Guide to the Papers of William G. Niederland Collection (1904-1993), 1909-1989

AR 7165 / MF 959

Processed by Frauke Steffens

Leo Baeck Institute

Center for Jewish History

15 West 16th Street

New York, N.Y. 10011

Phone: (212) 744-6400

Fax: (212) 988-1305

Email: http://www.lbi.org/ask

URL: http://www.lbi.org

© 2006  Leo Baeck Institute
Finding aid was encoded by Lea Osborne on March 1, 2006. Access restrictions exist for Series V: Psychiatric Cases, subseries 1 and 2. Description is in English.
2010-04-28  encoding of linking to digital objects from finding aid was changed from <extref> to <dao> through dao_conv.xsl. January 2009: Information on box 7 added. March 2009: Microfilm inventory added. March 2010: Updated Container List; added Series IX.

Descriptive Summary

Creator: Niederland, William G., 1904-1993
Title: William G. Niederland Collection
Dates: 1903-1989
Abstract: Dr. William G. Niederland (1904-1993) was a renowned psychiatrist who immigrated to the United States in 1940 via Italy and the Philippines. While he was a psychiatric expert for German indemnification trials of survivors of the Holocaust, Niederland became an advocate of the survivors' claims and an empathetic researcher of their psychic suffering. He engaged in scientific research on psychic sequelae in Holocaust survivors for more than four decades. Niederland is believed to have discovered the "Survivor Syndrome," as a psychiatric disease and condition. The William G. Niederland Collection contains manuscripts, lectures and published writings by Niederland (and others) as well as 165 court case files consisting of psychiatric opinions, correspondence and court decisions referring to individual indemnification cases. Also included are correspondence with his colleagues and material related to his various research projects.
Languages: The collection is in English, German and Italian.
Quantity: Six linear feet
Identification: AR 7165
Repository: Leo Baeck Institute
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Biographical Note

William G. Niederland was born on August 29, 1904 in Schippenbeil, East Prussia. His father was an orthodox cantor who moved with his family to Würzburg in order to become a rabbi there. In 1929, Niederland received his medical degree from the University of Würzburg and subsequently worked as a physician in Berlin, Düsseldorf and Geilingen. Niederland immigrated to Italy in 1934. There he took the medical exam for a second time and established a psychiatric practice in Milan. However, he was forced to flee to England five years later to escape the increasingly prevalent growth of fascism. The following year, Niederland entered the United States as an immigrant, although he did not become a citizen until 1954.

After having passed his third medical exam in 1941, Niederland founded a private practice in New York with another immigrant, Paul Kahn. In addition, he traveled throughout the United States giving lectures on the subject of fascism in Germany and other European countries. From 1945 to 1947, Niederland taught at the University of Tampa in Florida. Upon leaving this post, he traveled to Europe for the first time since World War II and visited Zürich, Düsseldorf, and his childhood home, Würzburg.

Apart from working as a psychiatrist in both private practice and several hospitals in New York and New Jersey, Niederland was also a renowned scholar, professor, and published author. On his return to New York City, Niederland commenced studying at the New York Psychoanalytic Institute, where he underwent formal psychoanalytic training between 1948 and 1953. He published his first book, Man Made Plague: A Primer on Neurosis in 1948. At the end of his training, Niederland taught at the Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn from 1952 until 1977 when he was named Professor Emeritus. Furthermore, he maintained a private practice in New York for twenty years. In terms of professional activities, Niederland was a coeditor of Psychoanalytic Quarterly from 1958 to 1980. In 1971, he became president of the Psychoanalytic Association of New York, a position he held until 1973.

One of Niederland's major research interests for decades was the case of Daniel Paul Schreber, whose diaries had been analyzed by Freud in 1911. Niederland published numerous articles on the case, focusing on Schreber's childhood and his relationship with his father, these aspects having been neglected by previous researchers (in Niederland's opinion). His first work on Schreber, "Three Notes on the Schreber Case," was published in 1951; the book, The Schreber Case: Psychoanalytic Profile of a Paranoid Personality, came out in 1974.

