Guide to the Papers of Leo Baerwald (1883-1970)
1798-1971

AR 3677 / MF 699

Processed by Ilse Turnheim

Leo Baeck Institute

Center for Jewish History

15 West 16th Street

New York, N.Y. 10011

Phone: (212) 744-6400

Fax: (212) 988-1305

Email: http://www.lbi.org/ask

URL: http://www.lbi.org

© 2006 Leo Baeck Institute. All rights reserved.
Center for Jewish History, Publisher.
Electronic finding aid was encoded in EAD 2002 by Dianne Ritchey Oummia in February 2006. Description is in English.
October 23, 2013  Links to digital objects added in Container List.

Descriptive Summary

Creator: Baerwald, Leo, 1883-1970
Title: Leo Baerwald Collection
Dates:1798-1971
Dates:bulk 1922-1960
Abstract: This collection holds the papers of Leo Baerwald, rabbi of the Munich Jewish community from 1918-1940. Included are some of his religious writings, correspondence, and genealogical material. Other subjects of this collection are the Lazarus family, the Munich Jewish community, and Leo Baeck. Documents include manuscripts, letters, clippings, memorial albums, and family trees.
Languages: The collection is in German, English, and Hebrew.
Quantity: 0.5 linear foot
Identification: AR 3677 / MF 699
Repository: Leo Baeck Institute
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Biographical Note

Leo Baerwald was born in Saaz, Austria-Hungary (now Žatec, Czech Republic) on October 23, 1883. The son of Aron Baerwald, the rabbi of Saaz, and Fanny Lazarus, he was descended from a family of rabbis and well-known Jewish scholars including Moritz Lazarus and Heymann Steinthal. Baerwald studied at the Jüdisch-theologisches Seminar in Breslau (now Wroclaw, Poland). After serving in World War I as a military chaplain (Feldrabbiner), he became a rabbi for the Jewish community in Munich. He kept this position until his departure from Germany. From 1933 on Baerwald struggled against the Nazi regime. He was refused a travel permit to leave the country for health reasons. It was in 1940 that he was finally able to leave Germany for England, where he waited for a visa to the United States.

After arriving in the United States, Baerwald settled in New York City, where he became the rabbi of the Congregation Beth Hillel in Washington Heights. This congregation was made up of Jewish refugees from Munich and Nuremberg. He retired from this position in 1955. After his retirement he continued to support the congregation as well as becoming involved in the work of the Leo Baeck Institute and the American Federation of Jews from Central Europe. Leo Baerwald died in New York in 1970 at the age of 86.

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Scope and Content Note

This collection documents the professional life, family, and interests of Leo Baerwald. Some topics found here include Leo Baerwald, the Lazarus family, Leo Baeck, and the Munich Jewish Community.

Items pertaining to Leo Baerwald will be found in four series of the collection. Series I contains most of the material pertaining to him. Here users will find some of his personal documents, writings, letters sent to him, and genealogical documents, including family trees. Series III contains correspondence, much of it handwritten, from rabbi Leo Baeck to Leo Baerwald; many of these are greetings. Series IV holds many clippings on the Munich Jewish community and its main synagogue, and includes an article by Baerwald, published in 1942, on the destruction of the synagogue. Finally, Series VI contains some biographical articles on Baerwald as well as a small amount of correspondence and notes of his.

The Lazarus family, to whom Leo Baerwald was related through his mother, Fanny Lazarus, is also documented in several places in this collection. Series II, which focuses on the Lazarus family, contains the papers of several family members: Leiser Lazarus, rabbi of Prenzlau and director of the Jewish theological seminary in Breslau; Moritz Lazarus, the philosopher; and Arnold Lazarus, rabbi in Frankfurt am Main. Among the papers on these individuals are several memorial albums, including a collection of sayings of Moritz Lazarus, and a biography of Arnold Lazarus written by Leo Baerwald. The family trees and other genealogical documents found in Series I and Series VI provide some genealogical information on the Lazarus family.

