Guide to the Records of the Ostrowo Jewish Community Council
1822-1919

RG 13

Processed by Steven M. Lowenstein in the 1970s. Finding aid edited by Rivka Schiller, 2006. Additional processing and revision of finding aid by Violet Lutz, 2016.

YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

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©2017 YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. All rights reserved.
Center for Jewish History, Publisher.
Electronic finding aid was first converted to EAD 2002 by Yakov Sklyar in December 2006; the current version was encoded by Violet Lutz in September 2016. Description is in English.
February 14, 2018 dao links for folders 1-99 added by Leanora Lange. March 13, 2018 dao links for folders 100-178 added by Leanora Lange.

Descriptive Summary

Creator: Ostrowo Jewish Community Council
Title: Records of the Ostrowo Jewish Community Council
Dates:1822-1919
Abstract: The collection comprises a portion of the records of the Jewish community of Ostrów Wielkopolski, today in west-central Poland, in the Greater Poland Voivodeship. The region was annexed by Prussia in 1793, in the Second Partition of Poland; in German the town was known as Ostrowo. The records date mainly from 1834 to 1919, with a few materials from as early as 1823. During this period the town was part of the Posen (Poznań) region of Prussia and, after 1871, of the German Empire; in 1919, it was incorporated into the Second Republic of Poland. The community numbered nearly 2,000 members in the late 19th century and declined steadily thereafter due to migration of members to larger German cities or overseas; only a small Jewish community remained during the interwar period. The records are mainly those of the Jewish communal administration, or council; a small amount of material pertains to several community voluntary organizations. Included are financial records such as budgets, balance sheets, and tax lists; communal minutes and decisions throughout the period; correspondence with the government, and, to a lesser extent, with Jewish organizations and other Jewish communities; petitions from individual community members, especially pertaining to charitable aid in the mid to late 19th century; records pertaining to communal educational and religious institutions; records on the hiring and employment of community rabbis and other personnel, including application materials from candidates not hired; property records and mortgages; documentation of construction and renovation of communal buildings; records related to court cases, bequests, and estate and guardianship matters; and ephemera such as meeting notices and announcement fliers, as well as scattered clippings.
Languages: Predominantly in German, with some Hebrew, Yiddish, and Latin, and a few bilingual printed items in German and Polish.
Quantity: 12.3 linear feet (30 boxes).
Record Group Number: RG 13
Repository: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research
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Historical Note

The beginnings of the Ostrowo Jewish community under Polish rule

The town of Ostrów Wielkopolski, known in German as "Ostrowo," is today located in west-central Poland, in the Greater Poland Voivodeship. It lies some 25 km. southwest of Kalisz, and 115 km west of Łódź. The town was founded by a Polish nobleman in 1404. It received town privileges in 1564; however, by the beginning of the 18th century its economy was so weakened, in the wake of the plague and war, that its citizens relinquished town status in 1711 in order to reduce the tax burden. In 1714, the then owner, Count Jan Jerzy Przebendowski, of nearby Przygodzice, who was the Grand Treasurer of the Crown of Poland, reestablished the town, and strove to revive trade and crafts by attracting new settlers; among newcomers who arrived in 1717 were several Jews.

On 26 September 1724, Count Przebendowski issued the Jewish community a charter that granted certain trading privileges and right of residence in exchange for stipulated taxes and tributes. The geographic extent of the community was henceforth limited to the extent of the properties of the 12 Jewish householders then residing in Ostrowo, in a certain part of town known as the Jewish quarter; those property owners could in turn rent to other Jews. Before the end of the year, the community proceeded to establish a synagogue and a cemetery, both adjacent to its houses, as allowed under the charter.

In 1740 there were 79 Jews living in Ostrowo. Early in its history the community maintained close ties with the Jewish community in Kalisz, and did not employ its own rabbi, but had a shochet who was also the cantor. The first rabbi to serve in Ostrowo was Jakob Landé (son of rabbi Yitzhak Halevi Landé), who arrived in 1773 and served until his death in 1787. His successor was Rabbi Ze'ev Wolf, who served from 1787 until his death in 1806 or 1807.

In 1770 the Jewish quarter had 23 houses; among the owners were nine merchants, nine tailors, three furriers, and two physicians. As of 1779 there were 158 Jews residing in Ostrowo.