In 1961, Niederland and his family traveled to Greece where he conducted extensive research on Heinrich Schliemann, which resulted in several publications, such as "Eros and Thanatos in the Life of Heinrich Schliemann: Psychoanalytic Profile of a Creative Mind" (1967). Creativity and the creative process became one of Niederland's dominant areas of research. One of his theses concerning this topic was that having confronted tragic or disturbing events during their childhood, many creative people achieved a higher emotional responsiveness to internal as well as external stimuli.

Karl Menninger, the well-known American psychiatrist, characterized Niederland as having a "gift for uncovering rare and exciting mysteries, examining them with psychoanalytic wisdom and presenting them to us as the most delightful reading material." (Wenda Focke. William G. Niederland: Psychiater der Verfolgten: Seine Zeit, Sein Leben, Sein Werk. Würzburg: Könighausen and Neumann, 1992. p. 267). Wenda Focke, Niederland's former assistant, posited that the variety and vividness of his research activities allowed him to maintain his professional distance and cope with what became his main achievement in the field of psychiatry: the study of the psychic suffering of Holocaust survivors.

From 1953 onward, Niederland was a consultant to German courts ruling on indemnification claims by Holocaust survivors. Appointed by the German Consulate General, Niederland examined survivors claiming indemnification from German federal and state governments. The main question a psychiatric consultant had to answer was: to what extent a person (e.g. a concentration camp survivor, a former slave laborer, or someone who had lost his or her entire family in the Holocaust) was damaged in his or her capability to work for a living. Only if the court regarded the total extent of physical and psychic damage as being twenty-five percent or higher, claimants would be assigned indemnification. Moreover, the prevalent theory among German psychiatric consultants at the time was that the survivors' psychiatric diseases and mental suffering were results of the patients' dispositions, rather than the results of Nazi persecution.

Together with a handful of other psychiatrists, Niederland fought against this interpretation. He vehemently criticized clinical psychiatry for not regarding human beings as inseparable entities of body and soul, but merely as a conglomeration of organs and organic systems. Niederland, who was constantly confronted with Holocaust survivors, recognized that his patients' suffering was severe, persistent and incurable. He submitted very detailed and empathetic psychiatric reports that not only illustrated the impact of Nazi persecution on peoples' mental constitution, but were a testament to the life-enduring suffering of numerous Holocaust survivors. Niederland researched extensively on the psychic sequelae of the Holocaust in both child and adult survivors of the camps. In 1961, he published "The Problems of the Survivor-Part I." Two years later, the "Wayne State University Workshop on the Late Sequelae of Massive Psychic Trauma" took place, raising scholarly attention to the psychic impacts of Nazi persecution and becoming an important venue for dialogue and discussion for the next several years.

Eventually, Niederland established an international research network with colleagues Robert J. Lifton, Ulrich Venzlaff and Henry Krystal. Niederland coined the term, "The Survivor Syndrome," in his 1964 publication of the same name. This now familiar medical phrase represents the traumatic aftermath of the Holocaust on millions of people within and outside the United States, based on the evaluation of about 800 cases he and others had examined. Numerous articles and lectures in the United States and Europe followed over the next decade. In 1968, the book Massive Psychic Trauma (edited by Henry Krystal) was published and in 1971 Krystal and Niederland together published, Psychic Traumatization: Aftereffects in Individuals and Communities. One of Niederland's most important works was Folgen der Verfolgung: Das Überlebenden-Syndrom, Seelenmord. Some of the psychiatric reports contained within this volume were being published for the first time. The term "Seelenmord" (Soul Murder) was meant to characterize the survivors' lifelong suffering and alienation from the "normal world." The controversies with other German psychiatric consultants, who in many cases disconnected the survivors' mental disease from their experiences and tried to reduce the chargeable impacts merely on physical damage, helped to sharpen Niederland's scientific concept. By the time the number of claims had decreased in the 1970s and 1980s, he had not only helped many survivors personally, but had contributed largely to the broader perspective concerning the Holocaust's impact on the victims and their descendents on both sides of the Atlantic.

Until he died in 1993, Niederland worked on all of his various research projects simultaneously. His last work on Schreber was published in 1989 in addition to a collection of essays entitled "Trauma und Kreativität" (Trauma and Creativity). These late dates illustrate the commitment and passion that Niederland exhibited for his psychiatric topics, a commitment that spanned both time and geographic space.

