Guide to the Papers of Franz Rosenzweig (1886-1929),
1832-1999

AR 3001

Processed by Stanislav Pejša

Leo Baeck Institute

Center for Jewish History

15 West 16th Street

New York, N.Y. 10011

Phone: (212) 744-6400

Fax: (212) 988-1305

Email: http://www.lbi.org/ask

URL: http://www.lbi.org

© 2003 Leo Baeck Institute. All rights reserved.
Center for Jewish History, Publisher.
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Descriptive Summary

Creator: Rosenzweig, Franz, 1886-1929
Title: Franz Rosenzweig Collection
Dates:1832-1999
Abstract: Franz Rosenzweig (1886-1929), philosopher and theologian, belonged to the important personalities of the German Jewish intellectual life after the First World War. Franz Rosenzweig started the , where he tried to teach Jewish tradition and culture as part of real life experience and in this way bring it closer to assimilated German Jewry. He wrote several philosophical works and translated the Hebrew Bible with Martin Buber. The Franz Rosenzweig collection contains manuscripts of many of Franz Rosenzweig’s smaller works, some of his personal items, and correspondence with his parents and with more than fifty of his friends and colleagues. The collection contains other correspondence, and a great number of newspaper clippings, photographs, and some objects.
Languages: The collection is in German, Hebrew, and Judeo-German. There is also some Latin and Greek.
Quantity: 4 linear feet
Accession number: AR 3001
Repository: Leo Baeck Institute
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Biographical Note

Franz Rosenzweig was born in Kassel on December 25, 1886 to Georg and Adele Rosenzweig. His father was a relatively successful local businessmen who was publicly active. He was a member of the Municipal Council in Kassel, sat on boards of many institutions, among them the Jewish orphanage in Kassel. His mother, Adele Rosenzweig neé Alsberg, was the third of six children and after her marriage managed to keep in their household a liberal and open atmosphere.

In 1905 Franz Rosenzweig graduated from the Friedrichsgymnasium in Kassel and started to study medicine in Göttingen. After changing universities several times, in 1908 he left the sciences and started to study philosophy and history. After studies in Berlin he went to Freiburg im Breisgau where he studied with Friedrich Meinecke. After another stay in Berlin, Franz Rosenzweig came back to Freiburg i. B. and finished his studies with the dissertation " Hegel und Staat" (Hegel and State). In 1913 he studied in Berlin with Hermann Cohen, who resigned from the Philosophy Department at Marburg University and started to teach Jewish Philosophy of Religion at Akademie für die Wissenschaft des Judemtums (School of Science of Judaism) in Berlin.

In 1914 Franz Rosenzweig volunteered with the Red Cross and served on several fronts, After serving in Belgium and Germany, Franz Rosenzweig was assigned to the Balkans in 1916, where he stayed until almost the war’s end.

During the war he diligently read and worked on his texts, so that he was able to publish several philosophical works, including Das älteste Systemprogramm des deutschen Idealismus, and his letters to his teacher Hermann Cohen from the front in Zeit ist’s, both in 1917. Shortly after the war his dissertation Hegel und Staat appeared in print in two volumes in 1920. However, he is probably best known for another work, Der Stern der Erlösung (The Star of Redemption), published in 1921.

In the summer of 1920 he lectured in Kassel. He married Edith Hahn on March 23, 1920 and they moved to Frankfurt am Main.

Although he contemplated conversion to Christianity for a period, he rejected this course and returned to Judaism with increasing commitment. In 1920 Franz Rosenzweig, together with Nehemiah A. Nobel, Martin Buber, and others (among them also Erich Fromm), founded the Freie Juedische Lehrhaus in Frankfurt am Main, where Franz Rosenzweig tried to promote new educational methods based on real life experience. This institution was open for everyone without regard to denomination and people were accepted freely without entry exams or references. Next to Franz Rosenzweig and Martin Buber, Richard Koch, Eduard Strauss, Ernst Simon, and Siegfried Krakauer were teaching at the Lehrhaus, as did Nahum N. Glatzer later.

Franz Rosenzweig also successfully translated and commented upon the medieval liturgical texts and poems of Jehuda Halevi in 1924 and collaborated with Martin Buber on a translation of the Hebrew Bible Die Schrift (The Book) in 1926.

In January 1922, Franz Rosenzweig became ill with a quickly progressing paralysis (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis), which soon prevented him from writing. From this point on, all his correspondence and works were dictated. At the end of 1923, Franz Rosenzweig almost lost his ability to speak and had to use a specially constructed type-machine. He became so weak that his wife Edith Rosenzweig had to communicate with him through gestures and signs. In October 1922 Rudolf Hallo took over the leadership of the Lehrhaus. It stayed open until 1930, and was reopened by Martin Buber in 1933.