Prussian rule: Second Partition of Poland, 1793; Grand Duchy of Posen, 1815-1848; Prussian Province of Posen, 1848-1919

Ostrowo was located in territory annexed by the kingdom of Prussia in the Second Partition of Poland, in 1793, becoming part of the county (Kreis) of Adelnau (Odolanów), in the Prussian province of South Prussia.

In 1807, following Prussia's defeat in the Napoleonic wars, South Prussia was part of the territory that Prussia ceded to France under the Treaty of Tilsit, and which became part of the Duchy of Warsaw, a quasi-independent Polish state established by Napoleon, with Napoleon's ally Friedrich August I of Saxony serving as its monarch in a personal union. A few years later, following Napoleon's defeat, most of what had been South Prussia, including Adelnau county, reverted to Prussia, under the settlement reached at the Congress of Vienna, in 1815, becoming part of the newly constituted Grand Duchy of Posen, under Prussian control but with some promised cultural and economic autonomy intended to benefit the Polish population.

In 1816, approximately 52,000 Jews, or 42% of all Prussian Jews, lived in the newly established Grand Duchy of Posen, where they made up 6.4% of the total population.

The Posen region corresponded roughly to the historical region of "Greater Poland" (Polish: Wielkopolska), the core of the medieval kingdom of Poland (in the west-central part of present-day Poland). Besides the significant Jewish minority, the population of Posen was a mixture of Poles and Germans, with Poles predominating in most areas. There had been a small minority of Germans in the region dating back to the medieval period and, following the Prussian annexation, the German population steadily increased, as a result of governmental policy that promoted German settlement, and favored German language and culture. At the end of the 19th century the town of Ostrowo had a population that was approximately 60% Polish, 30% German, and 10% Jewish.

With respect to Jewish civil rights Posen took a separate development from the rest of Prussia. The Emancipation Edict of 1812, which formally granted Prussian Jews full citizenship status and (at least in principle) eliminated prohibitions against their entering certain professions, did not apply to Posen (which was not under Prussian control at the time). Civil rights for Jews in Posen were first addressed in a law dated June 1, 1833, applying specifically to the grand duchy, which gave the Jewish community the status of a corporation, specifying a certain governmental structure, with elected representatives; and set out conditions for community members to become naturalized Prussian citizens. Requirements for naturalization included an unblemished moral conduct; proof of permanent residence in Posen since 1815, or explicit permission to settle there at a later time; economic self-sufficiency, as demonstrated by occupational status or ownership of property; ability to use the German language in public life; and adoption of a fixed family name. Members deemed unqualified for naturalization were categorized as "tolerated Jews" and remained without basic rights such as the free choice of residence and occupation, and eligibility for public office. Under these stipulations naturalization proceeded in Posen at a slower pace than elsewhere in Prussia: by 1846 only 20% of Jews in Posen had been naturalized, compared to two thirds of Prussian Jews overall.

A Prussian law governing Jewish communities dated July 23, 1847 put naturalized Jews of Posen on an equal footing with other Prussian Jews, but still retained the distinction between naturalized and non-naturalized community members. In 1848, revolutionary unrest throughout the German lands included an unsuccessful Polish uprising against Prussian rule in Posen. The 1848 constitution that Prussia subsequently adopted (revised 1850) formally granted civil rights to all Jews under the clause concerning freedom of religion; and it incorporated what had been the grand duchy as a regular part of the Prussian state, as the Province of Posen.

The province of Posen was divided into two administrative regions (Regierungsbezirke): one centered in the city of Bromberg (Bydgoszcz), encompassing the northern and eastern parts; the other centered in the city of Posen (Poznań), comprising the western and southern parts. Adelnau county, where Ostrowo was located, was in the south of the Posen administrative region.

In 1871, following the Franco-Prussian war, the province of Posen, along with the rest of Prussia became part of the newly founded German Empire. In an administrative change in 1887, the eastern part of Adelnau county was split off as a separate entity, the Ostrowo county, with the town of Ostrowo as its seat.

During a Polish uprising in Ostrowo at the end of the First World War, an independent "Republic of Ostrów" was briefly established, from November 10 to 26, 1918. This local insurrection was followed by the region-wide Greater Poland uprising, in December of that year. Finally, under the Treaty of Versailles, in June 1919, most of the Posen province, including Ostrowo county, was ceded to the new Polish state, the Second Republic of Poland.