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Scope and Contents

The collection is arranged in eight series

Series I contains examples of Niederland's literary output, including publications, manuscripts and lectures on various subjects, predominantly Holocaust survivors. The series reflects his scientific work as well as his endeavors to raise scholarly and public awareness of this subject by giving lectures in the United States, Germany and Switzerland.

Series II consists of publications, manuscripts and lectures of other authors in addition to a few publications by the German government on indemnification laws. Records included here illustrate the scientific debate on the psychic sequelae of the Holocaust. Publications on other topics are also included.

Documents regarding scientific conferences, such as announcements, schedules and meeting minutes are contained in Series III. These conferences focus primarily on Holocaust survivors and date from 1946 to 1988.

Series IV is composed of correspondence between Niederland and his colleagues as well as private individuals. This series holds a rather small portion of Niederland's correspondence, while the bulk may be found in the records of the Niederland Collection held at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.

Psychiatric Cases, Series V, comprises the largest section of the collection. The series consists of 165 reports on Holocaust survivors claiming indemnification before German courts and several other reports not related to such cases. Due to privacy issues, portions of this series are restricted to researchers.

Series VI contains documents relating to the Daniel Paul Schreber case and the Winterstein case. Again, this is a small representative sample of Niederland's records on this topic. The bulk of the documents are held at the Library of Congress.

Printed Material may be found in Series VII and includes newspaper articles concerning Holocaust survivors, Niederland's scientific research and published works and other various subjects that were of interest to him.

Series VIII consists of miscellaneous records such as handwritten notes, fragments of unidentified articles and several requests for autographs.

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Arrangement

The collection is arranged in eight series.

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Access and Use

Access Restrictions

Access to Series V: Psychiatric Cases: Subseries 1 and 2 (box/folders 3/32-6/16) is restricted. Users may request a xerox copy of the medical report with names expunged, however, the copy cannot be released from the archives and must be returned before the user leaves the reading room.

Box 7 holds sample case files with names expunged that are open to the public.

For more information, please contact: Leo Baeck Institute, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY 10011 lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org

Use Restrictions

There are restrictions on the use of the collection. For more information, contact:
Leo Baeck Institute, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY, 10011
email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org

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Related Material

The Library of Congress holds a large collection of Niederland's private files, writings and correspondence. These records, which are part of the Sigmund Freud Collection, contain the larger portion of Niederland's correspondence and his paper on research projects not relating to Holocaust survivors and their psyche.

There is a smaller collection of files belonging to William G. Niederland in the archives of the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research.

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Microfilm

The collection is on 19 reels of microfilm (MF 959). Access is restricted on reels 9-18.

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Preferred Citation

Published citations should take the following form:

Identification of item, date (if known); William G. Niederland Collection; AR 7165; box number; folder number; Leo Baeck Institute.

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Container List

 

Series I: Writings by William G. Niederland, 1933-1983

This series is in English, German and Italian.
Seven folders
Arrangement:

The series is arranged by text genre. Subseries are arranged alphabetically by the title of the work.

Scope and Content:

This series contains three subseries. Included are publications, manuscripts and lectures by William Niederland.

Subseries 1: Publications, 1933-1981

This subseries is in English and German.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 1 consists of ten publications by Niederland and reflects the variety of his research. Subjects represented here include creativity and traumatization, Heinrich Schliemann and the psychic sequelae of the Holocaust. The most recent article, "The Survivor Syndrome: Further Observations and Dimensions," was published in 1981. This essay reflects Niederland's work of the previous decades and provides an outlook on dealing with the survivor syndrome almost forty years after 1945, stating that the syndrome is both irreversible and has the ability to impact survivors' children, suggesting further research.

Box Folder Title Date
1 1 Publications undated, 1933-1981

Subseries 2: Manuscripts, 1964-1970

This subseries is in English.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 2 contains seventeen manuscripts by Niederland. Included is the complete manuscript of his first book, Man Made Plague: A Primer on Neurosis. Also included are manuscripts on the survivor syndrome as well as outlines on several other subjects such as trauma research. Other manuscripts reflect Niederland's explorations of human creativity, a subject he felt was important during the last years of his professional work.

