Guide to the Papers of Max Grünewald (1899-1992), 1735-1997 (bulk 1950-1990)
 
AR 7204 / MF 727

Processed by Lea Osborne

Leo Baeck Institute

Center for Jewish History

15 West 16th Street

New York, N.Y. 10011

Phone: (212) 744-6400

Fax: (212) 988-1305

Email: http://www.lbi.org/ask

URL: http://www.lbi.org

© 2006  Leo Baeck Institute
Finding aid was encoded by Lea Osborne on July 14, 2006. Description is in English.
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Descriptive Summary

Creator: Grünewald, Max, 1899-1992
Title: Max Grünewald Collection
Dates: 1735-1997
Dates: bulk 1950-1990
Abstract: This collection documents the personal and professional life of Max Grünewald (1899-1992) a rabbi in Mannheim, Germany, and the United States. His influence in the German Jewish American community was not limited to the synagogue, though, for he held prominent positions in several major Jewish organizations, including being chair of the American Federation of Jews from Central Europe, co-president of the Gustav Wurzweiler Foundation, vice-president of the Maimonides Institute, and cofounder and president of Leo Baeck Institute New York for more than thirty years. The bulk of the records is correspondence (both personal and professional) and research, in the form of handwritten manuscripts, research notes and index cards. Max Grünewald's personal records and writings are also well represented in the form of paper and audiovisual material.
Languages: The collection is in German, English, and Hebrew.
Quantity: 16 linear feet
Identification: AR 7204
Repository: Leo Baeck Institute
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Biographical Note

Max Grünewald had a long and distinguished career as a rabbi in Mannheim, Germany, and the United States. More than a spiritual leader of the Jewish American community, he held prominent positions in several major Jewish organizations, including being chair of the American Federation of Jews from Central Europe, co-president of the Gustav Wurzweiler Foundation, vice-president of the Maimonides Institute, and cofounder and president of Leo Baeck Institute New York for more than thirty years. He was a well respected individual who shifted easily from working with powerful Jewish leaders in Europe to leading intimate bible study classes out of his home in Milburn, New Jersey.

Max Israel Grünewald was born on December 4, 1899 in Upper Silesia, Germany. He was one of six children, four of whom survived. He had two brothers, Karl-David and Ernst, and one sister, Betty Hinden. Grünewald’s parents were Simon Grünewald and Klara Ostheimer. Little is known about his mother; however, Simon Grünewald was a Jewish elementary schoolmaster and director of the city’s trade schools in addition to being secretary of the local synagogue. Born in 1868 in Westphalen, Simon Grünewald attended the Teacher’s Seminary in Hanover and began his career teaching in the Lüneburger Heide followed by posts in Sorau and finally, Königshütte. Simon Grünewald died in Israel around 1921.

Grünewald grew up in Königshütte and attended the Jewish elementary school there (one of the few Jewish schools in Germany controlled by the state). At nine years old, he entered the Gymnasium. His father Simon Grünewald, upon taking over the role of Hauptlehrer, became his first teacher. A sickly child, he spent most of his vacation time at children’s homes and bathing resorts while the rest of the family went to Westphalia.

In the fall of 1917, Grünewald was tested for the army. Despite many illnesses during his youth, he was declared fit and entered at seventeen years old. This was at the final stages of World War I. Once enrolled, Grünewald was transported to the fortress Boyen in Lötzen, East Prussia, where he dragged guns up the walls of the fortress, learned to shoot and how to throw hand grenades. His experience in the military was one of tension and frustration, in particular his interactions with one of the corporals. In an oral history conducted years later, Grünewald remarked: "He [the corporal] remained for me a model of self-degradation, of abject humiliation. Today, I feel the shame, as if it were yesterday, the shame over a fellow Jew who played up to the wiles of soldiers and curried favor with gentiles."

Max Grünewald applied for a leave of absence from military duties in 1918 and enrolled as a medical student at the University of Breslau. He was not happy with the subject and met with historian Hugo Brann from the Jewish Theological Seminary, where he enrolled after completing his military duties. Since all seminary students had to study at the university as well, Grünewald was registered at both. He majored in philosophy, but took many other courses in psychology, economics and Semitic languages (mainly Babylonian). As a student, Grünewald made money by working as a visiting preacher. Some of the cities that he worked in were Berlin, Frankfurt am Main, and Goerlitz. He also substituted for Dr. Vogelstein, the rabbi of a new local synagogue.

One of his most influential teachers was Saul Horovitz who later became his father-in-law. Saul Horovitz was born in 1859. He studied at the University of Munich and became a rabbi in Bielitz (date unknown). Soon after, Horowitz was approached by Israel Lewy to join the faculty in Bielitz. Upon Lewy’s death, Horowitz took over the position of Seminarrabiner. He was extremely talented with languages and spoke Latin, Greek, Arabic, Persian and, of course, Hebrew. At Breslau, he was in charge of homiletics (sermons). He taught several courses, including medieval philosophy, which was an important part of the curriculum at Breslau. Saul Horovitz died in 1921.

Grünewald received a Doctorate of Philosophy (medieval philosophy) from the University of Breslau in July 1925 and concomitantly was ordained at the Jewish Theological Seminary. His rabbinical authorization occurred in two stages. First, he delivered a paper on medieval philosophy. The paper was concerned with the relationship of Maimonides ethics to Aristotle. Then, he wrote a rabbinic thesis (written in Rabbinic Hebrew), followed by an oral examination.

One year later, Max Grünewald married Hedwig Horovitz on February 1, 1926 in Breslau. Hedwig Horovitz Grünewald was born on November 27, 1896 in Breslau (now Wroclau, Poland), to Rosalie and Saul Horovitz. She had one brother, Dr. Willy Horovitz (of Switzerland), and two sisters, Mrs. Hanni Horovitz (of Jerusalem) and Mrs. Irma Rau (of Tel Aviv). Her great-grandfather was Moshe Bloch, the first rector of the Rabbinical Seminary in Budapest. Hedwig Grünewald attended the medical school at the University of Breslau where she focused on dermatology and was a practicing physician. The couple had two children. Their first son David was born around 1927 and died around 1934. Their second son, Ruben, was born on April 16, 1932.

After graduation, Max Grünewald held the post of Chief-Rabbi of the Mannheim Synagogue from April 1925 to March 1938. During this time, he was also president of the Mannheim Jewish community, a rare honor. After the Mannheim Synagogue was destroyed during the 1938 Kristallnacht, the Grünewalds fled to Palestine. Max Grünewald traveled back and forth between Palestine and the United States where he conducted research at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America (in New York City). He lived in Palestine until 1944, when he immigrated permanently to the United States and began working as an interim Rabbi for Congregation B’nai Israel in Millburn, New Jersey. Hedwig and Ruben Grünewald remained in Palestine until 1946, when they were able to immigrate to America. One year later, Max Grünewald became a naturalized citizen.

