Title Date
5 15 Junior League of the Shearith Israel Sisterhood 1899, 1901, 1906
5 16 Shearith Israel Sisterhood undated, 1903, 1911, 1913, 1915, 1932-1933, 1937, 1957-1960
5 17 Shearith Israel Sisterhood, Fair undated, 1905, 1911
5 18 Shearith Israel Sisterhood, Annual Reports 1909-1915, 1918-1919, 1928, 1934
5 19 Shearith Israel Sisterhood, Probation Committee Reports 1912-1919
5 20 Shearith Israel Sisterhood, Neighborhood House 1913, 1918-1919
Box Folder Title Date
OSF1 2 "Our Neighbor-Friends," by Alice D. Menken, President, Shearith Israel Sisterhood 1921

Subseries B: Shearith Israel League, undated, 1923-1940, 1943, 1945, 1958, 1965, 1984, 1992

English.
Box 6, Folders 1-3.
Arrangement:

Folders are arranged chronologically according to the first date listed.

Scope and Content:

This subseries consists of announcements, invitations, advertisements, a constitution, informative pamphlets, a souvenir journal, and bulletins published by the Shearith Israel League. Box 6, Folder 1 includes announcements and invitations to events, a constitution, general informative pamphlets concerning the League and the Congregation, a souvenir journal for the 1992 dinner dance, and advertisements for phonograph records of music of Shearith Israel. Box 6, Folders 2-3 contains issues of the Shearith Israel League Bulletin, from 1925-1940. The Bulletin contains Congregational news, Society activities, educational programs, events sponsored by the League, and messages written by Presidents of the League, Presidents of the Congregation, and the Congregation's Ministers.

See also:

(Ministers): Series II: Histories; Series IV: Clergy; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

Box Folder Title Date
6 1 Shearith Israel League undated, 1923-1927, 1930-1931, 1933-1938, 1940, 1943, 1945, 1958, 1965, 1984, 1992
6 2 Shearith Israel League Bulletin 1925-1934
6 3 Shearith Israel League Bulletin 1935-1940

Subseries C: Men's Club, undated, 1937, 1942, 1944, 1954-1958, 1960, 1968

English.
Box 6, Folder 4.
Arrangement:

This subseries consists of one folder.

Scope and Content:

This subseries consists of announcements, invitations, and programs to events and lectures and a pamphlet issued by the Men's Club. Among the items within this folder is a 1944 pamphlet titled "Our Sons Speak," a collection of letters from soldiers who are members of Shearith Israel. Announcements, invitations, and programs include Memorial Day at Chatham Square Cemetery, interfaith meetings, the annual dinner dance, and various lectures and addresses.

See also:

(Chatham Square Cemetery): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries A: Administration; Subseries E: Cemetery; Series VIII: Chatham Square Cemetery; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(World War II Activities): Series IX: War Activities

Box Folder Title Date
6 4 Men's Club undated, 1937, 1942, 1944, 1954-1958, 1960, 1968

Subseries D: Sephardic House, undated, 1974, 1978-1994

English.
Box 6, Folders 5-7, Oversized Folder OSF1 2.
Arrangement:

Folders are arranged chronologically according to the first date listed.

Scope and Content:

This subseries consists of announcements, invitations, calendars, press releases, brochures, advertisements, programs, a pamphlet, and newsletters issued by Sephardic House. Box 6, Folder 5 contains material regarding cultural events organized by Sephardic House, including its opening in 1978. Advertisements for books, tapes, and videos are also found in this folder, as well as two Jewish calendars, a general brochure, a brochure outlining tours to Turkey, and press releases. Box 6, Folder 6 consists of programs for Adult Jewish Studies and invitations to additional conferences and discussions. Box 6, Folder 6 also includes a pamphlet written by Rabbi Marc D. Angel, titled "Thoughts About Prayer," based upon a series of seminars held in 1983. Newsletters issued by Sephardic House from 1980-1994 are available in Box 6, Folder 7.