Further history of the Ostrowo Jewish community

In 1794, according to the first government census after the beginning of Prussian rule, there were 381 Jews in Ostrowo, making up 15% of the total population of 2,541. The community in 1794 included 31 tailors, the largest occupational group. By 1835 the Jewish community had grown to 1,256 individuals (267 families).

The synagogue built in 1724 was constructed of wood and stood until it was demolished, due to its poor condition, around 1860. The cornerstone for a new synagogue was laid in April 1857, and the Moorish-style building, designed by architect Moritz Landé, was completed in 1860. Gas lighting was installed in 1868; and a major renovation was carried out in 1900.

The first cemetery, established in the Jewish quarter in 1724 remained in use until September 1780. At that point the community was directed by the government to discontinue use of it within a short time, and to acquire grounds for a new cemetery away from the town center. Within the month, the community established the new cemetery in the locality of Krempa (Krępa), on the outskirts of town, on inherited land of Prince Radziwill, which it rented at a low yearly rate; in 1824, with Radziwill's permission, the cemetery was enlarged. In 1873 a mortuary was added.

The first schoolhouse, a wooden building, was erected in 1760. In 1835 the Jewish community established an elementary school of two classes that was recognized by and received the financial support of the Prussian government, with teachers who were government-licensed. A new building to house the school was constructed in 1841. In 1860, a religious school (Talmud Torah) was also established, funded by the Jewish community; in that year there were a total of 362 schoolchildren.

The community apparently had a mikveh (ritual bath house) as early as 1790. A new mikveh was erected circa 1841, in connection with the building of the new schoolhouse, and another new facility was built circa 1867.

A tragic incident occurred during services in the synagogue on the eve of Yom Kippur on October 11, 1872. The gas lights suddenly went out, leading to a false rumor that there was a fire. The ensuing panic in the women's section, from which a narrow staircase provided the only exit, led to the deaths of 14 women, two girls, and two younger children.

The size of the Jewish community reached its peak around 1861, when there were some 1,900 members, making up approximately 27% of the total Ostrowo population (approximately 7,000). The opening of a railroad line at Ostrowo in 1875 spurred industry and growth in the town overall; however, by this time the Jewish population was in decline. In Ostrowo, as in the rest of Posen in the late 19th century, younger Jews often moved away to larger German cities.

In 1871 the Jewish community comprised 1,612 members, and in 1890, it had further decreased to 1,079 members, making up 20% and 11% of the town's population, respectively, in those years. In 1900 the Ostrowo Jewish community numbered 756, or approximately 6% of the total population of the town (11,800).

In 1914 the Jewish community numbered 556, or a little less than 4% of the town's population. After the First World War, when Ostrowo became part of Poland, the Jewish population declined rapidly, with many members moving to larger German cities, or emigrating to the United States, or to Palestine. In 1921 the community numbered 170, or approximately 1% of the total population; in 1931 there were 49 Jews in the town.

Upon the German invasion of Poland, in September 1939, the German forces occupying the town destroyed the interior of the synagogue and subsequently used the building as a warehouse; both the old and the new cemeteries were destroyed as well.

Both Alicke (2008) and the Virtual Shtetl website, report that there were 66 Jews in Ostrów Wielkopolski in 1939, apparently based on local municipal records. Both those sources also indicate that in spring 1940 there were still remaining in the town a few Jews, who were at that time deported to the Łódź ghetto. Wein's Hebrew-language work Pinkas Hakehillot Polin (1999) gives a figure of 17 for the number of Jews residing in the town in 1939, and further reports that in December 1939 these last remaining Jews fled to some unknown destination.

Rabbis of the community in the 19th to 20th century

Rabbi Zvi (Hirsch) Peiser (also called Hirschele Charif) became the community's rabbi in 1807 (succeeding Ze'ev Wolf), and served until 1823. He was succeeded by Rabbi Menachem (Mannheim) Auerbach, from Lissa (born 1773), elected in 1823. Auerbach was the son of Rabbi Chaim Auerbach, then the rabbi of Lentschütz, in Congress Poland. During Auerbach's term, Joseph Pilz was dayan, or assistant rabbi (Dajan; Rabbinatsassessor), until 1833, and was succeeded in that role by Joseph David Holleschauer (1785-1860). Rabbi Auerbach died in March 1848, and the rabbi's post remained vacant for over a year.