Grünewald’s professional life revolved around Congregation B’nai Israel, an egalitarian synagogue affiliated with the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism. He was rabbi and spiritual leader from May 15, 1944 to March 25, 1970. Besides running the services, he offered adult education classes and a lecture series entitled, "Evening with the Rabbi." On May 2, 1958, Grünewald was named Rabbi Emeritus of B’nai Israel. He was also a member of the executive committee of the New York Board of Rabbis.

Beginning in the early 1950s, Grünewald became very involved with several important Jewish organizations based in the New York area. He was President of the Jewish Philanthropic Fund of 1933, Inc., and one of the directors of the Ruth Gottscho Kidney Foundation, which is still in existence today. Grünewald was also a board member of the Maimonides Institute, an organization that provided education, training and research to mentally retarded and emotionally disturbed children, from 1961 to 1965, when he was named Vice-President.

In 1942, Grünewald co-founded the American Federation of Jews from Central Europe and was chair from 1952 to 1962. He was also a co-administrator of the Gustav Wurzweiler Foundation. This fund was created for charitable purposes by a former Mannheim resident named Wurzweiler. Grünewald was co-president from 1954 to 1985. Incidentally, it was monies received from both of those institutions, as well as the Claims Conference for Material Claims against Germany, which enabled the founding of another prominent German Jewish organization, the Leo Baeck Institute (LBI).

Max Grünewald was present at the very beginning of LBI’s founding in Jerusalem, at the home of Martin Buber, about a year or so before Leo Baeck died. In fact, all three Institutes, London, New York, and Jerusalem, were founded around the same time, 1954 to 1955. The initial goal of the LBI was to document the lives of Jews living in Germany from the time of the Enlightenment to the time of the Holocaust. After the founding, Grünewald remained an integral part of the Institute and was named president of the New York LBI in 1956, a position he held until 1985. In a retrospective article titled, "After Twenty-Five Years," from a 1980 issue of LBI News, Grünewald writes, "The Institute remains widely visible because the complex character of the German Jew appears also in the manifold expressions and functions of the Institute and because the Institute has an ethos of its own." His role as a leader of LBI was not limited to the United States, however, for Grünewald was also the International President of the organization from 1974 to May 1991.

The 1970s saw several major events occur in Max Grünewald’s life. He received two honorary degrees. The first was an honorary Doctorate in Philosophy from Bar Ilan University in Israel given to him in 1970. The second, given in 1975 by the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, was an honorary Doctorate in Divinity. It was during this time, though, that Hedwig Grünewald passed away. After battling various illnesses, she died on July 20, 1974. Shortly thereafter, B’nai Israel named its newly established nursery school after her, out of reverence for her interest in children’s health issues and their emotional wellbeing.

Max Grünewald continued to be involved in the physical expansion of B’nai Israel and the intellectual growth of the Leo Baeck Institute. He also maintained ties with other former Mannheim residents and took part in several reunions both in the United States and in Germany. For the 1987 reunion, Grünewald traveled to Mannheim in order to participate in the dedication of the new Mannheim synagogue. On December 28, 1992, Max Grünewald succumbed to cancer. The following year, the city of Mannheim named a square in his honor, the Rabbiner Max Grünewald Platz, illustrating his impact as a religious leader and an individual.

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Scope and Contents

Series I: Personal Records consists of the personal records of Max Grünewald, as well as documents belonging to other family members such as his wife, Hedwig Grünewald (neé Horovitz), his father-in-law, Saul Horovitz, and other individuals. The series has been divided into three subseries and within each, the records have been arranged topically. Hedwig Grünewald's records are predominantly condolence letters sent to her husband upon her death. There are also personal items, such as passports and academic documents, and a small group of her essays that were published in the B'nai Israel Bulletin. Correspondence between Hedwig and Max Grünewald during their separation are found here as well. Subseries 3: Saul Horovitz consists primarily of written material, most of which is undated. These writings have been divided up into general writings, which are shorter in length, essays, sermons and speeches. The subjects expounded upon are religious in nature, such as Jewish ethics, Judaism in various historical time periods, and Arabic and Islamic theology and philosophy.

Series II: Correspondence is composed of letters written to and by Max Grünewald while he was living in the United States. This is one of the largest sections of the collection and illuminates Grünewald's personal and professional life. The early correspondence was aquired during the first accession of the Grünewald estate and contains both personal and professional letters. His personal correspondence consists of cards and birthday acknowledgements, letters from family members and other correspondence with colleagues and friends. Certain individuals have been separated and placed under the heading, "notable." This is due to either their prominence within their respective field or to the nature of their relationship with Max Grünewald. The professional correspondence is composed of letters written by or to Max Grünewald in his capacity as Rabbi of B'nai Israel, as a professor at Jewish Theological Seminary, as the President of the Leo Baeck Institute New York, and as a board member for various organizations, such as the Gustav Wurzweiler Foundation and the Ruth Gottscho Kidney Foundation.

Series III: Jewish Organizations documents Max Grünewald's professional interests as a Rabbi and as an individual concerned with the political and religious activities of American Jews. These actitivies may take the form of an established internationally recognized organization or simply a loosely constructed group whose purpose is to accomplish a temporary goal. Contained here are a variety of records such as financial statements, meeting minutes, and proposals. The bulk of the material is in regards to Congregation B'nai Israel; other noteworthy organizations include the Leo Baeck Institute, the Gustav Wurzweiler Foundation, and the American Federation of Jews from Central Europe, Inc.

Series IV: Research contains materials presumably used by Max Grünewald for his personal and professional growth. Included are research notes on a variety of subjects, such as Jewish philosophy, general philosophy, Jewish family law, a short history of the Jews in Mannheim, and notes on the history of the Leo Baeck Institute. Most of these notes are written in Hebrew. There are also bibliographies of his library at B'nai Israel, and a few manuscript drafts. Miscellaneous items include poems by other authors, editing notes for Grünewald's own writings, and texts of speeches. The bulk of this section consists of index cards that list books from his personal library.

Max Grünewald's compositions are contained in Series V: Writings. While the majority of the texts are signed, those that are not have also been included here under the assumption that they too were created by him. The bulk of this series consists of work written in his capacity as Rabbi for Congregation B'nai Israel. Many of the essays and articles were printed in the synagogue's publication, the Bulletin. The topics of these pieces range from analyzing religious texts and grappling with philosophical questions to addressing the more practical, day-to-day events at the synagogue.

Series VI consists of printed material about Max Grünewald in the form of newspaper clippings, invitations, programs, postcards, writings, and press releases. The articles and clippings document Grünewald's career as a rabbi beginning with his early years in Mannheim throughout his tenure at B'nai Israel. Some of the publications include The Jewish News, Aufbau, The Record, The Item of Millburn and Short Hills, and, of course, the B'nai Israel Bulletin. The articles are not just limited to Grünewald's many accomplishments as a Rabbi, but also describe his work as an influential member of the German Jewish community living within the Northeastern United States.