See also:

(Marc D. Angel): Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Lecture Series): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries C: Education; Series VI: Education

(Sephardic History): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries B: Services and Celebrations; Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries B: Anniversary Services and Celebrations; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries B: Calendars; Subseries C: Bulletin

Box Folder Title Date
6 5 Sephardic House undated, 1974, 1978-1981, 1983-1984, 1987, 1989, 1991-1993
   

(oversized item in OSF1 2)

 
6 6 Sephardic House, Educational Programs 1978, 1980-1984, 1987, 1989, 1991
6 7 Sephardic House, Newsletter 1980-1994
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Series VIII: Chatham Square Cemetery, undated, 1903, 1929, 1932, 1938, 1943, 1947-1948, 1950-1951, 1954, 1966, 1982

English.
Box 6, Folder 8.
Arrangement:

This series consists of one folder.

Scope and Content:

This series contains brochures, invitations, programs, and newsclippings concerning various memorial services and dedications conducted at the historic Chatham Square Cemetery. In addition to services in honor of Memorial Day, the folder contains material regarding a tablet dedication by the American Scenic and Historic Preservation Society and the American Jewish Historical Society that took place in 1903; and tablet dedications commemorating five Revolutionary War patriots that occurred in 1932, through the Manhattan Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution.

See also:

(Chatham Square Cemetery): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries A: Administration; Subseries E: Chatham Square Cemetery; Series VII: Societies, Subseries C: Men's Club; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Revolutionary War): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries A: Administration; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

Box Folder Title Date
6 8 Chatham Square Cemetery, Memorial Services 1903, 1929, 1932, 1938, 1943, 1947-1948, 1950-1951, 1954, 1966, 1982
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Series IX: War Activities, undated, 1914, 1916-1919, 1936-1938, 1941-1943, 1945

English, Dutch.
Box 6, Folders 9-11.
Arrangement:

Folders are arranged chronologically according to the first date listed.

Scope and Content:

This series contains invitations, notices, fundraising appeals, sermons, pastoral letters, resolutions, orders of service, and a hymn pertaining to the Congregation's response and activities to World War I and World War II. Box 6, Folder 10 is dedicated to the Women's League of Congregation Shearith Israel for War Relief, which among its fundraising duties organized a patriotic parade during World War I. Among the items in Box 6, Folder 11, World War II Activities, are an appeal for volunteer service for civilian defense and an invitation half in English and half in Dutch to attend a "Service of Prayer for the Suffering People of the Netherlands and other occupied countries." Ministers represented in this series are H. Pereira Mendes and David De Sola Pool.

See also:

(Henry Pereira Mendes): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries C: Education; Series IV: Clergy; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(David De Sola Pool): Series IV: Clergy; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(World War II Activities): Series VII: Societies, Subseries C: Men's Club

Box Folder Title Date
6 9 World War I activities undated, 1914, 1916-1919
6 10 Women's League of Congregation Shearith Israel for War Relief (WWI) undated
6 11 World War II activities undated, 1936-1938, 1941-1943, 1945
    Contains Dutch.   
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Series X: Synagogue Publications, 1905, 1908-1909, 1912-1914, 1922-1930, 1932-1996

English.
Box 7-Box 10.
Arrangement:

Folders are arranged chronologically according to the first date listed.

Scope and Content:

This series consists of publications issued by the Synagogue, Society publications are located in Series VII: Societies. The series is divided into three subseries: Subseries A: Discontinued Publications; Subseries B: Calendars; and Subseries C: Bulletin.

Subseries A: Discontinued Publications, 1905, 1908-1909, 1913

English, Hebrew.
Box 7, Folders 1-3.
Scope and Content:

This subseries includes several publications no longer in issuance by the congregation.

Box 7, Folder 1 contains The Shearith Israel Review, the "congregational newspaper" (Vol. 1, No. 3 and No. 5, Vol. II, No. 1). Vol. II, No. 1 was issued for the 250th anniversary.

Box 7, Folder 2 consists of a bound volume titled Congregation Shearith Israel and Mikve Israel. The volume is a compilation of pamphlets and includes an order of service in commemoration of the 250th Anniversary of the Congregation; a paper by David de Sola Pool titled "The Mill Street Synagogue;" the 250th Anniversary issue of The Shearith Israel Review; "Books of Jewish Interest" published as a 1913 University of Illinois Bulletin; the 1908 Yearbook; and "Dedication of the New Synagogue of Congregation Mikve Israel at Broad and York Streets on September 14 1909 Elul 29 5669." The last pamphlet on Mikve Israel contains an historical sketch written by A.S.W. Rosenbach and an Order of Service.