Material on Leo Baeck resides in Series III. These documents include a number of newspaper and periodical clippings on the rabbi; many of these give overviews of his life and were written in honor of significant dates or in memorial of him. As mentioned above, this series also features some correspondence written by Baeck to Baerwald.

Many newspaper articles on the Munich Jewish community will be found in Series IV: Jewish Communities. These articles describe the fiftieth anniversary of the main synagogue of Munich, its destruction by the National Socialists in June 1938, and the restoration and dedication of the new synagogue in 1947.

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Arrangement

This collection has six series:

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Access and Use

Access Restrictions

Open to researchers.

Access Information

Collection is digitized. Follow the links in the Container List to access the digitized materials.

Collection is microfilmed (MF 699).

Use Restrictions

There may be some restrictions on the use of the collection. For more information, contact:
Leo Baeck Institute, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY 10011
email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org

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Access Points

Click on a subject to search that term in the Center's catalog. Return to the Top of Page

Related Material

The LBI Archives holds several collections on Lazarus family members.

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Separated Material

The memorial album of sayings of Moritz Lazarus (Sprüche des Lazarus) is located separately from the rest of the collection. Photographs have been removed from the collection and placed in LBI's photograph collection.

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Custodial History

The papers of the collection previosly belonged to Leo Baerwald until the collection was donated in 1970.

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Microfilm

This collection is on one reel of microfilm.

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Preferred Citation

Published citations should take the following form:

Identification of item, date (if known); Leo Baerwald Collection; AR 3677; box number; folder number; Leo Baeck Institute.

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Processing Information

When the EAD finding aid was being prepared in February 2006, the collection was rehoused in acid-free folders. In Series VI, similar materials were grouped together; previously most items were located in their own folder. Series V was formerly titled "Varia."

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Other Finding Aid

An item-level paper finding aid is available for the collection.

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Container List

The following section contains a detailed listing of the materials in the collection.

Follow the links to access the digitized materials.

 

Series I: Leo Baerwald, 1798-1970

This series is in German, with some English.
0.1 linear foot.
Arrangement:

Topical.

Scope and Content:

This series holds papers concerning Leo Baerwald. Included here are documents providing biographical information on him, copies of some of his writings, correspondence sent to him, and material on Baerwald's family history.

Among the personal documents are certificates proving Baerwald passed the test for the rabbinate and describing an honor given him in Bavaria in 1964. An article with biographical information will also be found here. Most of Baerwald's writings discuss religious themes, especially centered on the Bible. There is also a biographical article on Ludwig Feuchtwanger. Among the small amount of correspondence found here are two postcards from Julius Bab, as well as a letter from Michael von Faulhaber, Archbishop of Munich, thanking Baerwald for his birthday greetings. The genealogical material in this series consists of several family trees, correspondence with Baerwald relatives, and a copy of a 1798 document of Baerwald's great-grandfather request for permission from the king to marry the daughter of a Schutzjude.

BoxFolderTitleDate
11Personal1911-1970
12Writings1933-1934
13Writings – Newspaper Clippings1925-1932
14Correspondence1940-1964
15Genealogical Material1798-1963
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Series II: Lazarus Family Members, 1824-1903

This series is in German, with some English.
0.1 linear foot.
Arrangement:

By family member.

Scope and Content:

Series II is comprised of the personal documents of several Lazarus family members. Among the items are certificates and albums, including an anniversary album for Leiser Lazarus after twenty-five years as a rabbi in Prenzlau and memorial albums created for the sixtieth and seventieth birthdays of Moritz Lazarus. This series also contains a biography of Arnold Lazarus, written by Leo Baerwald.

The seventieth birthday album of philosopher Moritz Lazarus is one of the most notable items in this collection. It includes a handwritten collection of 851 sayings of Lazarus, created and illustrated by his wife Nahida and organized by subject. The aphorisms were taken from writings of Moritz Lazarus and cover topics including work and vocations; education; nature and spirit; the single and the whole; imperfections; honor and ambition; games and humor; friendship; truth; humanity; and morals and religion.