Series VII visually documents the personal and professional life of Max Grünewald. Included are photographs of him as a youth in Germany as well as photographs depicting his role in the German Jewish community in the United States. In the latter category are pictures of Grünewald attending events at the Leo Baeck Institute during his tenure as President of the organization, receiving honorary degrees from the Jewish Theological Seminary, and meeting former West German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt. There are also quite a number of personal photographs of the Grünewald family.

Series VIII: A/V Materials holds reel to reel recordings of Max Grünewald's lectures and sermons during his time as Rabbi of B'nai Israel. Many of the reels contain not only Grünewald's sermons, but the entire service as well. Max Grünewald also offered a lecture series at the synagogue entitled, "Evening with the Rabbi." The topics of these talks ranged from examining the relationship between Judaism and Christianity to analyzing the impact religion and politics have on each other. The majority of these lectures were given in the mid-1960s, a time of much social change in the United States.

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Arrangement

This collection is arranged in eight series.

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Access and Use

Access Restrictions

Open to researchers.

Use Restrictions

There may be some restrictions on the use of the collection. For more information, contact:
Leo Baeck Institute, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY, 10011
email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org

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Related Material

Most of Max Grünewald's publications are held in the library. Please see the catalogue for a complete description of available texts. However, additional copies may be within the collection and are located in Series V: Writings.

In addition to the publications, the memoir of Simon Grünewald, Max Grünewald's father, is also housed in the archives of the Leo Baeck Institute. The call number of the memoir is ME 764. Please see the catalogue for full details.

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Separated Material

All offprints and books have been removed to the Leo Baeck Institute Library. If the text contained a dedication to Max Grünewald, a photocopy was made of the title page and the dedication was placed in a folder within the collection. The titles of the removed books may be found in the biblipgraphy section of Series IV: Research, Subseries 1: General.

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Microfilm

This collection has twenty-two microfilm reels.

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Preferred Citation

Published citations should take the following form:

Identification of item, date (if known); Max Grünewald Collection; AR 7204; box number; folder number; Leo Baeck Institute.

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Container List

 

Series I: Personal Records, 1787-1993

This series is in German, English, and Hebrew.
3.5 linear feet
Arrangement:

Topical

Scope and Content:

Series I: Personal Records consists of the personal records of Max Grünewald, as well as documents belonging to other family members such as his wife, Hedwig Grünewald (neé Horovitz), his father-in-law, Saul Horovitz, and other individuals. The series has been divided into three subseries and within each, the records have been arranged topically.

Subseries 1: Max Grünewald, 1787-1993

This subseries is in German and English.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 1 is composed of personal records documenting both his personal life and, in some select cases, his professional life as Rabbi of B'nai Israel. Contained within are academic records from the University of Breslau, accolades, which include birthday cards, congratulatory letters for rabbinical milestones, and printed material from his two honorary degrees, financial records, immigration records from attempts to immigrate to Palestine and the United States, biographical information, printed material from lectures and conferences he attended and, oftentimes spoke at, and obituaries and memorial notices.

The city of Mannheim is well documented in these records. Both material from the 1975 reunion and the 1990 reunion are included here, as well as correspondence from the 1920s to 1990, printed material, and newspaper clippings. Many of the clippings are available in photocopy form only as the originals were too brittle to be preserved.

Please note that there is a small amount of material from his father, Simon Grünewald, his grandfather on his mother's side, Israel Ostheimer, and Raphael Levy, his great-great grandfather on his mother's side.

Box Folder Title Date
1 1 Academic Records undated, 1914-1928
Box Folder Title Date
OSL 3 Academic Records (oversized)
Box Folder Title Date
1 2 Accolades-General undated, 1938, 1958-1992
Box Folder Title Date
OSL 3 Accolades-General (oversized)
Box Folder Title Date
1 3 Accolades-60th Birthdays 1969-1970
1 4 Accolades-75th Birthday 1974-1975
1 5 Accolades-90th Birthday (1 of 2 folders) 1989-1990
1 6 Accolades-90th Birthday (2 of 2 folders) 1989-1990
1 7 Accolades-Certificates (1 of 2 folders) undated, 1946-1970, 1984-1989
1 8 Accolades-Certificates (2 of 2 folders) undated, 1946-1970, 1984-1989
Box Folder Title Date
OSL 3 Accolades-Certificates (oversized)
Box Folder Title Date
1 9 Accolades-Honorary Degrees 1960, 1970-1976
Box Folder Title Date
OSL 3 Accolades-Honorary Degrees (oversized)
Box Folder Title Date
1 10 Accolades-Triple Anniversary 1965
1 11 Accolades-Rabbinical Anniversary 1976
1 12 Biographical Information undated, 1935, 1958, 1970-1977
1 13 Employment Records 1920-1938
1 14 Financial Records 1907-1914, 1938-1947 and 1968
1 15 Get Well and New Years Cards 1992
1 16 Grünewald, Simon undated, 1924, 1952-1962
1 17 Immigration Records-Palestine 1933-1947
1 18 Immigration Records-United States undated, 1938-1948
1 19 Lectures and Conferences 1942, 1961-1972
1 20 Levy, Raphael (became Ostheim) undated, 1787, 1812 and 1850
1 21 Obituaries and Memorial Notices 1992-1993
1 22 Ostheimer, Israel 1907 and 1920
1 23 Personal Records 1899, 1911, 1926-1927, 1934-1937
1 24 Printed Material undated, 1894-1904 and 1956
1 25 Restitution Claims undated, 1938-1947, 1957-1978
1 26 Retirement from B'nai Israel 1970-1973
Box Folder Title Date
2 1 Seventh World Congress of Jewish Studies (Jerusalem) 1977
2 2 Mannheim-Correspondence 1925, 1938, 1953-1954, 1977 and 1990
2 3 Mannheim-Newspaper Clippings undated, 1912, 1928-1932, 1975, 1986-1990
2 4 Mannheim-Printed Material undated, 1928-1938, 1987 and 1990
2 5 Mannheim-1975 Reunion 1964-1965 and 1975
2 6 Mannheim-1990 Reunion undated, 1938, 1989-1992
2 7 Miscellaneous 1914-1915, 1929-1937, 1960-1971 and 1987
Box Folder Title Date
OSL 3 Miscellaneous (realia) undated

Subseries 2: Hedwig Horovitz Grünewald, 1897-1976

This subseries is in German and English.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 2: Hedwig Horovitz Grünewald contains personal records, such as passports, report cards and other academic material, obituaries and memorial notices, material from her wedding with Max Grünewald, including correspondence and artwork, and copies of short essays that she wrote for the B'nai Israel Bulletin. Correspondence has been divided into three sections. The first, general, consists mainly of letters to and from Grünewald written during the time when he was in the United States and she was in Palestine with their son, Ruben. Condolence letters sent to Grünewald after her death in 1974 is the second grouping, the scope and breadth of which illustrate the impact that Hedwig Grünewald had on the Jewish community in the Greater New York area. These have been arranged alphabetically by the sender's last name. Finally, there is a small collection of love letters written from Max to Hedwig Grünewald during their courtship. Of interest is a short undated essay written presumably by Hedwig Grünewald's sister, Hanni Horovitz.