Box 7, Folder 3 contains four copies of the 1908Yearbook. The Yearbook includes an historical summary, reports by the President and Minister, reports for each Society, a list of Congregational Clubs, and weekly and annual calendars.

See also:

(Calendars): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries B: Services and Celebrations; Series III: Administration; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries B: Calendars

(Hebra Hased Va Amet): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries D: Societies; Series III: Administration

(Histories): Series II: Histories; Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries B: Anniversary Services and Celebrations; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Mill Street Synagogue): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries A: Administration; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Polonies Talmud Torah School): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries C: Education; Series VI: Education; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(Sisterhood): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries D: Societies; Series IV: Clergy; Series VII: Societies, Subseries A: Shearith Israel Sisterhood; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

(250th Anniversary): Series III: Administration; Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries B: Anniversary Services and Celebrations

Box Folder Title Date
7 1 The Shearith Israel Review 1905
7 2 Congregation Shearith Israel and Mikve Israel 1905, 1908-1909, 1913
    Contains Hebrew.   
7 3 Yearbook 1908

Subseries B: Calendars, 1925-1930, 1932-1945, 1954-1955, 1968-1970, 1975-1976, 1980-1991

English
Box 7, Folders 4-6.
Arrangement:

Folders are arranged chronologically according to the first date listed.

Scope and Content:

This subseries consists of weekly and annual calendars issued by Shearith Israel. Box 7, Folder 4 contains an incomplete range of annual calendars for the Synagogue, dating from 1925 until 1955. Box 7, Folder 5 includes weekly calendars, dating primarily from 1936-1944, with two mailers covering the weeks October 11, 18, and 25, 1980 and November 27, December 4, and 11, 1982. Box 7, Folder 6 contains "Diary and World-Wide Directory of Sephardic Congregations," and dates from 1968-1991, with gaps.

See also:

(Calendars): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries B: Services and Celebrations; Series III: Administration; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries A: Discontinued Publications

(Sephardic History): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries B: Services and Celebrations; Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries B: Anniversary Services and Celebrations; Series VII: Societies, Subseries D: Sephardic House; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries C: Bulletin

Box Folder Title Date
7 4 Annual calendars 1925-1930, 1932-1937, 1941-1942, 1944-1945, 1954-1955
7 5 Weekly Calendars 1936-1944, 1980, 1982
7 6 Diary and International Directory of Sephardic Congregations 1968-1970, 1975-1976, 1981-1991

Subseries C: Bulletin, 1912-1914, 1922-1925, 1939, 1941-1996

English.
Boxes 8-10.
Scope and Content:

Issues of the Bulletin begin with Vol. 1, No. 1, and with gaps, continue until 1996. Bulletins contain congregational and Society news, calendars, messages from Ministers and Trustee members, and Parashah commentaries. Articles concerning historical information describing Shearith Israel's past are included in many of the Bulletins. Several sermons and addresses by Ministers were also published in the Bulletin. Following is an index of articles and sermons/addresses by Ministers as well as historical articles that can be found within the Bulletin in this subseries. The index is listed by name in alphabetically order. Articles under each name or heading are listed in chronological order.

Marc D. Angel
"Celebrating-The Jewish Way" (March 1981)
"Tsedakah is More Than Charity" (March 1984)
"In Search of Moral Perfection" (May 1987)
"Thoughts for the High Holy Days" (September-October 1988)
"High Holy Day Message" (September-October 1989)
"High Holy Days Message" (September-October 1990)
"Sephardic Customs as Reflections of a Religious Worldview" (October-December 1990)
"Rosh Hashanah Message" (September 1991)
"Spiritual Estate Planning: High Holy Day Message" (September-October 1992)
"Holiday Message" (September 1994)
"Thoughts for the High Holy Days" (September 1995)
Additional articles written by Marc D. Angel are listed under Historical Articles.