Box Folder Title Date
1 2 A through L undated and 1968
1 3 M 1949
1 4 N through O undated
1 5 P through Z undated, 1964-1970

Subseries 3: Lectures, 1962-1982

This subseries is in English and German.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 3 consists of eighteen lectures Niederland delivered to scientific and public audiences in the United States and Germany. Most of his lectures were concerned with Holocaust victims and their families, except for two undated lectures on creativity and one lecture on symbolism, given in 1983. In his scientific lectures, Niederland contributed to the controversial debates on the aftermath of the Holocaust and developed a concept for analyzing the psychic sequelae of Nazi persecution. In his public lectures, he aimed at raising peoples' awareness to the suffering of Holocaust survivors as well as victims of other tragedies.

Box Folder Title Date
1 6 A through L undated, 1966-1982
1 7 M through Z undated, 1962-1983
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Series II: Writings by Other Authors, 1956-1989

This series is in English and German.
Seventeen folders
Arrangement:

The series is arranged by text genre. Subseries are arranged alphabetically by the title of the work.

Scope and Content:

Series II consists of five subseries. Included are publications and manuscripts by various authors on the subject of Holocaust survivors. There is a also a compilation of brochures and books (partly copies) as well as a few official publications from the German government relating to indemnification laws. The series shows how respected Niederland was by other scholars, since many of them sent him their manuscripts to ask for his opinion and advice.

Subseries 1: Holocaust Survivors, 1959-1986

This subseries is in English and German.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 1 consists of twenty-nine works on Holocaust survivors by authors other than William Niederland. The oldest is an article by Ulrich Venzlaff who, in 1959, wrote on the psychic impacts of Nazi persecution in a German juristic periodical. Like Niederland, Venzlaff was a psychiatric expert in German indemnification cases and was opposed to the then-dominant interpretations of mental illness among Nazi victims. Before finally meeting for the first time in 1965, Niederland and Venzlaff had already been corresponding for about two years. Later, they became friends.

The subseries outlines some major aspects of psychiatric research on Holocaust survivors, such as the potential psychic impact on their children or the question: to what extent can schizophrenia be caused by exposure to extreme traumatization. Also included in this subseries is a manuscript of a television report on late psychic sequelae of the Holocaust, broadcast in Germany in 1965.

Box Folder Title Date
1 8 A through G undated, 1977-1982
1 9 G through H undated, 1965-1986
1 10 I through S undated, 1961-1983
1 11 T through Z 1959-1972

Subseries 2: General and Other Subjects, 1912-1988

This subseries is in English and German.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 2 consists of fifty-eight works by other authors, dealing with a broad variety of scientific subjects. Many of them are related to William Niederland's major fields of research. For example, there are several studies on the creative process, trauma research and other psychiatric subjects. In particular, Niederland was interested in works on the psychic sequelae of violence and genocide.

The works in this subseries reflect the amplitude of Niederland's research interests. Their subjects range from "Goethe: Sibling Rivalry and Faust" by Charles Kligerman to "The French Lieutenant's Woman: The Unconcious Significance of a Novel to its Author," by Gilbert Rose.

Box Folder Title Date
1 12 A through J undated, 1954-1984
1 13 K through L undated, 1961-1979
1 14 M through Sch undated, 1960-1988
1 15 Se through Sz undated, 1966-1981
1 16 T through Z undated, 1912-1986

Subseries 3: Unidentified Authors, 1987

This subseries is in English and German.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 3 consists of six works whose authors could not be identified. Included is an interview with William Niederland as well as research outlines on the persecution of Sinti and Roma (gypsies) in Nazi Germany.

Box Folder Title Date
2 1 Unidentified Authors undated and 1987

Subseries 4: Brochures and Books, 1920-1989

This subseries is in English and German.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 4 consists of fifteen brochures and copies of books. Included are two issues of the Bulletin of the Philadelphia Association for Psychoanalysis as well as two issues of The Sciences. The brochures present information about various organizations and exhibitions.