Box Folder Title Date
2 8 Accolades undated
2 9 Personal Records 1897, 1905-1926, 1938-1953 and 1963
2 10 General Correspondence undated, 1906-1931
2 11 General Correspondence 1932-1939
2 12 General Correspondence 1940-1941
2 13 General Correspondence 1967-1976
2 14 Condolences-A 1974
2 15 Condolences-B 1974
2 16 Condolences-C 1974
2 17 Condolences-D through E 1974
2 18 Condolences-F 1974
2 19 Condolences-G 1974
2 20 Condolences-H through J 1974
2 21 Condolences-K 1974
Box Folder Title Date
3 1 Condolences-L 1974
3 2 Condolences-M 1974
3 3 Condolences-N through O 1974
3 4 Condolences-P 1974
3 5 Condolences-R 1974
3 6 Condolences-S through Sh 1974
3 7 Condolences-Si through Sz 1974
3 8 Condolences-T through V 1974
3 9 Condolences-W through Z 1974
3 10 Condolences-Unknown Senders 1974
3 11 Early Letters from Max Grünewald (1 of 2 folders) undated, 1920-1926
3 12 Early Letters from Max Grünewald (2 of 2 folders) undated, 1920-1926
3 13 Horovitz, Hanni undated
3 14 Poetry undated
3 15 Wedding Records (includes correspondence) 1925-1926
3 16 Writings by Hedwig Grünewald undated, 1960-1969
3 17 Obituaries and Memorial Notices 1974
3 18 Miscellaneous undated, 1920-1937 and 1975

Subseries 3: Saul Horovitz, 1887-1922

This subseries is in German and Hebrew.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 3: Saul Horovitz consists predominantly of written material, most of which is undated. These writings have been divided up into general writings, which are shorter in length, essays, sermons and speeches. The subjects expounded upon are religious in nature, such as Arabic and Islamic theology, Jewish ethics, Judaism in various historical time periods, and philosophy. Please note that although these writings are being attributed to Saul Horovitz, only a small number of them contain his signature and thus can be confirmed as his work. The majority of the texts are untitled, therefore the titles listed here are simply summaries of the writings. Also included in this subseries are newspaper clippings containing articles by or about Saul Horovitz, printed material, and his Smichot (Rabbinical Certificates).

A) Personal and Professional Records

Box Folder Title Date
3 19 Correspondence 1896-1898
3 20 Newspaper Clippings undated, 1921-1929
3 21 Printed Material undated, 1916-1918 and 1925
3 22 Smichot (Rabbinical Certificates) 1887

B) General Writings

Box Folder Title Date
3 23 Darwinism undated
3 24 Development of Islamic Theology 1916
3 25 Doctrine of Revelation undated
3 26 In Defense of Judaism undated
3 27 Jewish Ethics undated
3 28 Judah Ha-Levi 1912
3 29 Judaism in the Hellenistic Era 1914
3 30 The Latest Exposition of Arab Philosophy undated
3 31 Manuscript undated
3 32 Midrash undated
3 33 The Nature of Religion 1915 December 19
3 34 On Services undated
3 35 Psychology and Homiletics undated
3 36 Research Notes (1 of 3 folders) undated
3 37 Research Notes (2 of 2 folders) undated
3 38 Research Notes (3 of 3 folders) undated
Box Folder Title Date
4 1 Review undated
4 2 Sources for Lectures undated
4 3 Sources of the Sefar undated
4 4 Systematic Philosophy of Religion undated
4 5 Teachings on God undated
4 6 Terminology undated
4 7 Travel Report of Ibrahim ben Jakob undated

C) Essays

Box Folder Title Date
4 8 Aristotle's Standing among the Jews of the Middle Ages undated and 1911
4 9 On the Talmud undated
4 10 The Sermon in Judaism undated
4 11 Since the End of the Middle Ages undated
4 12 The Study of Geography among Jews of the Middle Ages undated

D) Sermons

Box Folder Title Date
4 13 The Jews in Egypt 1890
4 14 Moral Philosophy of the Middle Ages undated
4 15 On the Kaiser's Birthday undated
4 16 Sermon of 1891 1891
4 17 Yom Kippur undated
4 18 Untitled undated

E) Speeches

Box Folder Title Date
4 19 50th Anniversary, Breslau Rabbinical Seminary undated
4 20 Jewish Ethics in the Middle Ages undated
Box Folder Title Date
4 21 Miscellaneous (includes realia) 1914-1922
Box   Title Date
OSL 3   Miscellaneous (oversized) undated
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Series II: Correspondence, 1925-1997

This series is in German, English, and Hebrew.
3 linear feet
Arrangement:

Topical

Scope and Content:

Series II: Correspondence is composed of letters written to and by Max Grünewald. This is one of the largest series in the collection and documents his personal and professional life.

This series has been organized into three subseries: Early Correspondence, Personal Correspondence, and Professional Correspondence. Records within each subseries have been arranged topically and within that chronologically and, in some cases, alphabetically. Any accompanying documents, such as essays, meeting minutes, or reports, remain with the original letters. In addition, notable individuals may be found in one or more of the subseries depending upon the length of the relationship Max Grünewald held with them as well as the nature of that relationship, in particular if he interacted with them on both a personal and professional level.

Subseries 1: Early Correspondence, 1925-1979

This subseries is in German, English, and Hebrew.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 1: Early Correspondence was acquired during the first accession of Grünewald's estate and is arranged in the following categories: incoming and outgoing correspondence, organization name or topic heading, and last name, first name, if the individual is of importance. This organizational structure is unique to this subseries and is Max Grünewald's original order. Personal and professional correspondence is completely integrated in the early correspondence. Some items of note are the correspondence and accompanying documents concerning the meetings of a German-Jewish Committee in which Grünewald expresses his opinions about the role of German Jews immediately following World War II, in particular issues of historical documentation and assimilation into American culture.