A. Lopes Cardozo
"The Origins of Jewish Music" (May 6, 1966)
Biographical sketch upon retirement (June 1984)

Solomon Solis Cohen
"The Sephardic Jews of America" (March 1972)

Haham Solomon Gaon
Welcoming biographical sketch (December 20, 1963)
New Years' Messages (September 4, 1964, September 24, 1965)
"The Nature of Jewish Concepts" (April 22, 1966)
"Sephardic Education" (January 13, 1967)

Louis C. Gerstein
"Education for Life" (June 3, 1966)
"The Way to a Better Life" (December 16, 1966)
"The Purpose of the Sanctuary" (March 3, 1967)
"In Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." (April 26, 1968)
"Salute to Denmark and Sweden" (January 10, 1969)
"What is the Role of the Synagogue?" (March 13, 1970)
"Israel Revisited: Looking Toward 5731" (September 1970)
"Freedom: The Ongoing Quest for Mankind" (April 1970)
"Choose Life-How?" (November 1970)
"Dreams and Realities" (February 1971)
"Today's Need: Flexibility or Firmness?" (April 1971)
"The Questions We Should Ask Ourselves" (September 1971)
"Is There Still Hope?" (September 1972)
"Is This a Time for Disillusionment?" (September 1973)
"A Time for Heroism" (September 1974)
"Shearith Israel and the Bicentennial Year" (September 1975)
"A Time for Heroism" (September 1976)
"A Time for Renewal" (October 1978)
"Guideposts in Troubled Times" (September 1979)
"Constancy In the Pursuit of Good" (September-October 1982)
"What Do We Want Out of Life?" (September 1983)
"The Call to Conscience" (June-September 1985)
"Reaching Out to New Horizons" (October 1986)
Notice of Retirement (May-June 1988)

Henry Pereira Mendes
"Rev. Dr. Henry Pereira Mendes," by N. Taylor Phillips (January 1972)
"Consecration Address-1897" (April 1972)
"Letter to A Newlywed" (October 1975)

Yitzhak Nissim
"Message from the Chief Rabbi" (May 24, 1968)

David De Sola Pool
Radio broadcast upon Franklin D. Roosevelt's death (April 1945)
"World Sephardic Congress" (December 7, 1951)
"The Synagogue for Today" (March 16, 1962)
Biographical article (May 1970)
Funeral Services (December 1970)
"The Synagogue in a World of Transition" (February 1972)
"Preface to Portraits Etched in Stone" (May-June 1981)
"Rev. Dr. David De Sola Pool; A Talk by Victor Tarry" (February-March 1989)
"The Sabbath" (February 1995)
Additional articles written by David De Sola Pool are listed under Historical Articles.