Box Folder Title Date
2 2 A through E 1971-1972
2 3 F 1964
2 4 G through I undated and 1988
2 5 J through Me 1968 and 1981
2 6 Mi through P 1960 and 1980-1987
2 7 Q through Z undated, 1918-1945, 1968 and 1989

Subseries 5: Government Publications on German Restitution, 1956-1967

This subseries is in German.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 5 consists of three publications from the German Federal Government on indemnification law. Included are two handbooks for medical consultants to German courts referring to issues such as eligibility criteria for indemnification payments and guidelines for examining claimants.

Box Folder Title Date
2 8 Handbook for Medical Consultants 1967
2 9 Handbook and Legal Records 1956-1967
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Series III: Conferences, Lectures and Workshops, 1946-1988

This series is in English and German.
Five folders
Arrangement:

This series is arranged topically.

Scope and Content:

This series consists of two subseries. Subseries 1 includes announcements and schedules of lectures and conferences, dating from 1946 to 1988. In Subseries 2, minutes of conferences and lectures have been collected.

Subseries 1: Announcements and Schedules, 1946-1988

This subseries is in English and German.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 1 contains various announcements and schedules from academic conferences and lectures. These date from 1946 to 1988. Most of the announced lectures were given by Niederland himself in Germany and the United States.

Box Folder Title Date
2 10 Printed Material 1946-1988

Subseries 2: Meeting Minutes and Reports, 1960-1986

This subseries is in English and German.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 2, consisting of eighteen items, contains meeting minutes and reports. Niederland collected lectures of other authors on a variety of subjects, though largely on mental diseases in Holocaust survivors and related issues. Included in this subseries are minutes of a discussion on "Children and Social Catastrophe" at the 1968 meeting of the American Psychoanalytic Association as well as the proceedings of the "Wayne State University Workshops on the Late Sequelae of Massive Psychic Traumatization." There is also a collection of six unpublished and undated lectures of Joseph Weiss, which he gave to Niederland, and the complete record of a conference on Nazi doctors in Bad Boll, Germany in 1982. The lectures reflect parts of the scientific discussion on the aftermath of the Holocaust taking place between 1960 and 1990.

Box Folder Title Date
2 11 A through L 1964-1983
2 12 M 1982
2 13 N through V 1960-1979
2 14 W through Z undated, 1961-1984
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Series IV: Correspondence, 1946-1989

This series is in English and German.
Thirty-one folders
Arrangement:

Alphabetically by name of individual or institution.

Scope and Content:

This series consists of three subseries. Subseries 1 contains Niederland's correspondence with colleagues and private individuals in the United States, Germany and Switzerland. Subseries 2 holds his correspondence with institutions and organizations, while subseries 3 includes shorter correspondence.

Subseries 1: Individuals, 1962-1987

This subseries is in English and German.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 1 consists of William Niederland's correspondence with seventeen colleagues and four private individuals, as well as fragments of correspondence between Kurt May and Fred Grubel. The correspondence partially reflects Niederland's international research contacts. However, one must take into account that the bulk of the correspondence with his colleagues may be found in the William G. Niederland Papers at the Library of Congress.

A) Scholars and Physicians

Box Folder Title Date
3 1 Beck, Dieter 1974
3 2 Boesky, Dale (1979-1980); Freud, Anna and Sigmund (1929-1931) 1929-1980
3 3 Brenner, Charles 1985
3 4 Dreher, Ursula 1987
3 5 Ehebald, Ulrich 1973-1975
3 6 Eissler, Kurt 1965
3 7 Fountain, Gerard 1980
3 8 Gertz, Kerri 1984-1987
3 9 Glauber, Peter 1962
3 10 Gringauz (Greengous), Samuel 1973-1974
3 11 Kempner, Robert 1974
3 12 Labisch, Alfons 1980
3 13 Liebfried, Stephan 1982
3 14 Peskin, Harvey 1983
3 15 Rosenman, Stanley 1984
3 16 Rothe, Wolfgang 1980
3 17 Shatan, Chaim F. 1975-1978

B) Private Individuals

Box Folder Title Date
3 18 Gold, Ruth 1981-1982
3 19 Hermann, Vivienne 1980
3 20 Juelich, Christiane 1975
3 21 Merker, Heinz 1969-1977

C) Correspondence of Other Individuals

Box Folder Title Date
3 22 Grubel, Fred to May, Kurt 1980

Subseries 2: Organizations and Institutions, 1946-1989

This subseries is in English and German.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 2 consists of correspondence with seven institutions, among them the German Consulate General, which appointed Niederland as a psychiatric expert for German indemnification trials.