Box Folder Title Date
4 22 Breslan Memorial Volume 1951-1963
4 23 German-Jewish Committee undated, 1936-1946
4 24 German-Jewish History undated, 1948-1953
4 25 Immigration-General undated, 1948-1957
4 26 Immigration-Grünewald undated, 1938-1939
4 27 Incoming Correspondence-A through G 1936-1947
4 28 Incoming Correspondence-H through V 1936-1947
4 29 Incoming Correspondence-W through Z 1936-1947
4 30 Outgoing Correspondence-A through K 1934-1940
4 31 Outgoing Correspondence-L through Z 1934-1940
4 32 Outgoing Correspondence-A through L 1940-1948
4 33 Outgoing Correspondence-M through Z 1940-1948
4 34 Incoming and Outgoing Correspondence-A through F 1948-1979
4 35 Incoming and Outgoing Correspondence-G through J 1948-1979
4 36 Incoming and Outgoing Correspondence-K through N 1948-1979
4 37 Incoming and Outgoing Correspondence-O through Z 1948-1979
Box Folder Title Date
5 1 Jewish Theological Journal undated, 1932-1937
5 2 Jews in Baden and Mannheim 1946-1951
5 3 Neter, Mia undated, 1954-1975
5 4 Notable Individuals 1925-1938
5 5 Recommendation Letters undated, 1940-1943
5 6 Schlesinger, Kalmen undated, 1959-1973
5 7 Selfhelp of Émigrés from Central Europe, Inc. undated, 1940-1942
5 8 Miscellaneous 1939-1942, 1969-1972 and 1991

Subseries 2: Personal Correspondence, 1928-1997

This suberies is in German, English and Hebrew.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 2: Personal Correspondence consists of cards and birthday acknowledgements, letters from family members and other correspondence. Individuals have been organized alphabetically by last name and within that, chronologically. Certain individuals, for example, Kalman Schlesinger, Meir Fraenkel and Jenks Schachter, have been separated under the heading of "notable." This arrangement was based upon either their relationship with Max Grünewald or their reputation in their particular field. Miscellaneous items include letters from unidentified individuals and letters in which Grünewald has only been referred to or has been included as an indirect recipient.

A) General

Box Folder Title Date
5 9 Birthday Acknowledgements-60th 1959-1960
5 10 Birthday Acknowledgements-70th 1969
5 11 Birthday Acknowledgements-85th 1984

B) Family Members

Box Folder Title Date
5 12 Buenos Aires (unidentified) undated, 1973, 1988-1992
5 13 Gerlbard, Herta 1972-1974, 1990-1991
5 14 Grünewald Family undated, 1912, 1940-1959, 1973, 1991-1992
5 15 Hinden, Betty 1963, 1989-191
5 16 Hinden, J. 1947-1948
5 17 Horowitz, Hanna 1931, 1967-1974
5 18 Horowitz, Willy undated, 1930-1939, 1962-1991
5 19 Krakauer, Esther 1967-1973
5 20 Ostheimer Family 1910-1913
5 21 Prinz, Joachim undated, 1930-1937
5 22 Rau, Irma 1966-1974
5 23 Unidentified Individuals undated, 1913, 1958, 1973

C) Individuals

Box Folder Title Date
5 24 A through E 1928-1992
5 25 F through H 1928-1992
5 26 J through N 1928-1992
5 27 O through Z (and unidentified) 1928-1992

D) Notable Individuals

Box Folder Title Date
5 28 Belke, Inge (1 of 2 folders) 1964-1975 and 1989
5 29 Belke, Inge (2 of 2 folders) 1964-1975 and 1989
5 30 Blumenthal-Weiss, Ilse 1969-1985
5 31 Fraenkel, Meir 1955, 1961-1964 and 1975
5 32 Herzberg Arno 1988-1989
5 33 Milmed, Bella undated, 1950-1953
5 34 Schachter, Jenks and Max Grünewald 1961-1975, 1987-1988
5 35 Schlesinger, Kalman 1953-1972 and 1988
5 36 Stern-Michaelis, Eva undated, 1986-1991
5 37 Watzinger, Karl Otto 1978-1992
Box Folder Title Date
5 38 Miscellaneous 1970-1997

Subseries 3: Professional Correspondence, 1939-1992

This subseries is in German, English, and Hebrew.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 3: Professional Correspondence is composed of letters written by or to Max Grünewald in his capacity as Rabbi of B'nai Israel, as a professor at the Jewish Theological Seminary, as the President of the Leo Baeck Institute New York, and as a board member for various organizations, such as the Gustav Wurzweiler Foundation and the Ruth Gottscho Kidney Foundation. The correspondence has been organized topically and within that by name of individual or organization and then chronologically. There is also a small amount of letters in Hebrew.

A) General

Box Folder Title Date
5 39 Hebrew Correspondence-A through L 1940-1991
5 40 Hebrew Correspondence-M through Z 1940-1991
Box Folder Title Date
6 1 Individuals-A through J 1939-1991
6 2 Individuals-K through S 1939-1991
6 3 Individuals-U through Z 1939-1991
6 4 Letters to the Editor undated, 1962-1992

B) Congregation B'nai Israel

Box Folder Title Date
6 5 Acknowledgement Letters 1959-1970 and 1976
6 6 Board of Trustees 1946-1979 and 1991
6 7 Divorce Procedures undated, 1972-1974
6 8 Individuals-A through D 1948-1990
6 9 Individuals-E through Gl 1948-1990
6 10 Individuals-Go through Ka 1948-1990
6 11 Individuals-Ke through Le 1948-1990
6 12 Individuals-Li through N 1948-1990
6 13 Individuals-O through Sh 1948-1990
6 14 Individuals-Si through Z 1948-1990
6 15 Interfaith 1947-1951, 1965-1970
6 16 Jewish Community Council of Essex County 1950, 1962-1970
6 17 Jewish Education Association of Essex County 1964-1973
6 18 Millburn Township 1950-1976 and 1986
6 19 New York Board of Rabbis 1959-1970 and 1993
6 20 Notable Individuals-Flink, Salomon undated, 1968-1971 and 1989
6 21 Notable Individuals-Freundlich, Charles 1968-1977
6 22 Notable Individuals-Gray, Leonard undated, 1944-1950 and 1985
6 23 Notable Individuals-Leeds, Herman and Florence undated, 1966-1977 and 1991
6 24 Notable Individuals-Roberts, Marcus 1978-1980 and 1991
6 25 Notable Individuals-May, Milton undated, 1940-1955-1972
6 26 Notable Individuals-Weinberg, Mark 1957-1978 and 1985
6 27 Notable Individuals-Wische, Harry 1950-1951 and 1970
6 28 Other Rabbis in New Jersey 1958-1991
6 29 Rabbi's Charity Fund 1967-1970
6 30 "Release Time" 1953-1953
6 31 Reference Letters 1965-1973
6 32 Sabbatical 1960-1961
6 33 Scholarship Fund 1958-1960 and 1970
6 34 Social Action undated and 1968
6 35 State of Israel Bonds 1944-1953, 1963-1967