Franz Rosenzweig died on December 10, 1929.

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Scope and Content Note

The bulk of this collection is created from two independent donations that were mutually supplementary, and for the researcher’s convenience it was only sensible to consolidate these two important collections into one. The donation of Nahum Glatzer, a professor at Vanderbilt University, contained many of the manuscripts of Franz Rosenzweig, some of the family materials, the book reviews of Franz Rosenzweig’s books, and Franz Rosenzweig’s personal items. The other gift was donated by the son of Franz Rosenzweig and Edith Rosenzweig-Scheinmann Raphael Rosenzweig. It contained correspondence with various friends and colleagues of Franz Rosenzweig, including the correspondence with his wife as well as the originals of congratulations to Franz Rosenzweig on his 40th birthday in 1926. Both collections had files with necrologies, obituaries and commemorative articles. There are a considerable amount of materials and documents scattered throughout the holdings of the LBI Library and Archives that relate to Franz Rosenzweig, some of them as independent collections, and some as specialized collections, i.e. Art Collection and Photo Collection.

Series I: Personal holds various personal items of Franz Rosenzweig, including originals and a facsimile of the 40th birthday album presented to Franz Rosenzweig on his fortieth birthday, which includes testimonials from S. Y. Agnon, Hermann Badt, Bertha Badt-Strauss, Fritz Goitein, and Jacob Rosenheim. The obituaries and commemorative articles are also to be found here.

Series II: Writings contains manuscripts, including Franz Rosenzweig’s diaries, drafts of his publications, lectures for the Freie Juedische Lehrhaus (The Free Jewish House of Teaching) and other institutions, and his papers from his university studies in Freiburg im Breisgau and Berlin. Another substantial part of this series are reviews of Franz Rosenzweig’s works.

Series III: Correspondence may be of special interest to researchers, since it contains letters to Franz Rosenzweig from such colleagues as Leo Baeck, Isaac Breuer, Martin Buber, Joseph Carlebach, Karl D. Darmstaedter, Max Dienemann, Richard Ehrenberg, Victor Ehrenberg, Nahum Glatzer, Margarete Goldstein, Oscar Loerke, Eugen Mayer, Friedrich Meinecke, Alfred Mombert, Hermann Oncken, Eugen Rosenstock-Huessy, Fritz Schwarzschild, Caesar Seligmann, Ernst Simon, Rudolf Stahl, Bruno Strauss, Eduard Strauss, Margaret Susman, Gershom Scholem, Karl Wolfskehl, and Arnold Zweig. Transcripts of Franz Rosenzweig’s letters to his parents Adele and Georg Rosenzweig written during the First World War and those to his wife Edith Rosenzweig are also to be found here.

Series IV: Family contains genealogies and histories of the Rosenzweig and Ehrenberg families; letters; photos of family members; diaries and memoirs of family members, including Adele Rosenzweig's memoirs of Franz's childhood.

Series V: Varia contains material that was not included into the original arrangement of the collection.

Series VI: Addenda holds material that arrived later and was not included into the already arranged collection.

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Arrangement

The collection is organized in six series.

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Access and Use

Access Restrictions

Open to researchers.

Use Restrictions

There may be some restrictions on the use of the collection. For more information, contact

Leo Baeck Institute
Center for Jewish History15 West 16th Street
New York, NY 10011
Phone: (212) 744-6400
Fax: (212) 988-1305
Email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org

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Access Points

Click on a subject to search that term in the Center's catalog. Return to the Top of Page

Related Material

Franz Rosenzweig-Martin Buber Collection at LBI (AR 4219)

Rosenzweig Family Collection at LBI (AR 410)

Ehrenberg-Rosenzweig Family Collection at LBI (AR 4584)

Glatzer Archives of Divinity Libary of the Vanderbilt University also holds considerable ammount of materials related to Franz Rosenzweig. http://divinity.library.vanderbilt.edu/glatzer/default.htm

The Martin Buber Archives at the Jewish National and University Library, Jerusalem also hold material that can be of interest to researchers.

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Separated Material

Photos were removed and placed in the Photo Collection.

The Plaquette of Hermann Cohen was removed to the Art Collection.

Published version of birthday album in LBI Library under the title: Franz Rosenzweig: zum 25. Dez. 1926; Glueckwuensche zum 40. Geburtstag; Congratulations to Franz Rosenzweig on his 40. birthday, 25 Dec.1926 are in the library of LBI [BM 42 R675]

The memoirs of Samuel Meier Ehrenberg "Meine Lebensbeschreibung" (ME 788) and the biography of Amelie Rosenzweig "Grossmutter Malchen. Vom Kind bis zur jungen Frau" (ME 789) were moved to the LBI Memoir Collection.