Box Folder Title Date
3 23 German Consulate General 1965-1971
3 24 Maximilian-Kolbe-Werk Freiburg 1979-1981
3 25 Pax Christi, Frankfurt, Germany 1980-1981
3 26 Süddeutscher Rundfunk 1980
3 27 United States War Department 1947
3 28 University of Tampa, Florida 1946

Subseries 3: General, 1946-1984

This subseries is in English and German.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 3 contains brief correspondence with forty-three colleagues, private individuals and institutions.

Box Folder Title Date
3 29 A through I undated, 1953-1981
3 30 J through P 1948-1983
3 31 Q through Z undated, 1946-1984
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Series V: Psychiatric Cases, 1946-1984

This series is in English and German.
1.75 linear feet
Arrangement:

This series is arranged alphabetically by the patient's last name.

Scope and Content:

This series represents Niederland's work as a psychiatrist and consists of three subseries. Subseries 1 contains 161 patient files concerning indemnification claims by Holocaust survivors. Subseries 2 includes five patient files of psychiatric reports not related to indemnification trials, while subseries 3 consists of two medical files.

Restrictions:

Access to Series V: Psychiatric Cases: Subseries 1 and 2 is restricted. Users may request a xerox copy of the medical report with names expunged, however, the copy cannot be released from the archives and must be returned before the user leaves the reading room.

Please contact: Leo Baeck Institute, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY 10011 lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org

Subseries 1: Indemnification Cases (Psychiatric Opinions), 1946-1984

This subseries is in English and German.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 1 contains 161 case files consisting of psychiatric opinions for indemnification cases, most of which were written by Niederland. Many of the files include correspondence with patients (and in some cases, their lawyers) and court decisions. In general, the contents consisted of his personal impression of the individual patient, an outline of the patient's personal history and a final diagnosis.

Box 7, which is open to the public, contains sample case files where the names of individuals have been expunged.

Restrictions:

Access to Series V: Psychiatric Cases: Subseries 1 and 2 is restricted. Users may request a xerox copy of the medical report with names expunged, however, the copy cannot be released from the archives and must be returned before the user leaves the reading room.

Please contact: Leo Baeck Institute, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY 10011 lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org