C) Organizations

Box Folder Title Date
7 1 General (non-Jewish) 1939-1978
7 2 American Federation of Jews from Central Europe, Inc. 1944-1945 and 1988
7 3 Gustav Wurzweiler Foundation 1950, 1960-1985
7 4 Jewish Theological Seminary (1 of 2 folders) undated, 1939-1940, 1952-1982
7 5 Jewish Theological Seminary (2 of 2 folders) undated, 1939-1940, 1952-1982
7 6 Leo Baeck Institute (1 of 2 folders) undated, 1954-1992
7 7 Leo Baeck Institute (2 of 2 folders) undated, 1954-1992
7 8 Maimonides Institute for Exceptional Children undated, 1960-1972
7 9 Ruth Gottscho Kidney Foundation undated, 1960-1970
7 10 Solomon Schechter Day School undated, 1960-1970
7 11 The United Synagogue of America 1965-1969
7 12 YIVO Institute for Jewish Research 1967-1968
7 13 Miscellaneous Jewish-A through J 1948-1991
7 14 Miscellaneous Jewish-K through Z 1948-1991
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Series III: Jewish Organizations, 1928-1995

This series is in German and English.
0.5 linear feet
Arrangement:

Topical

Scope and Content:

Series III: Jewish Organizations documents Grünewald's professional interests as a Rabbi and as an individual concerned with the political and religious activities of Jewish Americans. This series is arranged in two subseries: General Organizations and Congregation B'nai Israel and, within that, by topic.

Subseries 1: General Organizations, 1928-1992

This subseries is in German and English.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 1: General Organizations is composed of records from a variety of Jewish organizations that Grünewald belonged to and, in many cases, held prominent positions as a board member of. These records include financial statements, meeting minutes, printed material, such as clippings and conference programs, proposals, and some correspondence. The bulk of the correspondence may be found in Series II: Correspondence, Subseries 1 and Subseries 3. Some noteworthy organizations are the Gustav Wurzweiler Foundations, the Jewish Philanthropic Fund, and the Leo Baeck Institute in New York, all of which he served as President.

Box Folder Title Date
7 15 American Federation of Jews from Central Europe, Inc. undated, 1953-1964, 1988-1992
7 16 Conference on Jewish Material Claims against Germany 1954-1955
7 17 Council for the Protection of the Rights and Interests of Jews from Germany 1954-1955
7 18 Eppstein, Paul (memorial) undated, 1928-1947, 1959-1975
7 19 Gustav Wurzweiler Foundation undated, 1955-1984
7 20 Jewish Philanthropic Fund 1960-1969
7 21 Leo Baeck Institute (New York) undated, 1954-1992
7 22 Maimonides Institute 1963-1970
7 23 Organizations for the Blind undated, 1957-1966
7 24 Yad Vashem undated, 1945-1946
7 25 Miscellaneous Jewish Organizations undated, 1954-1992

Subseries 2: Congregation B'nai Israel, 1947-1995

This subseries is in English.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 2: Congregation B'nai Israel contains documents in regards to Grünewald's work as Rabbi of B'nai Israel, a post he held from 1944 to 1970. These files are mainly concerned with programs administered by the synagogue, renovation work, historic documents of the Millburn Jewish community, and artwork that was commissioned by the Board of Trustees. However, this subseries holds a scant amount of information regarding Grünewald's administrative duties as Rabbi and the relationship he had with his congregation. Records describing those topics are found in Series I: Correspondence, Subseries 3: Professional Correspondence, under the section, Congregation B'nai Israel. Here are letters addressing a much broader array of topics.

Box Folder Title Date
7 26 General 1957-1970 and 1989
7 27 Architecture and Artwork undated, 1948-1954, 1965-1970, 1980-1991
7 28 Board of Trustees 1957-1967, 1987-1990
7 29 Building Renovations 1947-1950
7 30 Dedication Ceremonies 1950-1956
7 31 Hebrew School undated, 1945-1970
7 32 Printed Material 1954-1992
7 33 Publications undated, 1942-1946, 1958-1976, 1987-1992
7 34 Religious Affairs Committee 1968-1970
7 35 Synagogue History 1981-1982 and 1995
7 36 Weekend Institutes undated, 1957-1960
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Series IV: Research, 1735-1993

This series is in German, English and Hebrew.
3.75 linear feet
Arrangement:

Topical

Scope and Content:

Series IV: Research contains materials presumably used by Grünewald for his personal and professional growth. The bulk of this series consists of index cards that were organized by author and title or by subject in German, English and Hebrew. The index cards have been placed in separate boxes.

Subseries 1: General, 1735-1993

This subseries is in German, English and Hebrew.
Scope and Content:

This subseries is composed of general research material used by Max Grünewald for his writings and his own personal interests. Included are also bibliographies of his library at B'nai Israel, and a few manuscript drafts. Miscellaneous items include poems by other authors, editing notes for Grünewald's own writings, and texts of speeches. A few photocopies of offprints and articles are to be found here, however, the majority have been placed in the Leo Baeck Institute's Library. A bibliography of the separated items has been included with the other bibliographies.

Box Folder Title Date
8 1 Articles and Offprints undated, 1735, 1916-1931, 1947, 1958-1968
8 2 Articles in Hebrew undated, 1945-1958 and 1979
8 3 Bibliographies undated and 1993
8 4 Manuscript Drafts (1 of 3 folders) undated, 1935 and 1974
8 5 Manuscript Drafts (2 of 2 folders) undated, 1935 and 1974
8 6 Manuscript Drafts (3 of 3 folders) undated, 1935 and 1974
8 7 Miscellaneous undated, 1929-1948, 1959, 1976, 1988-1991

Subseries 2: Index Cards, Undated, Undated

This subseries is in German, English and Hebrew.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 2: Index Cards documents Max Grünewald's research interests. These cards list books from his extensive personal library by author and title and by subject. There are also several boxes of cards written in Hebrew. This subseries has been physically separated from the rest of the collection and the cards placed into specially designed boxes, hence the numbering sequence is slightly different than the other records.

Box Folder Title Date
I-1 Author/Title-A through Ga undated
Box Folder Title Date
I-2 Author/Title-Ge through L undated
Box Folder Title Date
I-3 Author/Title-M through S undated
Box Folder Title Date
I-4 Author/Title-T through Z undated
Box Folder Title Date
I-5 Subject-Abbreviations through History (author M) undated
Box Folder Title Date
I-6 Subject-History (author N) through Liturgy (author H) undated
Box Folder Title Date
I-7 Liturgy (author J) through Zionism undated
I-7 Liturgy (author J) through Zionism (Continued) undated
Box Folder Title Date
I-8 Hebrew undated
Box Folder Title Date
I-9 Hebrew undated
Box Folder Title Date
I-10 Hebrew undated
Box Folder Title Date
I-11 1 Loose Cards-Author Entries (German) undated
I-11 2 Loose Cards-Author Entries (Hebrew) undated
I-11 3 Loose Cards-Subject Entries (A through D) undated
I-11 4 Loose Cards-Subject Entries (E through J) undated
I-11 5 Loose Cards-Subject Entries (K through O) undated
I-11 6 Loose Cards-Subject Entries (P through Z) undated
I-11 7 Loose Cards-Miscellaneous undated

Subseries 3: Research Notes, 1896-1974

This subseries is in German, English and Hebrew.
Scope and Content:

Subseries 3 holds research notes on a variety of subjects, such as Jewish philosophy, general philosophy, Jewish family law, a history of the Jews in Mannheim, and notes on the history of the Leo Baeck Institute. Most of these notes are written in Hebrew.