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Provenance

Edith Scheinmann-Rosenzweig, 1959-1960, 1980. N. Glatzer, 1973, 1974 LBI, 1990 Rudolf Stahl, 1993 (via William Hallo) William Hallo, 1996 Ruth Grunebaum Sondheimer, 1998 Bernhard Casper, October 12, 2000 (Addendum 5).

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Microfilm

Collection is microfilmed (except for 2/28a Die Sachverstaendigen, 1917), use MF 579. MF 579 Reels 1-8.

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Preferred Citation

Published citations should take the following form:

Identification of item, date (if known); Franz Rosenzweig Collection; AR 3001; box number; folder number; Leo Baeck Institute at the Center for Jewish History.

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Container List

The following section contains a detailed listing of the materials in the collection.

 

Series I: Personal, undated, 1904-1929

This series is in German.
0.4 linear feet
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

Personal papers of Franz Rosenzweig make up this series. Two sorts of material stand out. They are the texts for a festschrift published for Franz Rosenzweig’s 40th birthday in 1926 containing personal congratulations from many prominent German Jewish scholars. The other material that stands out are obituaries and commemorative articles, including reports by his physicians Richard Koch and Dr. Tuteur that document the last stages of Franz Rosenzweig’s illness.

The doctoral degree from the University in Freiburg im Breisgau is in this series, as well as Franz Rosenzweig’s ordination certificate after Leo Baeck ordained him a morenu (our teacher).

BoxFolderTitleDate
11Announcement of Teaching Appointmentundated
12Book Contract for Die Schrift und Luther1926
13Book Listundated
BoxFolderTitleDate
ROS 1Franz Rosenzweig zum 25. Dezember 19261926
BoxFolderTitleDate
14Franz Rosenzweig zum 25. Dezember 1926 - Master Proof of Facsimile1987
15Franz Rosenzweig zum 25. Dezember 1926 - Photocopy1926
16Franz Rosenzweig zum 25. Dezember 1926 - Typescripts1926
17Index of Franz Rosenzweigs Paper's1929
18Obituaries - Bound1929-1930
19Obituaries and Commemorative Articles1929-1969
110Obituaries and Commemorative Articles 1930-1956
BoxFolderTitleDate
ROS 1PhD Degree1917
BoxFolderTitleDate
111PhD Degree - Photocopy1917
112Photosundated, 1904-1917
BoxFolderTitleDate
ROS 1Ordination Certificate1922
BoxFolderTitleDate
113Ordination Certificate - Photocopy1917
114Simon, Ernst: "Juedische Bildungsmöglichkeiten in Frankfurt"1921
115Toast at the Wedding of Eva Sommer and Viktor Ehrenberg1919
116Tramer, Hans: “Franz Rosenzweig. Entwicklung und Leben”undated
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Series II: Writings, undated, 1905-1945

This series is in German and Hebrew.
2.6 linear feet
Arrangement:

Topical.

Scope and Content:

Subseries 1: Diaries contains the diaries of Franz Rosenzweig that he started to write when he began university in 1905 and wrote until he joined the army in 1914. In 1922, expecting an early death, he resumed writing his diary, but the progress of his illness prevented him from continuing. One of the notebooks also holds notes on the history of the family Rosenzweig. Unlike his earlier diaries, the later writings disclose personal thoughts of Franz Rosenzweig and reflections on his readings.

Subseries 2: Lectures and papers holds the papers of Franz Rosenzweig that he wrote during his university studies in Freiburg im Breisgau and Berlin, some of them annotated by his professors. Besides the university papers and some occasional lectures the subseries also contains lectures and drafts that Franz Rosenzweig prepared for the Freie Juedische Lehrhaus (The Free Jewish House of Teaching).

Subseries 3: Manuscripts holds manuscripts of Franz Rosenzweig’s philosophical, historical, theological, and philosophical texts. The researcher can find here drafts of his published dissertation Hegel und der Staat (Hegel and Sate), and a copy of Rosenzweig’s important work Der Stern der Erlösung (The Star of Redemption), with his own notes and corrections for the second edition. One can also see manuscripts of his smaller political pieces, that can be found gathered under the title Prolegomena zur Politik. Many of them are hand-written originals, others are typed. Especially interesting are the self-addressed letters from the war front from the year 1916. Filed here under the title Paralipomena, they were lost and reappeared only in March 1977.