Box Folder Title Date
3 32 Anonymous Male 1970
3 33 Anonymous Male 1970
3 34 A., M. 1966-1968
3 35 A., G. 1962-1963
3 36 B., H. and F. 1958-1964
3 37 B., E. 1967
3 38 B., T. 1965-1967
3 39 B., M. 1966
3 40 B., J. 1965
3 41 B., R. 1963
3 42 B., E. 1967
3 43 B., H. 1965-1966
3 44 B., B. 1964-1965
3 45 B., P. 1968
3 46 B., R. 1967-1969
3 47 B., H. 1965-1966
3 48 B., K. 1965
3 49 B., M. 1964
3 50 B., J. 1957-1981
3 51 B., E. 1964-1965
3 52 C., Ch. 1967
3 53 C., C. 1957-1962
3 54 C., M. 1962
3 55 E., J. J. 1969-1970
3 56 E., R. 1966
3 57 E., B. 1962
3 58 E., M. 1963-1964
3 59 E., E. 1964-1965
3 60 F., A. 1965
3 61 F., J. 1963
3 62 F., H. 1966
3 63 F., I. 1964
3 64 F., M. 1964
3 65 F., W. E. 1968
3 66 F., B. 1963
3 67 F., A. 1968-1969
3 68 F., P. 1966
3 69 G., D. 1970-1971
3 70 G., R. 1958-1962
3 71 G., A. 1970
3 72 G., E. 1968
3 73 G., M. 1978-1984
3 74 G., E. 1972-1973
Box Folder Title Date
4 1 H., A. 1964-1965
4 2 H., C. 1964-1965
4 3 H., I. 1965
4 4 H., P. 1975
4 5 H., K. 1965
4 6 H., E. 1973-1974
4 7 H., R. 1967
4 8 H., S. 1970
4 9 H., M. 1961-1966
4 10 H., P. 1961-1973
4 11 H., E. 1960-1966
4 12 H., M. 1966
4 13 J., E. 1963
4 14 J., W. 1962
4 15 J., T. 1967-1968
4 16 J., N. 1962
4 17 J., L. 1964
4 18 K., A. 1956-1966
4 19 K., C. 1966-1967
4 20 K., S. 1962
4 21 K., St. 1980
4 22 K., N. 1970
4 23 K., Z. 1964
4 24 K., D. 1962-1965
4 25 K., Di. 1963-1965
4 26 K., A. 1974-1977
4 27 K., H.-D. 1966
4 28 K., E. 1964-1965
4 29 L., F. 1962
4 30 L., D. 1979
4 31 L., M. 1964-1968
4 32 L., H. 1964-1965
4 33 L., R. 1964
4 34 L., A. 1965-1966
4 35 L., N. 1964
4 36 L., M. 1965
4 37 L., I. 1961-1962
4 38 L., E. 1965
4 39 L., M. 1973-1974
4 40 L., E. 1964
4 41 L., R. 1957-1965
4 42 M., L. 1964-1967
4 43 M., D. 1973
4 44 M., E. 1963-1966
4 45 M., S. 1965
4 46 M., E. 1963-1979
4 47 N., A. 1964
4 48 N., W. 1964-1965
4 49 N., T. 1974
4 50 N., E. 1965-1966
4 51 N., S. 1963
4 52 O., M. 1968
4 53 O., L. 1964-1968
4 54 O., R. 1965
4 55 P., H. 1966-1967
4 56 P., J. 1970-1981
Box Folder Title Date
5 1 P., G. 1962
5 2 P., S. 1968
5 3 P., H. 1968-1971
5 4 P., J. 1976-1979
5 5 Q., L. 1964
5 6 R., G. 1964
5 7 R., H. W. 1967-1968
5 8 R., P. 1979-1982
5 9 R., F. 1962
5 10 R., D. 1964
5 11 R., A. 1962-1967
5 12 R., E. 1966
5 13 R., W. 1964-1965
5 14 R., I. 1964
5 15 R., F. 1961-1962
5 16 R., T. 1966
5 17 R., L. 1962
5 18 R., H. 1964
5 19 R., M. 1966
5 20 R., L. 1966
5 21 S., G. 1966
5 22 S, M. 1965-1966
5 23 S., A. 1964-1965
5 24 S., H. 1966
5 25 S., L. 1948-1949
5 26 S., H. 1962-1969
5 27 S., A. 1965
5 28 S., R. 1962
5 29 S., E. 1971-1973
5 30 S., Ev. 1958-1977
5 31 S., J. 1964
5 32 S., R. 1980
5 33 S., S. 1962
5 34 S., L. 1962
5 35 S., M. 1964-1965
5 36 S., D. 1963
5 37 S., J. 1964
5 38 S., A. 1962
5 39 S., M. 1965
5 40 S., G. 1970-1971
5 41 S., K. 1962
5 42 S., H. 1966-1967
5 43 S., J. 1963
5 44 S., L. 1965
5 45 T., S. 1964
5 46 T., T. 1964
5 47 T., H. 1962
5 48 W., I. 1963-1964
5 49 W., R. 1966
5 50 W., J. 1961-1963
5 51 W., A. (1 of 3 folders) 1962-1975
5 52 W., A. (2 of 3 folders) 1962-1975
5 53 W., A. (3 of 3 folders) 1962-1975
5 54 W., G. 1968
Box Folder Title Date
6 1 W., I. 1964
6 2 W., B. 1962
6 3 W., M. 1961
6 4 W., F. 1964-1965
6 5 W., E. 1962
6 6 Y., N. 1964-1965
6 7 Z., A. 1965-1976
6 8 Z., R. 1970
6 9 Z., E. 1964
6 10 Z., M. 1965-1969
6 11 Z., A. 1961-1966
Box Folder Title Date
7 Sample Case Files 1961-1966

Subseries 2: General, 1962-1977

This subseries is in English and German.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 2 consists of five psychiatric reports that are not related to indemnification cases or could not be definitively associated to such cases.