Box Folder Title Date
8 8 General (1 of 6 folders) undated, 1930-1936, 1960s
8 9 General (2 of 6 folders) undated, 1930-1936, 1960s
8 10 General (3 of 6 folders) undated, 1930-1936, 1960s
8 11 General (4 of 6 folders) undated, 1930-1936, 1960s
8 12 General (5 of 6 folders) undated, 1930-1936, 1960s
8 13 General (6 of 6 folders) undated, 1930-1936, 1960s
8 14 Festschriften undated, 1896, 1908, 1924, 1935-1950, 1962-1974
8 15 Rabbinical Literature (1 of 4 folders) undated
8 16 Rabbinical Literature (2 of 4 folders) undated
8 17 Rabbinical Literature (3 of 4 folders) undated
8 18 Rabbinical Literature (4 of 4 folders) undated
Box Folder Title Date
9 1 Religion (1 of 2 folders) undated
9 2 Religion (2 of 2 folders) undated
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Series V: Writings, 1922-1992

This series is in German and English.
1 linear foot
Arrangement:

Topical

Scope and Content:

Max Grünewald's compositions are contained in Series V: Writings. While the majority of the texts are signed, those that are not have also been included here under the assumption that they too were created by him. The bulk of this series consists of work written in his capacity as Rabbi for Congregation B'nai Israel. Many of the essays and articles were printed in the synagogue's publication, the Bulletin. The topics of these pieces range from analyzing religious texts and grappling with philosophical questions to addressing the more practical, day-to-day events at the synagogue.

Max Grünewald also wrote articles and essays for other publications like Aufbau, Jewish Spectator, and The Jewish Way. The scope and range of these writings reflect his interest in contemporary American politics, German Jewish history, education and the various roles that religion plays for both Jews and Christians.

Articles written before he moved to the United States (up to 1944) are held here under the title, Early Writings. Most of these writings are typed, yet there are handwritten essays in German, English and Hebrew.

Series V also holds book reviews written by Grünewald, poems, and texts of some of his lectures and sermons. Grünewald was not only a religious leader; he was a community leader as well. Therefore he was asked to speak at many special events in Milburn, such as building dedications and memorial services. The sermons contained in this series are only a representative sample; however, there are quite a few audio recordings of the sermons that may be found in Series VIII: A/V Material.

Box Folder Title Date
9 3 Book Reviews undated, 1929-1933, 1942-1948, 1961-1968
9 4 Early Writings undated, 1925, 1940-1944
9 5 Essays and Articles-General (1 of 3 folders) undated, 1931-1992
9 6 Essays and Articles-General (2 of 3 folders) undated, 1931-1992
9 7 Essays and Articles-General (3 of 3 folders) undated, 1931-1992
9 8 Essays and Articles-Autobiographical Sketches undated, 1966, 1977 and 1989
9 9 Essays and Articles-B'nai Israel Bulletin undated, 1948, 1966-1967, 1985-1991
9 10 Essays and Articles-Handwritten Drafts (1 of 3 folders) undated, 1956-1987
9 11 Essays and Articles-Handwritten Drafts (2 of 3 folders) undated, 1956-1987
9 12 Essays and Articles-Handwritten Drafts (3 of 3 folders) undated, 1956-1987
9 13 Essays and Articles-Other Publications (1 of 2 folders) undated, 1933-1983
9 14 Essays and Articles-Other Publications (2 of 2 folders) undated, 1933-1983
9 15 Lectures and Sermons (1 of 2 folders) undated, 1948-1991
9 16 Lectures and Sermons (2 of 2 folders) undated, 1948-1991
9 17 Letters to the Editor undated, 1952-1966, 1977-1992
9 18 Offprints (1 of 2 folders) undated, 1925-1947, 1957-1980
9 19 Offprints (2 of 2 folders) undated, 1925-1947, 1957-1980
9 20 Plays undated, 1930-1937, 1954-1961
Box Folder Title Date
10 1 Poetry undated, 1930-1937, 1954-1961
10 2 Translations undated, 1956 and 1966
10 3 Miscellaneous undated, 1949, 1956 and 1965
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Series VI: Printed Material, 1906-1995

This series is in German and English.
0.25 linear feet
Arrangement:

Topical

Scope and Content:

Series VI consists of printed material in the form of newspaper clippings, invitations, programs, postcards, writings, and press releases. The articles and clippings document Max Grünewald's career as a rabbi beginning with his early years in Mannheim throughout his tenure at B'nai Israel. Some of the publications include The Jewish News, Aufbau, The Record, The Item of Millburn and Short Hills, and, of course, the B'nai Israel Bulletin. The articles are not just limited to his many accomplishments as a Rabbi, but also describe his work as an influential member of the German Jewish community living within the Northeastern United States. Articles that are specifically concerned with the Leo Baeck Institute (and may not mention him specifically) have also been placed in this series.

The writings contained in this series here are not by Max Grünewald per se, but are connected to him in some way. The majority of the offprints and essays has dedications from the author to Grünewald and illustrate the impact he had on other scholars.

Of interest is Max Grünewald's Palestine postcard collection that dates from the early 1920s. There are also several memorial certificates for other members of the Grünewald family located with the miscellaneous materials.

Box Folder Title Date
10 4 General undated, 1932-1944, 1956-1975, 1985-1988
10 5 Articles and Clippings (1 of 2 folders) undated, 1935-1995
10 6 Articles and Clippings (2 of 2 folders) undated, 1935-1995
10 7 Palestine Postcard Collection undated
10 8 Press Releases 1973-1974
10 9 Writings by Other Authors (1 of 2 folders) undated, 1927-1929, 1945, 1964-1985
10 10 Writings by Other Authors (2 of 2 folders) undated, 1927-1929, 1945, 1964-1985
10 11 Writings Dedicated to Max Grünewald (1 of 2 folders) undated, 1906-1991
10 12 Writings Dedicated to Max Grünewald (2 of 2 folders) undated, 1906-1991
10 13 Miscellaneous undated, 1913-1944, 1959-1974
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Series VII: Photographs, 1905-1992

Eighteen Folders
Arrangement:

Topical

Scope and Content:

Series VII visually documents the personal and professional life of Max Grünewald. Included are photographs of him as a youth in Germany as well as photographs depicting his role in the German Jewish community in the United States. In the latter category are pictures of Grünewald attending events at the Leo Baeck Institute during his tenure as President of the organization, receiving honorary degrees from the Jewish Theological Seminary, and meeting former West German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt. There are also quite a number of personal photographs of the Grünewald family. Members held in this series consist of his wife, Hedwig, his son Ruben, and his parents, Simon and Klara Grünewald. David Grünewald, the firstborn son who died as a child, has several albums devoted to him.