Subseries 4: Reviews researchers can study this subseries to uncover the reaction of Franz Rosenzweig’s contemporaries to his works. Nearly seven hundred clippings or copies of articles are assembled in this subseries. The largest amount is reviews of Martin Buber’s and Franz Rosenzweig’s translation of the Bible.

Subseries I: Diaries, 1905-1922

This subseries is in German.
0.3 linear feet
Arrangement:

Alphabetical and further within folder chronological.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains the diaries of Franz Rosenzweig, covering the time period of 1905 through 1914, and the year 1922, both in originals and in typescripts. The original of the diary from May 10 through July 9, 1914 is lost and it is available only as typescript. The entries from November 8, 1907 through October 31, 1908 follow the notes on the history of the family Rosenzweig, that Franz Rosenzweig wrote down after conversations with his great uncle Adam Rosenzweig.

The earlier diaries contain just utterances and remarks and hardly anything personal, later Franz Rosenzweig started to note his impressions and reflections on interesting or challenging passages he was reading.

BoxFolderTitleDate
117Diaries I-II1905 Dec. 14 - 1906 Sept. 22
118Diaries III-IV1906 Sept. 29 - 1908 Mar. 4
119Diaries V-VII1910 Jul. 31 - 1922 Sept. 13
120Notebook "Alte Rosenzweigsche Familiennachrichten" and Diary1907 Nov. 17 - 1908 Oct. 31
121Typescripts - Diaries I-III, 1905 Dec. 14 - 1908 Mar. 4
122Typescripts - Diaries IV-V, VII and Notebook1908 Mar. 6 - 1922 Sept. 13

Subseries 2: Lectures and papers, undated, 1909?-1925

This subseries is in German.
0.5 linear feet
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains lectures and papers of Franz Rosenzweig. Some of them were written during Franz Rosenzweig’s university days in Freiburg im Breisgau and Berlin, and include annotations by his professors. These papers were most likely written in 1909-1910 when Franz Rosenzweig studied with Friedrich Mienecke. The arrangement of papers was maintained and often titled by Franz Rosenzweig. The donor of these papers, Nahum Glatzer, had these materials arranged according to their size. This arrangement was not preserved and manuscripts are now arranged by their genre.

In 1920 Franz Rosenzweig moved to Frankfurt am Rhein and founded the Freie Juedische Lehrhaus (The Free Jewish House of Teaching). His lectures from this institution are also to be found here together with other smaller lectures.

A) Freiburger Paper on Hegel

BoxFolderTitleDate
123Hegels Kritik der Reichsverfassung"undated
124Freiburger Referat über die Einleitung der Hegelschen Geschichtsphilosophie"undated
125Bemerkungen zu der 'Einleitung' von Hegels 'Philosophie der Geschichte' "undated
126Individual Pagesundated

B) Freiburger Paper on Kant

BoxFolderTitleDate
127Introduction (Einleitendes)undated
128Über das intellektualistische Moment in der Kantschen Ethik"undated
129Die verschiedenen Fassungen des kategorischen Imperativs bei Kant"undated
130Kants Lehre von der Typik der reinen praktischen Verknunft"undated
131Die Aufgabe einer transcendentalen Deduktion der Ideen in Kants K.d.r.V. Kritik der reinen Verknunft"undated
132Kant und die Lebensbedeutung des Ästhetischen"undated
133Zur transcendentalen Deduktion - Paper from Berlin"undated
134Notes and Individual Pages undated
BoxFolderTitleDate
135Notebookundated
136Wilhelm v. Humbold. Ein Versuch.undated
137W. v. Humboldts Denkschrift vom 4. II. 1819 und der Gedanke der politischen Individualität undated
138W. v. Humboldts Denkschrift vom 4. II. 1819 und der Gedanke der politischen Individualität - Notesundated

D) Lectures in Cassel

BoxFolderTitleDate
139Attendance Sheets1920
140Bible Studies - the 4th Book of Moses1920
141Glauben und Wissen1920
142Hebrew Class1920
143Der Jude im Staat1920
144Jüdische Geschichte in Rahmen der Weltgeschichte1920
145Das Wesen des Judentums1919?