In July 1849 Rabbi Aron Moses Stössel, of Neu Raußnitz, Moravia, was elected. During his time in office Stössel urged the building of a new synagogue to replace the old wooden one, and presided over the laying of the cornerstone in April 1857. He died in June 1861.

Following Stössel's death, the rabbi's post remained vacant for approximately a decade, although candidate searches were conducted at various points. During that time the rabbi's functions were carried out by the community's assistant rabbis (Rabbinatsassessoren) Nathan Holzmann (d. 1884) and Samuel Fränkel (d. 1878), as well as a third assistant rabbi, Moses Ungar, who was hired in 1865 (he had previously worked in Raschkow, and after several years in Ostrowo moved to Jutroschin, in 1870).

In 1861 the community conducted a search for a cantor qualified to introduce choral singing in the synagogue service, and hired Pinchas Haft, who remained in Ostrowo until at least 1864.

In May 1871, after the long interlude without a spiritual leader, the community selected as its new Rabbi Israel Meir Freimann (born 1830, Cracow), then the rabbi of Filehne. He served until his death in August 1884.

After Freimann's death, assistant rabbi Solomon Goldschmidt (d. 1897) fulfilled the rabbi's function until the election, in September 1885, of Rabbi Elias Plessner (born 1841, Berlin). Plessner served until his death in March 1898. His successor was Rabbi Samuel Freund (born 1868, Gleiwitz, Upper Silesia), who was inducted into office in November of the same year. Freund served in Ostrowo until 1907, when he departed to become the new rabbi for the community in the city of Hanover (where he died in 1939).

The last rabbi to serve in Ostrowo was Rabbi Leopold Neuhaus (born 1879, Rotenburg an der Fulda), who took up the post in 1908. When the town became part of Poland, in 1919, he moved to Leipzig, Germany. (Later a teacher and rabbi in Frankfurt am Main during the National Socialist period, he survived the Theresienstadt concentration camp; in 1946 he emigrated to the United States and settled in Detroit, where he died in 1954.)

The small Jewish community that remained in Ostrów Wielkopolski, Poland, during the interwar period did not have a permanent rabbi.

Secular leaders of the Ostrowo Jewish community

From its beginnings through the early 19th century, the Ostrowo community was led by a small number of community elders (early on the number was three or four, and by 1814 had grown to five). Beginning in 1834, in accordance with the 1833 Prussian law governing Jewish communities in Posen, the Ostrowo community established a council of elected leaders, consisting of an assembly of representatives, which in turn elected an executive body. The chair of the executive was the primary leader of the community; and the representatives' assembly also elected a chair. Community statutes (Gemeindestatut) were first drafted in 1834, and were revised on August 23, 1836. The statutes were revised again on May 7, 1877; and there was apparently also a later addendum to the statues dated June 3, 1901.

Following, with approximate years of service (gleaned, as best as possible, from the files in the present collection), are community members who served as chair (Vorsteher) of the community executive (Vorstand) from 1834 through the First World War:

Samuel Gerstmann, 1834-1837, 1841-1843
B. Marcuse, 1837-1839, 1840
Aron Berliner, 1839-1840
Nathan Lewi, 1844-1846
Abraham Cohn, 1846-1850
Baruch Berliner, 1850-1853
Mannheim Cohn Baum, 1853-1856
Louis Hellinger, 1856-1859, 1872-1873
Moritz Wehlau, 1860-1866, 1871-1872
Simon Spiro, 1866-1871
Moritz Pulvermann, 1873-1875
Josef Landé, 1876-1880s
David Goldstein, 1880s-1895
Fabian Fränkel, 1896-1898
Moritz Rothstein, 1901-1907
Jakob Krauskopf, 1908-1916

and those who served as chair of the representatives' assembly:

Jacob Wehlau, 1834-1837, 1840-1843, 1848-1852
M. Spiro, 1837-1840
Nathan Lewi, 1841
Mannes Hirsch Cohn, 1843-1845
M. Gerstmann, 1853-1855
J. Guttmann, 1855-1857
Boas Fraenkel, 1860-1862, 1866-1867, 1876-1877
Moritz Pulvermann, 1862-1864
Abraham Cohn, 1865-1866
H. Krauskopf, 1868-1873, 1878-1879, 1888-1892
M. Cohn Baum, 1876
S. Friedländer, 1883-1885
Lazarus Callomon, circa 1894
Isidor Herrmann, circa 1898
Marcus Callomon, 1902-1903
Isidor Voss, circa 1903-1916

From the mid 19th century on members of the Jewish community participated in the town government, including Nathan Friedländer, Heimann Krauskopf, Simon Spiro, and Max Spiro. David Goldstein was a member of the town council beginning in 1875 and a member of the magistrate (executive body) from 1882 until his death in 1910. In the early 20th century Jakob Krauskopf and Salo Josephi were members of the magistrate; and councillor (Justizrat) Isidor Voss and attorney Martin Goldschmidt were council members.