Box Folder Title Date
10 14 Accolades 1976-1981
10 15 B'nai Israel undated, 1960s-1970s
10 16 Berlin Conference 1985 October
10 17 Family Members-David Grünewald undated, 1928-1933
10 18 Family Members-Extended Family undated and 1936
10 19 Family Members-Hedwig Grünewald undated
10 20 Family Members-Max and Hedwig Grünewald 1950s-1963
10 21 Family Members-Ruben Grünewald undated and 1969
10 22 Family Members-Simon and Klara Grünewald undated and 1979
10 23 Friends 1971-1987
10 24 Group Photographs (unidentified subjects) undated, 1928, 1960-1987
10 25 Headshots undated, 1970-1980
10 26 Helmut Schmidt and Max Grünewald 1980 November 19
10 27 Jewish Theological Seminary undated and 1974
10 28 Leo Baeck Institute 1960s-1970s
10 29 Mannheim undated, 1930s, 1987-1990
10 30 Religious Settings undated, 1950 and 1992
10 31 Max Grünewald as a Youth undated, 1905, 1916-1917, 1929 and 1935
10 32 Miscellaneous 1907-1927, 1987-1989
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Series VIII: A/V Materials, 1957-1983

This series is in English.
4 linear feet
Arrangement:

Topical

Scope and Content:

Series VIII: A/V Materials holds reel to reel recordings of Max Grünewald's lectures and sermons during his time as Rabbi of B'nai Israel. Many of the reels contain not only Grünewald's sermons, but the entire service as well. There are several guest speakers who were involved in the 40-40-20 celebration (which commemorated the forty years that Grünewald had been a Rabbi, the twenty years of his being Rabbi of B'nai Israel, and the forty years B'nai Israel had been in existence), such as Louis Finkelstein. More records concerning this ceremony may be found in Series I: Personal Records, Subseries 1: Max Grünewald, under Accolades and Series II: Correspondence, Subseries 3: Professional, under Congregation B'nai Israel.

Max Grünewald offered a lecture series at the synagogue entitled, "Evening with the Rabbi." The topics of these talks ranged from examining the relationship between Judaism and Christianity to analyzing the impact religion and politics have on each other. The majority of these lectures were given in the mid-1960s, a time of much social change in the United States.

Grünewald also acknowledged certain salient events in United States history in his sermons. Some of these milestones include memorial services held after the assassinations of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and President John F. Kennedy as well as an anniversary service for Kennedy one year later. Of particular interest is an audio tape containing an interview with Max Grünewald conducted in the mid-1980s.

A) 40-40-20

Box Folder Title Date
11 1 Evening of the Arts (1 of 2 reels) 1965 March 14
11 2 Evenin of the Arts (2 of 2 reels) 1965 March 14
11 3 Service and Oneg Shabbat Honoring Hedwig Grünewald 1965 March 19
11 4 Morton Kaye (guest speaker) 1965 March 20
11 5 Mincha Service (Dr. Finkelstein, guest speaker) 1965 March 21
11 6 Rabbi H. Weiner and Kurt Silberman 1965 March 26
11 7 Sabbath Service 1965 March 27
11 8 Banquet at Essex House 1965 March 27
11 9 "Old-Timers" Interviews 1965 April

B) Evening with the Rabbi

Box Folder Title Date
11 10 "Jewish-Christian Dialogue" 1959
11 11 "The Benefit of Doubt" 1964 January 12
11 12 "Alienation: Are We Strangers to Ourselves?" 1964 February 16
11 13 "Relationship with the Church and Synagogue, Old and New" 1964 March 15
11 14 "Are We Losing Our Distinctiveness?" 1965 January 15
11 15 "Religion and Politics" 1965 November 21
11 16 "Religion without God" 1966 February 27
Box Folder Title Date
12 1 "Nostalgia without God" 1966 November 13
12 2 "Where the Jew Failed Himself" 1967 January 15
12 3 "The Battle for Our Civilization" 1967 December 17
12 4 "Social Action Pros and Cons" (1 of 2 reels) 1969 March 23
12 5 "Social Action Pros and Cons" (2 of 2 reels) 1969 March 23
12 6 "Should an Atheist Build a Cathedral?" 1972 March 1972
12 7 Untitled Lecture 1972 October
12 8 "What Can One Generation Transmit to the Next?" 1974 January 13
12 9 "The Man Next to the King" 1974 January 13

C) Holidays

Box Folder Title Date
12 10 High Holy Day Sermon 1968
12 11 General 1957-1959
12 12 General (includes Torah dedication) 1960-1961
12 13 General 1961
12 14 General 1962
12 15 "Mystery to Ourselves" and "Loneliness" 1962
12 16 General 1963-1964
12 17 General 1964-1965
Box Folder Title Date
13 1 General 1965 October
13 2 General 1967
13 3 Rosh Hashanah 1969
13 4 "Reconciliation" 1969
13 5 General 1972 September
13 6 General 1973 October 5
13 7 Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur 1973
13 8 General 1974
13 9 "Every Generation Has It's Own Vocabulary" and "The Bible and Christianity" 1975

D) Sermons

Box Folder Title Date
13 10 "Confidence and Trust" undated
13 11 "Jewish-Christian Dialogue" and Holidays 1958-1959
13 12 John F. Kennedy Memorial Services 1963-1964
13 13 "The Theology of the 6,000,000" 1964 April 10
13 14 "Martin Buber" 1965 June
13 15 "Today Is the Birthday of the World" and Holidays 1966
13 16 "The Wall" and "The Unfinished Symphony" 1971
Box Folder Title Date
14 1 "Signatures" and "The Mourner Is the Comforter" 1975

E) Other

Box Folder Title Date
14 2 50th Anniversary of Rabbi Grünewald's Ordination 1976 June 12
14 3 65th Anniversary of B'nai Israel 199-
14 4 70th Birthday of Max Grünewald (S. Shunai, guest speaker) 1969 December 5
14 5 Adult Education Lecture-"Translations of the Bible" 1962 November
14 6 Annual Meeting 1974
14 7 Emergency Appeal by Max Grünewald 1973
14 8 Honorary Dinner (?) undated
14 9 Honoring Dr. and Mrs. Grünewald 1970 June 19
14 10 Honoring Dr. and Mrs. Grünewald 1970 June 20
14 11 "In Honor of Dr. Lowinger" 1959
14 12 Installation of Rabbi Mirelman 1975 November 9
14 13 Interview with Max Grünewald 1983 July 20
14 14 Memorial Service for Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 1968 April 16
14 15 Rabbi Max Grünewald's Retirement Dinner 1970 March 25
14 16 Tetimonial Dinner Honoring Max Grünewald (Essex House) 1959 November 22
14 17 Torah Dedication 1960 June
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