E) Lectures of the Freie Juedische Lehrhaus, Frankfurt am Main

BoxFolderTitleDate
21Der juedische Mensch" - Draft1920
22Juedisches Denken1921
23Wissenschaft von der Welt1920/1921
24Wissenschaft von Gott1920/1921
25Wissenschaft von Menschen1920/1921
BoxFolderTitleDate
ROS 1Lecture Catalogs1922-1925
BoxFolderTitleDate
26Lecture Catalogs1921-1922

F) Other

BoxFolderTitleDate
27Das 18. Jahrhundert in seinem Verhältnis zum 19ten und zum 20tenundated
28Bibelkritik1921
29Geist und Epochen der jüdischen Geschichte1919?
210Grundriss des jüdischen Wissens - Draftundated
211Vom Geist des jüdischen Sprache - Draft1921?
212Zum Freiburger Referat über Friedrich Wilhelm IV.undated

Subseries III: Manuscripts, 1915?-1961

This subseries is in German.
0.8 linear feet
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

Franz Rosenzweig did not deal only with philosophical and theological issues of the relationship between Judaism and Christianity or relationships between Jewish and German identity, but also with broader historiographical problems and questions of the philosophy of history. In 1912 Franz Rosenzweig submitted his PhD thesis to Friedrich Meinecke in Freiburg im Breisgau. This work was published under the title Hegel und der Staat in two volumes in 1920. The manuscripts to many of his works can be found in this series. In 1921 Franz Rosenzweig’s most famous philosophical work, Der Stern der Erlösung (The Star of Redemption), was published. Even if this subseries mostly holds manuscripts of Franz Rosenzweig's earlier texts, this book is to be found here too.

Franz Rosenzweig translated with Martin Buber the Bible Die Schrift (1926) and liturgical texts and medieval poems by Jehuda Halevi. The texts that were created during the First World War are of political character. The original order was maintained. Under "Prolegomena to Politics" are collected smaller texts that dealt with political issues and that were mostly written during the year 1917. The texts are not dated, but the years were determined with the help of the critical edition of Franz Rosenzweig’s collected works Franz Rosenzweig: Der Mensch und sein Werk. Gesammelte Schriften. Volume 3. Zweistromland. Dordrecht 1984: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers and L. Anckaert and B. Casper: Franz Rosenzweig. A primary and secondary Bibliography. Leuven: 1990: Bibliotheek van den Fakulteit der Godgeleerdheid. “Globus – Studien zur weltgeschichtlichen Raumlehre“ were also written in 1917. Some of the texts are written under pseudonym.

The Paralipomena – collection of letters that Franz Rosenzweig addressed to himself from the front from January to September 1916 were originally lost, but reappeared in March 1977.

A) Das Büchlein vom gesunden und kranken Menschenverstand

BoxFolderTitleDate
213Bound Volumeundated
214Introduction by Nahum. N. Glatzerafter 1961
215Manuscript1921?

B) Globus – Studien zur weltgeschichtlichen Raumlehre

BoxFolderTitleDate
216Globus - Studien zur weltgeschichtlichen Raumlehre1917
217Introduction1917
218"Oekumene - Weltstaat und Staatenwelt"1917
219Oekumene - Weltstaat und Staatenwelt - Notebooks1917
220Thalatta - Seeherschaft und Meeresfreiheit1917
221Thalatta - Seeherschaft und Meeresfreiheit - Typescript1917

C) Prolegomena to Politics

BoxFolderTitleDate
222Krieg und Politikundated
223Kriegsziel1917
224Nordwest und Suedost1917
225Die neue Levante1917
226Neuorientierungundated
227Realpoltik1917
228Reichsverfassung in Krieg und Frieden1917
228aSachverständigen1917

D) Other

BoxFolderTitleDate
229Das älteste Systemprogramm des deutschen Idealismus1917
230Attische uns shakespearische Tragödieundated
231Baroque - Notesundated
232Bemerkungen zu der Hermann Cohenschen Schrift Judentum und Deutschtum1915?
233Bruchstueckeafter 1919
234Cannä und Gorlice1917-1918?
235Hegel und der Staat1920
236Held - Notes undated
237Hermann Cohens Nachlasswerk1921?
238Herosundated
239Paralipomena1916 - 1917
240Paralipomena - Letters 1-15, 17-211916
241Philippica1917
242Der Stern der Erlösung1921
243Der Stern der Erlösung - Outline1921
244Stories for Raphael Rosenzweigca. 1929
245Volksschule und Reichsschule 1916?
246Vox Dei? Die Gewissensfrage der Demokratieundated
247Die Wissenschaft und das Leben1918

Subseries IV: Reviews, 1918-1955

This subseries is primarily in German.
1.0 linear feet
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

A large part of the collection is newspaper and magazine articles with reviews of Franz Rosenzweig’s works. There are nearly 700 clippings or copies of articles, many of them on the translation of the Bible by Buber and Rosenzweig. The reviews were organized according to the work.

The correspondence concerning Franz Rosenzweig’s works, both to him and to his widow Edith Rosenzweig, is part of Series III: Correspondence.