Historical Articles
"Women's Work in Shearith Israel" (February 14, 1947)
"Our Congregational Societies, The Sisterhood" (February 13, 1948)
"The Sermons of Gershom Mendes Seixas" (January 28, 1949)
"We Did it Then" [Mill Street Synagogue Dedication] (April 29, 1949)
"Anniversary of Mordecai M. Noah" (May 18, 1951)
"Pre-History of Our Sisterhood" (February 1, 1952)
"The Y.W.H.A. Jubilee (February 29, 1952)
"A Century and a Half Ago" [Polonies Talmud Torah School] (March 14, 1952)
"Tercentenary Newsletter" (December 18, 1953-May 6, 1955)
"The Sephardim," by Cecil Roth (December 30, 1966)
"The Jews in Spain Since 1900 (February 3 and 17, 1967)
"Sephardim of France" (March 17 and 31, 1967)
"The Sephardim of Holland" (May 5 and 19, 1967)
"The Jews of Yugoslavia" (November 17, 1967)
"Sephardim in England Today" (December 1, 1967)
"The Minhagim of Italy" (December 22, 1967)
"The Sephardim in Gilbraltar Today" (January 5, 1968)
"The Siddur" (January 19, 1968)
"The Sephardi in Shipping" (February 2, 1968)
"The Tiniest Synagogue in the World" [Seville, Spain] (March 8, 1968)
"The Cup is Half-Full in Seville" (June 7, 1968)
"The Jews of the Western Hemisphere," by Cecil Roth (October 25, 1968)
"History of Shearith Israel in Montreal" (December 13 and 27, 1968)
"Petah Tikva: Anshe Castilla Congregation of Toronto" (January 24, 1969)
"History of the Jews in Rochester" (February 28, 1969)
"The Congregation Mikveh Israel in the City of Philadelphia" (March 14, 1969)
"The Sephardic Congregation of Long Beach, New York" (October 17, 1969)
"Judah Abrabanel" (October 31, 1969)
"The Centenary of the Montefiore College" (November 14, 1969)
"Abraham Bar Hiyya" (November 28, 1969)
"Arthur Wing Pinero" (December 12, 1969)
"Nahmanides" (December 26, 1969)
"Samuel Ibn Nagrela" (January 16, 1970)
"Spanish Biblical Translations" (January 30, 1970)
"Joseph Hakohen" (February 13, 1970)
"Moses Maimonides" (February 27, 1970)
"Rembrandt and the Jews" (April 3, 1970)
"Yehudah Halevi and Jean Racine" (April 1970)
"Thanksgiving Day at Shearith Israel," by Marc D. Angel (November 1970)
"The Magic of the Me'am Lo'ez" (January 1971)
"The Mill Street Synagogue," by David De Sola Pool (March 1971)
"The Perpetual List of Hashcaboth," by Marc D. Angel (May 1971, December-January 1990/1991)
"From our Minute Books" (May 1971)
"Mordecai Manuel Noah," by Marc D. Angel (October 1971)
"The Seventieth Street Synagogue," by David De Sola Pool (November 1971)
"The Sisterhood," by Marc D. Angel (December 1971)
"Gershom Mendes Seixas," by Marc D. Angel (May-June 1972)
"Asser Levy, Shearith Israel's Connecting Link" (October 1972)
"Gastronomy in the 17th and 18th Centuries of Shearith Israel" (November 1972)
"Messianism Among the Sephardim in the Spanish Colonies" (January 1973)
"Notes on Shearith Israel History" [founding of first Jewish communal institutions in New York] (February 1973)
"Sephardic Jews Unite at Founding Convention of American Sephardic Federation" (March 1973)
"The Jews of Florence" (May-June 1973)
"Jewish Life in Greece" (October 1973)
"Treasures of the Little Synagogue" (November 1973)
"Birobizhan: From Autonomy to a Ghost Town" (February 1974)
"Levantine Jewish Immigration to the United States," by Marc D. Angel (April 1974)
"Some Customs of Rhodes Jews" (October 1974)
"Some Notes on the Touro Synagogue," by David De Sola Pool (November 1974)
"Notes on Early History of Seattle's Sephardim," by Marc D. Angel (December 1974)
"History of Congregation Or VeShalom in Atlanta" (January 1975)
"DeSola and Mikveh Israel" (February 1975)
"A Glimpse at Our Past" (April 1975)
"Unwritten History," by N. Taylor Phillips [early beginnings of Shearith Israel] (November 1975)
"The Jewish Community and Self-Help," by Marc D. Angel (December 1975)
"Letter from Gershom Mendes Seixas" (February 1976)
"Hebrew in Early American Education" (March 1976)
"Baghdad-Customs and Cooking" (October 1976)
"Alice Davis Menken, Social Work Pioneer" (November 1976)
"State of Connecticut, By Her Excellency Ella Grasso, Governor: An Official Statement" (December 1976)
"Sephardic Immigration," Cyrus Adler (January 1977)
"In Honor of the 175th Birthday of the Polonies Talmud Torah School" (May-June 1977)
"Congregation Shearith Israel of Charleston, South Carolina" (October 1977)
"The Shearith Israel Religious School," by Marc D. Angel (December 1977)
"Remarks by Mayor Edward I. Koch at Annual Memorial Ceremony at Cemetery of Shearith Israel..." (September 1978)
"Jewish Lawyers in City's Revolutionary War Period" (February 1980)
"Rabbi Yehudah Alkalai: Forerunner of Zionism," by Marc D. Angel (January-February 1984)
"The Influence of the Portuguese Jews of Holland on Shearith Israel" (June-September 1990)
"Notes from the Archives, Sisterhood" (October-November 1991)
"Notes from the Archives, The Sisterhood's Work with the Sephardim" (June-September 1992)
"Notes from the Archives, The Sisterhood" (January 1994)