Postscript

No Jewish community was ever re-established in Ostrów Wielkopolski in the post-World War II period. In 2006, in an agreement with the Jewish community of Wrocław (earlier known in German as Breslau), the nearest organized Jewish community, the town of Ostrów Wielkopolski acquired ownership of the building that had formerly been the synagogue, and undertook a historic restoration of it, financed jointly with the European Union. At the same time the town agreed to construct lapidariums—memorial collections of the tombstone fragments—on the sites of the two former Jewish cemeteries. The restored synagogue opened in 2011 and is used as a venue for arts and cultural events; the lapidariums were completed in 2008.

References

Alicke, Klaus-Dieter (2008). Lexikon der jüdischen Gemeinden im deutschen Sprachraum. 3 vols. Güterloh: Güterloher Verlagshaus. Vol. 3. "Ostrowo (Posen)," cols. 3251-3252. Available online at: www.jüdische-gemeinden.de

Freimann, Aron (1896). Geschichte der Israelitischen Gemeinde Ostrowo. No place or publisher given. Contains a transcription of the community's 1724 charter, p. 18-22; and a list of community heads of households at the time of publication, p. 25-26. Available online full text via Google Books. JewishGen had made available an English translation, at the Ostrowo Wielkopolski home page in KehilaLinks.

Heppner, Aaron, and Isaak Herzberg (1911). Aus Vergangenheit und Gegenwart der Juden und der jüdischen Gemeinden in den Posener Landen. Koschmin and Bromberg. Vol. II, issue 17. "Ostrowo," p. 666-679. Online version in the Aron Freimann collection at the University of Frankfurt.

International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS). "Ostrow Wielkopolski." International Jewish Cemetery Project.

Virtual Shtetl. "Ostrów Wielkopolski." Originally a project of the Association of the Jewish Historical Institute of Poland, since 2012 the Virtual Shtetl website, www.sztetl.org.pl, is sponsored by the POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews.

Wasserman, Henry (2007). "Prussia." Michael Berenbaum and Fred Skolnik (Eds.), Encyclopaedia Judaica. 2nd ed. Ed. Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA. Vol. 16, p. 653-656.

Wein, Abraham, ed. (1999). Pinkas Hakehillot: Encyclopaedia of Jewish Communities: Poland, Volume VI: Districts Poznan and Pomerania; Gdansk. Jerusalem: Yad Vashem. "Ostrow Wielkopolski," p. 19-21. In Hebrew.

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Scope and Content Note

The collection comprises a portion of the records of the Jewish community of Ostrowo (today, Ostrów Wielkopolski, Poland, located in the Greater Poland Voivodeship). The records date mainly from 1834 to 1919, with a few scattered materials from as early as 1822; Ostrowo was located at this time in the Posen region of Prussia and, after 1871, of the German Empire. Originally Polish, it had been part of territory annexed by Prussia in 1793, in the Second Partition of Poland. In 1919, following the First World War, Ostrowo was incorporated into the Second Republic of Poland. Only a small Jewish community remained there in the interwar period. The records are mainly those of the Jewish communal administration, or council, of Ostrowo; a small amount of material pertains to individual Jewish voluntary organizations active in the community (found in Series IV, related to charitable aid).

Also included in the collection, in the last folder (Folder 178), is a fragment of a handwritten inventory list, partially in Yiddish, presumed to have been produced in YIVO Vilna, circa 1930s, which contains listings for the majority of the items in the present collection, as well as listings for some 40 volumes or folders that were not received by YIVO in New York after the war (see the Arrangement note for further details).

Financial records (Series IX) make up nearly 40% of the collection by extent, spanning the period 1834 to 1919 (with gaps within the runs of specific document types), including budgets, balance sheets, and tax lists, along with related correspondence, and relevant minutes and decisions of the communal administration, as well as account books and supporting documentation of income and expenses. The remainder of the collection represents substantial groupings of records pertaining to communal governance and Jewish civil rights (Series I); community membership (Series II); employment of community rabbis and other personnel (Series III); charitable aid (Series IV); education (Series V); religious institutions and communal property (Series VI); court cases (Series VII); and general correspondence and ephemera (Series VIII).