BoxFolderTitleDate
31Das älteste Systemprogramm des deutschen Idealismus1917-1926
32Bauleute1924-1925
33Franz Rosenzweig's Briefe1935-1945
34Introduction to Hermann Cohens Juedische Schriften1924-1929
35Handwritten Copies of Reviews1924-1929
36Hegel und der Staat 1920-1929
37Jehuda Halevi1924-1929
38Kleinere Schriften 1937-1938
39Die Schrift - The Translation of the Bible by Martin Buber and Franz Rosenzweig - A-E1926-1931
310Die Schrift - The Translation of the Bible by Martin Buber and Franz Rosenzweig - F-I1926-1931
311Die Schrift - The Translation of the Bible by Martin Buber and Franz Rosenzweig - J1926-1931
312Die Schrift - The Translation of the Bible by Martin Buber and Franz Rosenzweig - K-N1926-1931
313Die Schrift - The Translation of the Bible by Martin Buber and Franz Rosenzweig - O-Z1926-1931
314Die Schrift - The Translation of the Bible by Martin Buber and Franz Rosenzweig - List of Reviews 1931
315Die Schrift und Luther1926-1928
316Der Stern der Erlösung1923-1937
317Der Stern der Erlösung - 3rd Edition1954-1955
318Zeit ist's1910, 1918
319Zweistromland1927-1929
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Series III: Correspondence, 1910-1969

This series is in German.
0.6 linear foot
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

Subseries 1: Family contains transcripts of letters of Franz Rosenzweig to his parents Adele and Georg Rosenzweig written during the First World War. These letters contain not only descriptions and observations of the regular days of a German soldier stationed at various European battlefields, but also some thoughts and reflections on his readings, and letters to his wife, Edith Rosenzweig.

Subseries 2: Friends, collaborators, and colleagues is the largest part of this series. This subseries includes Franz Rosenzweig’s correspondence with more than fifty various figures, among them Martin Buber, Leo Baeck, Friedrich Meinecke, Eugen Rosenstock, and also some of Franz Rosenzweig’s relatives, i.e. Rudolf Ehrenberg. Letters of Franz Rosenzweig’s are mostly typewritten copies or hand-written copies (Durchschriften). Because of his illness Franz Rosenzweig did not write most of his letters, but had to dictate them. Some were written by his wife Edith Rosenzweig, others are written by an unidentified hand. However, several of the earlier letters (i.e. to Friedrich Meinecke or to Eva Ehrenberg) are written by Franz Rosenzweig’s hand. Those letters addressed to his wife are filed in Subseries 1: Family.

Subseries 3: Letters related to Franz Rosenzweig’s writings contains letters that comment on publication of Franz Rosenzweig’s works and also on publication. Correspondence concerning Franz Rosenzweig's Briefe (1935), addressed to his widow Edith Rosenzweig.

Subseries 1: Family, 1914-1969

0.2 linear feet
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

Subseries 1: Family: contains transcripts of letters of Franz Rosenzweig to his parents Adele and Georg Rosenzweig written during the First World War. These letters contain not only descriptions and observations of the regular days of a German soldier stationed at various European battlefields, but since Franz Rosenzweig read extensively also some thoughts and reflections on his readings. While the letters seem to be transcribed in their entirety, the excerpts from 1914-1918 are basically identical with excerpts which later appeared in the first volume Briefe und Tagebücher 1900-1918 of Franz Rosenzweig’s collected works Franz Rosenzweig: Der Mensch und sein Werk. Gesammelte Schriften. Haag 1979: Martinus Nijhoff, 602 p.

BoxFolderTitleDate
41Adele Rosenzweig1918-1929
42Adele and Georg Rosenzweig 1914 Aug. 8 - 1916 Jun. 4
43Adele and Georg Rosenzweig1916 Jun. 5-1916 Oct. 19
44Adele and Georg Rosenzweig1916 Oct. 20- 1917 Feb. 11
45Adele and Georg Rosenzweig1917 Feb. 12-1917 May 10
46Adele and Georg Rosenzweig1917 May 13-Feb 1917 Jul. 28
47Adele and Georg Rosenzweig - Excerpts 1914-1918
48Edith Rosenzweig1920-1924, 1966-1969

Subseries 2: Friends, collaborators, and colleagues, 1910-1960

0.3 linear feet
Arrangement:

Alphabetical by name of the correspondent.

Scope and Content:

The largest part of this series is correspondence between Franz Rosenzweig and his friends and colleagues. Among them are Martin Buber, Leo Baeck, Friedrich Meinecke, Eugen Rosenstock, but also some of Franz Rosenzweig’s relatives, i.e. Rudolf Ehrenberg. Letters of Franz Rosenzweig’s are mostly typewritten copies or hand-written copies (Durchschriften). Because of his illness Franz Rosenzweig did not write most of his letters. Some were written by his wife Edith Rosenzweig, and some are written by an unidentified hand. However, several of the earlier letters (i.e. to Friedrich Meinecke or to Eva Ehrenberg) are written in Franz Rosenzweig’s hand.