Restrictions:

Access to Series V: Psychiatric Cases: Subseries 1 and 2 is restricted. Users may request a xerox copy of the medical report with names expunged, however, the copy cannot be released from the archives and must be returned before the user leaves the reading room.

Please contact: Leo Baeck Institute, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY 10011 lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org

Box Folder Title Date
6 12 Anonymous Female undated
6 13 C., W. 1967
6 14 M., E. 1962
6 15 S., E. 1965
6 16 S., C. 1976-1977

Subseries 3: Therapy Records, 1971-1980

This subseries is in English and German.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 3 contains two therapy protocols, one of which was written by Niederland and one by Dr. Abraham Braun.

Box Folder Title Date
6 17 Anonymous Male 1980
6 18 K. (female) 1971
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Series VI: Other Professional Activities and Interests, 1939-1989

This series is in English and German.
Four folders
Arrangement:

Topical arrangement

Scope and Content:

Series VI contains documents that represent Niederland's other professional interests, namely the Winterstein Case and Freud's famous patient, Daniel Paul Schreber. Included are court records, correspondence, publications by other psychiatrists and Niederland's own research notes on the subjects.

Subseries 1: The Winterstein Case, 1977-1978

This subseries is in German.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 1 contains material concerning a German court case, known as the Winterstein Affair. Erwin Winterstein and his son, Erwin Junior, were accused of having beaten up former SS members reassembling in the town of Würzburg. The Wintersteins, a Sinti family, had been persecuted by the Nazis. This subseries includes the decisions of two German courts (Inferior and Superior Legal Court) as well as Niederland's correspondence with German journalist Anita Geigges.

Box Folder Title Date
6 19 The Winterstein Case 1977-1978

Subseries 2: Daniel Paul Schreber Case, 1939-1989

This subseries is in English and German.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 2 contains documents concerning one of Niederland's major areas of research: The Schreber Case. Daniel Paul Schreber (1834-1911) was a head of senate at the higher level court of Dresden (Senatspräsident beim Oberlandesgericht), whose candidature for the Reichstag had failed. Schreber attempted suicide, was hospitalized several times, and developed hallucinations about being a woman. His case became famous when Freud later analyzed his diaries. Niederland, claiming that Schreber's childhood and his relationship with his father had been neglected by research, published many works on the case. This subseries contains Niederland's correspondence with three different publishing houses, four publications on Schreber and an article Daniel Schreber wrote himself in 1903 in which he claimed to have been restrained in the hospital against his will.

Box Folder Title Date
6 20 Correspondence 1973-1974
6 21 Publications 1903, 1939, 1960-1989
6 22 Research Notes undated
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Series VII: Clippings, 1949-1987

This series is in English and German.
Two folders
Arrangement:

Topical

Scope and Content:

Series VII consists of two folders of clippings. The first folder contains articles from newspapers and articles in regards to Holocaust-related subjects, in general, and Holocaust survivors, in particular. A representation of the German response to Niederland's theories and research is outlined in this series, as many of the articles are from German newspapers. The second folder consists of general clippings that are concerned with Niederland's other projects.

Box Folder Title Date
6 23 Holocaust and Holocaust Survivors 1964-1987
6 24 General 1949-1980
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Series VIII: Miscellaneous, 1964-1980

This series is in English and German.
One folder
Scope and Content:

Series VIII contains miscellaneous items, including handwritten notes, fragments of unidentified articles and several requests to William Niederland for autographs.

Box Folder Title Date
6 25 Miscellaneous undated, 1964-1980
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Series IX: Sample Psychiatric Cases for Researchers

35 folders
Scope and Content:

Series IX contains sample psychiatric opinions for indemnification cases that already have the names expunged and are available for researchers.

Box Folder Title Date
7 35 folders, sample psychiatric opinions for indemnification cases with names expunged
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