Series I documents the establishment of a communal governance structure and administrative procedures, as well as communal elections in the period from 1834 through the 1840s, and sporadically in later periods. Records related to community membership (Series II) pertain to citizenship status (i.e. naturalized or non-naturalized), in the period 1834 to 1848; departures from the community (1834-1850s); marriage banns (1834-1839); marriages (1836-1846); male Jewish births in excerpts from Adelnau county records (1847-1874); and ownership of synagogue seats, related to the new synagogue that opened in 1860. In addition, tax lists reflecting community membership are found among financial records (Subseries IX.1).

Concerning the employment of community personnel (Series III), the records are particularly notable for the rich documentation of the community's hiring process and negotiations with its head rabbis, covering a continuous period from 1843 until the end of the term of Rabbi Samuel Freund, in 1907; and also include biographical materials from the numerous rabbi candidates who were not hired. Records concerning the community's administration of charitable aid (Series IV), which range from 1834 to 1919, with gaps, include hundreds of petitions for aid from individual community members in the mid to late 19th century, as well as many appeals from outside Jewish organizations and other Jewish communities; several files relate to voluntary associations with charitable purposes (Folders 61-67).

Records on education (Series V) are partial, documenting the establishment and administration of the state-sanctioned Jewish elementary school from the time of its founding, in 1835, through the 1850s; and the administration of the Hebrew religious school, beginning with its statutes of 1899, through 1913.

Series VI, Religious institutions and communal property, contains much material related to construction, maintenance, and renovation of communal buildings, including the construction of a new mikveh (circa 1842), the new synagogue (1857-1860), and a mortuary (1873), and the renovation of the synagogue in the 1890s. Other materials include synagogue budgets, mortgage and property records, inventories of communal property, and documentation of bequests and gifts.

A small grouping of files pertaining to court cases (Series VII) in the early to mid 19th century includes three cases that relate to the 18th-century beginnings of the community, two having to do with obligations stipulated in the community's original charter of 1724, and a third related to a loan from the Catholic Church in 1760.

Series VIII contains additional correspondence, petitions, and communal decisions, on a variety of topics, as well as ephemera such as meeting notices and communal announcements.

Well over 90% of the collection by extent comprises bound volumes of records, as they were prepared in the community, most of them with their original covers intact, and inscribed with titles. In the inventory list below, the folder titles are taken from the original German titles of the volumes, and an English-language title is given on the following line. Occasionally, the cover of the volume may be missing; or, in a small number of instances, the materials arrived in the form of loose documents, without any original folders. In those cases, an English-language title is supplied; folders containing loose documents are specified as such in the folder description. Bound volumes generally contain at least 50 leaves, and sometimes 100 to 200 leaves or more; for smaller volumes (under 50 leaves) a leaf count is provided.

Under the system of communal governance established in 1834 there were two branches of the community leadership, a representatives' assembly and an executive body (Vorstand), also referred to as the administrative officers (Verwaltungs-Beamten). Most of the records are those of the community executive, with inclusion of its correspondence with the representatives' assembly. In the earliest period, until the mid 1840s, there are six volumes (Folders 1, 2, 6, 29, 46, and 127) labeled specifically as records of the representatives' assembly: "Acta der Repräsentanten-Versammlung"; when present, the latter reference has been transcribed, and appears at the end of the title. Records from the early period are otherwise labeled with the phrase "Acta der Verwaltungs-Beamten der israelitischen Corporation zu Ostrowo" (records of the administrative officers of the Jewish community of Ostrowo). Beginning in the 1850s the volumes are usually in file covers custom printed for the community, carrying a full printed title along the same lines; however, from the 1870s on, the file covers are of a different style, with the label "Synagogen-Gemeinde zu Ostrowo" (synagogue community of Ostrowo) at the top, and then simply the brief title "Acta" (records). Communal account books and supporting financial documentation (Subseries IX.2) are often labeled only with brief generic titles (e.g. "Ausgabe-Beläge").