BoxFolderTitleDate
49Baeck, Leo1923-1929
410Baumann, Henny1922
411Baumgarten, Walter1928
412Blau, Julius1924, 1928
413Bradt, Gustav; Frau1924
414Breuer, Isaac1924
415Buber, Martinundated, 1927
416Carlebach, Joseph1926, 1929
417Cohen, Martha1927, 1929
418Diemann, Max1924-1927
419Ehrenberg, Eva1921, 1924
420Ehrenberg, Julie1918
421Ehrenberg, Richard1918
422Ehrenberg, Rudolf1913-1929
423Ehrenberg, Victor1915-1929
424Fritzsche, Robert Arnold 1926-1928
425Glatzer, Nahum1926
426Guttmann, Julius1929
427Horowitz, Jacob (?)1924
428Huch, Ricarda1924
429Jacob, Beno1921-1922
430Jacob, Ernst1922
431Kahler, Siegfried1924
432Mainzer, Max1924
433Markowicz, Ernst1922
434Mayer, Eugen1923-1928
435Meinecke, Friedrich1910-1923
436Oppenheim, Gertrud1919-1920
437Picard, ?1925
438Raeburn, Walter1923
439Rosenstock, Eugen1916-1928
440Rothschild, Henry1929
441Schaeffer, Albrecht1929
442Schalit, Heinrich1929
443Scholem, Gerschom1921-1929
444Schwarzschild, Fritz1922
445Seligmann, Caesaro1925
446Simon, Ernst1924, 1927, 1960
447Sommer, Helene1925
448Stahl, Rudolf1923-1927
449Stern, ?1924
450Stoll, ?1927
451Strauss, Bruno1923
452Strauss, Eduard1919-1920, 1979
453Susman - von Bendemann, Margarete1919-1929
454Tag, Bernhard1927
455Tramer, Hans1940
456Trueb, Hans1928
457Weizsaecker, Viktor von1927
458Wittig, Joseph1928
459Wolfskehl, Karl1926, 1928
460Unidentified1926

Subseries 3: Related to Franz Rosenzweig’s writings, 1920-1935

0.1 linear feet
Arrangement:

Alphabetical by the title of the book.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains letters that react to publication of Franz Rosenzweig’s works. Mostly original letters, the correspondence concerning Buber’s and Rosenzweig’s translation of the Bible is mostly copies written to Martin Buber. The subseries also contains letters written to Edith Rosenzweig after publication of Briefe in 1935.

BoxFolderTitleDate
461Briefe1935
462Hegel und der Staat1920
463Die Schrift - A-K 1922-1930
464Die Schrift - L-Z1925-1930
465Die Schrift und Luther1926-1927
466Der Stern der Erlösung 1927
467Zweistromland1926
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Series IV: Family, 1832-1966

This series is in German and Judeo-German.
0.1 linear feet
Arrangement:

Alphabetical by the name of person.

Scope and Content:

This series contains material about the parents of Franz Rosenzweig, Georg Rosenzweig and Adele Rosenzweig neé Alsberg. Even though Georg Rosenzweig was a relatively successful local entrepreneur who managed to expand the family-owned drug store to the plant Lackfabrik Rosenzweig & Baumann and was publicly active and even became one of the members of the Municipal Council, there is little on his life besides obituaries and several photos. The life of Franz Rosenzweig’s mother is better documented, especially through her own memoirs, that were inspired by Franz Rosenzweig in early 1921.

Materials pertaining to the whole Rosenzweig-Ehrenberg family are also part of this series. The main part of this section is one hundred and sixty one letters that can provide a scholar with an interesting view of the early-19th century-family and the role of women in German society in the 19th century.

Franz Rosenzweig’s grandfather Louis Rosenzweig was a chemist, a disciple of Justus von Liebig, and a businessman. He married his cousin Amelie Ehrenberg who is the author of many letters in this series. Father of Amelie Ehrenberg, Samuel Meier Ehrenberg was a teacher and later a school inspector. Louis and Amelie Rosenzweig had two children, Traugott and Georg Rosenzweig.