See also:

(Marc D. Angel): Series VII: Societies, Subseries D: Sephardic House

(Abraham Lopes Cardozo): Series IV: Clergy

(Chatham Square Cemetery): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries A: Administration; Subseries E: Chatham Square Cemetery; Series VII: Societies, Subseries C: Men's Club; Series VIII: Chatham Square Cemetery

(Forms of Service and Prayers): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries B: Services and Celebrations

(Solomon Gaon): Series IV: Clergy

(Louis C. Gerstein): Series IV: Clergy

(Histories): Series II: Histories; Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries B: Anniversary Services and Celebrations; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries A: Discontinued Publications

(Ladies' Aid Society): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries D: Societies; Series IV: Clergy

(Memorials for Late Presidents and State Figures): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries B: Services and Celebrations; Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries A: Religious Services, Jewish and Secular

(Henry Pereira Mendes): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries C: Education; Series IV: Clergy; Series IX: War Activities

(Alice Davis Menken): Series VII: Societies, Subseries A: Shearith Israel Sisterhood

(Mill Street Synagogue): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries A: Administration; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries A: Discontinued Publications

(Ministers): Series II: Histories; Series IV: Clergy; Series VII: Societies, Subseries B: Shearith Israel League

(Polonies Talmud Torah School): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries C: Education; Series VI: Education; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries A: Discontinued Publications

(David De Sola Pool): Series IV: Clergy; Series IX: War Activities

(Revolutionary War): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries A: Administration; Series VIII: Chatham Square Cemetery

(Sephardic History): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries B: Services and Celebrations; Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries B: Anniversary Services and Celebrations; Series VII: Societies, Subseries D: Sephardic House; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries B: Calendars

(Sisterhood): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries D: Societies; Series IV: Clergy; Series VII: Societies, Subseries A: Shearith Israel Sisterhood; Series X: Synagogue Publications, Subseries A: Discontinued Publications

(Thanksgiving Day Services): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries B: Services and Celebrations; Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries A: Religious Services, Jewish and Secular

(Trustee Records): Series I: Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Material, Subseries A: Administration; Series III: Administration; Series IV: Clergy; Series V: Services and Celebrations, Subseries B: Anniversary Services and Celebrations

Box Folder Title Date
8 1 Bulletin 1912-1914, 1922-1925
8 2 Bulletin 1939, 1941-1949
8 3 Bulletin 1950-1952
8 4 Bulletin 1953-1955
8 5 Bulletin 1956-1958
8 6 Bulletin 1959-1961
Box Folder Title Date
9 1 Bulletin 1962-1964
9 2 Bulletin 1965-1967
9 3 Bulletin 1968-1970
9 4 Bulletin 1971- 1972
9 5 Bulletin 1973-1974
9 6 Bulletin 1975-1976
Box Folder Title Date
10 1 Bulletin 1977-1978
10 2 Bulletin 1979-1980
10 3 Bulletin 1981-November 1982
10 4 Bulletin December 1982/January 1983-November 1984
10 5 Bulletin December 1984/January 1985-1986
10 6 Bulletin 1987-1988
10 7 Bulletin 1989-1990
10 8 Bulletin 1991-1992
10 9 Bulletin 1993-1994
10 10 Bulletin 1995-1996
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Separated Oversized Material, undated, 1771, 1801, 1818, 1856, 1921, 1980-1981

English.
OSF1 Folders 1-3, OSF2 Folder 1, MAP 1
Box Folder Title Date
OSF1 1 Forms of Service and Prayers for various occasions 1856
OSF1 2 "Our Neighbor-Friends," by Alice D. Menken, President, Shearith Israel Sisterhood; "Jewish Home Calendar" (separated from Box 6, Folder 5) 1921, 1980-1981
OSF1 3 Statement of the funds of the Congregation and List of Offerings, third quarter November 22, 1801 and 1818
Box Folder Title Date
OSF2 1 Plan of Auditorium Seats undated
Box Folder Title Date
MAP 1 Indenture for land adjoining Jews' Burying Ground, N.Y. 1771
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