BoxFolderTitleDate
16Leiser Lazarus1824-1878
17Moritz Lazarusundated, 1884-1903
BoxFolderTitleDate
R4Moritz Lazarus - Memorial Album "Sprüche des Lazarus"1894
BoxFolderTitleDate
18Arnold Lazarusundated
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Series III: Leo Baeck, 1948-1959

This series is in German, with some English.
0.1 linear foot.
Arrangement:

Topical.

Scope and Content:

Series III contains items pertaining to rabbi Leo Baeck. Included are published articles about him, examples of Germany's Leo Baeck commemmorative stamp and letters sent by Leo Baeck to Leo Baerwald.

Published articles found here include those with biographical information. Many of the articles were written on the occasion of Baeck's birthdays or after his death. Other articles include a review of a book of his or concern institutions named after him, including the Leo Baeck Institute and the Leo Baeck School in Haifa, Israel. Correspondence found here is comprised mainly of handwritten and original letters. Much of the correspondence has personal greetings and mentions visits between the two individuals or their family members. Two letters discuss Jewish communities in Germany.

BoxFolderTitleDate
19Published Articles1948-1962
110Published Articles – Newspaper Clippings1948-1959
111Leo Baeck Commemorative Stampundated
112Correspondence1950-1955
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Series IV: Jewish Communities,  1927-1960

This series is in German, with some English.
2 folders.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

This series is composed of newspaper clippings on various German Jewish communities. The most well-represented community is that of Munich. Many of the articles mention the fiftieth anniversary celebration of the main synagogue in Munich in 1937, its destruction, and the restoration of the synagogue after World War II. Other topics found here include the Jewish tradition in Hamburg, Munich Jewry and their community, Jewish education in Munich, and the synagogue in Bechhofen.

BoxFolderTitleDate
113B-Hundated, 1960
  
  • Bechhofen
  • Hamburg
 
114M-Zundated, 1927-1955
  
  • Munich
  • Nuremberg
  • Prague
  • Unknown
 
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Series V: Collected Items, 1801-1967

This series is in German, with some English.
0.1 linear foot.
Arrangement:

Topical.

Scope and Content:

This series holds documents that were assembled for this collection, possibly by Leo Baerwald or his family members. Among the papers here are publications, manuscripts, notes, and personal documents.

Personal documents located here consist of a passport for Samual Wolff Meyer and a Hebrew prayer written during a cholera outbreak. A manuscript included here is a lengthy handwritten work by J. Cohen on the Christian church as seen from the Jewish standpoint. Notes include typed excerpts from works by Maxim Gorki and of correspondence between Eduard Lasker and Hermann Baerwald. Finally, this series also holds published articles on a variety of topics. Among those found here are an article on Martin Buber's view of Judaism by Gershom Scholem, publications of the Hilfsverein der Deutschen Juden and the World Union for Progressive Judaism describing their work, and circulars of the Gesellschaft für christlich-jüdische Zusammenarbeit in Hamburg. One of these circulars contains a portrayal of Israel in the 1950s.

BoxFolderTitleDate
115Collected Items1953
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Series VI: Addenda,  1922-1971

This series is in German, with some English.
0.1 linear foot.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

Series VI: Addenda consists of documents that were added at a later date to this collection. This small series holds biographical material, correspondence, genealogical information, and some notes.

The biographical documents found here are comprised of two clippings on Leo Baerwald as well as a negative of a photograph of him and an invitation by his congregation to a concert in Baerwald's memory. Correspondence includes a letter from an antique bookseller and a handwritten letter concerning the transport of Munich residents to Riga. Genealogical documents in this series are made up of several family trees and a photocopy of a photograph of family members. Finally, the notes here are a transcription of stenographic notes by Baerwald on genealogy and its use in recalling the history of the Jewish people.

BoxFolderTitleDate
116Biographical Material1955-1971
117Correspondence1922-1949
118Genealogyundated
119Notes1948
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