The letters of Amelie Rosenzweig are addressed either to Adelheid Zuns, a friend of Amelie, 20 years her senior, or to Adelheid and Leopold Zunz. Louis Rosenzweig often made additions to Amelie Rosenzweig’ letters. Other additions to her letters are from her father S.M. Ehrenberg or from her brother Philipp Ehrenberg. Philipp Ehrenberg married Julia Fischel in August 1847, shortly before the marriage of Louis and Amelie Ehrenberg, and Amelie Rosenzweig’s letters are from the time prior to and directly after the marriage. Julie Fishel, who died in 1922, annotated some of the letters.

The memoirs of Samuel Meier Ehrenberg "Meine Lebensbeschreibung" (ME 788) and the biography of Amelie Rosenzweig that was compiled from her correspondence by Adele Rosenzweig under the title "Grossmutter Malchen. Vom Kind bis zur jungen Frau" (ME 789) were removed to the LBI Memoir Collection. Some of the photographs were moved into the LBI Photographic Collection.

1) Rosenzweig, Adele neé Alsberg

BoxFolderTitleDate
468List of Relativesundated
469Memoirs (Errinerungsbuch)1922
470Memoirs - Typed Copy1922
BoxFolderTitleDate
4171Recollections on Franz Rosenzweig's Childhood1922

2) Rosenzweig, Georg

BoxFolderTitleDate
472Photosundated
473Obituariesundated, 1918
474Obituariesundated, 1918

3) Rosenzweig-Ehrenberg Family

BoxFolderTitleDate
475Family Tree Rosenzweig-Ehrenbergundated, 1966
476Letters to Louis Resenzweig from the Prussian - Danish War1864
477Poems by S.M. Ehrenberg1837, 1848, 1852?
478Rosenzweig, Amelie to Adelheid and Leopold Zunz1832-1875
479Rosenzweig, Amalie and Louis Rosenzweig1843-1847
480Rosenzweig, Amelie to Julie Fischel-Ehrenberg1846-1858

4) Portraits

BoxFolderTitleDate
481Family Rosenzweigundated, 1843
482Family Rosenzweig, Ehrenberg, Alsbergundated
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Series V: Varia, 1914-1946?

This series is in German.
0.1 linear feet
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

Series V: Varia contains material that was not included into the original arrangement of that part of the Franz Rosenzweig Collection that was donated by Nahum Glatzer, or material that was added to the collection in the course of time and did not fit the layout of the arrangement. One of the items is a circular letter with no return address that suggests nominating Dr. Joseph Prager as a leader of the Freie Juedische Lehrhaus and Erich Fromm as one of his collaborators. It also contains a festschrift in honor of the seventieth birthday of Eduard Strauss, Aufsaetze und Anmerkungen. 1919-1945 with articles on Franz Rosenzweig and his works.

BoxFolderTitleDate
483Circular Letter1923
BoxFolderTitleDate
Art. Col.Cohen, Hermann - Plaquetteundated
BoxFolderTitleDate
484Cohen, Martha - Photo1930
485Kracauer, Siegfried: Ginster. Fragmente aus einem Roman1928
486Strauss, Eduard: Aufsaetze und Anmerkungen1946?
487Verwendung von Brom und Chlor für Stinkenbomben1914
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Series VI: Addenda, 1921-1999

This series is mostly in German.
0.1 linear feet
Arrangement:

Chronological by date of acquisition date.

Scope and Content:

Series VI: Addenda contains various material that arrived later and was not included into the already arranged collection. The latest addendum is the old inventories that were added to the collection in 2003, once it was consolidated. Addendum 1 contains several photos of Franz Rosenzweig, reminiscences of Eric Ahrens on the beginning of the Freie Juedische Lehrhaus written in 1971, and other commemorative articles. Addendum 2 contains among other materials copies of correspondence between Rudolf Stahl and Franz Rosenzweig and other colleagues, and catalogs of the Freie Juedische Lehrhaus. Addendum 3 holds a letter to Rudolf Hallo from Franz Rosenzweig. Addendum 4 contains letter from Franz Rosenzweig to Irene Darmstaedter from 1928 together with some 4 German Imperial banknotes from 1920 of 4 000 RM of nominal value. Addendum 5 includes eleven documents written by or related to Franz Rosenzweig found in books belonging to Edith Rosenzweig-Scheinmann (poems, drafts of manuscripts, newspaper, and clippings).

BoxFolderTitleDate
488Addendum 11921-1999
BoxFolderTitleDate
ROS 1 Addendum 1 - Death Mask 1929?
  View 1 
  View 2 
BoxFolderTitleDate
489Addendum 2 - Rudolf Stahl1921-1928
490Addendum 2 - Catalog of the Freie Juedische Lehrhaus1922-1936
491Addendum 31922
492Addendum 41928
493Addendum 5undated, 1926-1935, 1999
494Addendum 6undated
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