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Arrangement

The great majority of the items are volumes of records that were bound and titled in the community. Many of the volumes have on the front cover what is apparently a location designation, indicating a shelf or compartment, and position number (e.g. "Fach 1, no. 1")—a labeling system that was applied in the community, likely reflecting how the volumes were stored. Those designations, when present, are included here in parentheses following the original German title. (Some volumes do not have such a designation, or are missing the cover; some have a designation beginning with "Litt." and a letter of the alphabet, reflecting what was apparently an alternative, or older, alphabetical system; and a small amount of material arrived as loose documents, with no original folders.) The series in the current arrangement are largely based on clusters of records that are apparent from the community's location designations, while further bringing together records of a similar nature whenever possible. The current arrangement represents a new arrangement compared to the one devised in an earlier processing completed in the 1970s.

This collection was part of the YIVO Archives in Vilna before the Second World War. A fragment of a handwritten inventory list presumed to be from YIVO Vilna survives, and is stored with the collection, in the last folder (Folder 178). It comprises the beginning and end of the list but is missing a middle portion that would have contained approximately half of the entries. The list enumerates items numbered up to 205, but since, in one instance, a single volume was itemized as 25 separate entries (no. 178 to 202), the list actually refers to approximately 181 volumes or folders. The first part of the Vilna list (up to no. 121) is based on the sequencing of the community's location designations; after that, the order does not reflect any particular arrangement.

During the initial processing of the collection in New York in the 1970s, it was determined that some 40 volumes/folders in the Vilna inventory were not among the materials that arrived in New York. The finding aid produced during this initial processing closely followed the Vilna list, including the latter 40 folder numbers as empty placeholders (approximately half of those folder numbers could be correlated to an entry in the fragmentary inventory list; for the others no information was available). On the other hand, some materials (especially booklets of supporting financial documents, and loose documents) were not apparently accounted for in the Vilna list. In the finding aid, the latter additional material was integrated into the folder number sequence by using the numbers 178 to 185 (essentially 'extra' numbers in the Vilna list, being among the 25 entries that were bracketed as referring to a single volume), plus the appended numbers F1 to F14, for additional financial records. In one instance (no. 99) loose material was assigned the number for a missing volume that pertained to the same topic.

The current arrangement encompasses only the materials in the present collection, without reference to materials that appear to be missing in comparison to the fragmentary Vilna inventory list; and the folders are simply numbered sequentially. A concordance of the old folder numbers with the current folder numbers is available for reference.

The collection is arranged in the following series:

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Access and Use

Access Restrictions

Permission to use the collection must be obtained from the YIVO Archivist.

Use Restrictions

Permission to publish part or parts of the collection must be obtained from the YIVO Archives.

For more information, contact:
YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY 10011
email: archives@yivo.cjh.org

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Related Material

Other records of the Ostrowo Jewish community can be found in the following locations:

In addition to the above materials in Poznań, small groupings of files related to the Ostrowo Jewish community are found in other Polish state archives, as detailed in the following publication: Quellen zur Geschichte der Juden in polnischen Archiven, edited by Stefi Jersch-Wenzel (München: Saur, 2003).

The YIVO Institute for Jewish Research also holds other records of Jewish communities in Germany, including: RG 14 Krotoschin (Krotoszyn) Jewish Community Council; RG 15 Briesen (Wąbrzeźno) Jewish Community Council; RG 244 Adelebsen Jewish Community; and RG 31 Germany (Vilna Archives) Collection, Series IV, containing smaller groupings of records of the Filehne (Wieleń), Raschkow (Raszków), and Rybnik communities.

Finally, the archives of the Leo Baeck Institute, New York, also at the Center for Jewish History, focuses on materials pertaining to the history and culture of German-speaking Jewry.

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Other Finding Aids

The earlier finding aid produced by Steven M. Lowenstein in the 1970s is on file at YIVO, as well as a concordance of the old and new folder numbers. Also, a fragment of a handwritten inventory list presumed to be from YIVO Vilna survives, and is stored with the collection, in Folder 178; see the Arrangement note for further details.

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Custodial History

The collection was acquired by the YIVO Archives in Vilna in the prewar period. During the German occupation of Vilna in 1942, these records were among the materials looted by the Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (a special task force of the National Socialist regime devoted to the plunder of art and cultural artifacts) and sent to the Institut zur Erforschung der Judenfrage (Institute for Study of the Jewish Question), an institution of the National Socialist Party (NSDAP), in Frankfurt am Main. In 1945 these records were among materials recovered by the U.S. Army and returned to the YIVO Institute in New York, via the U.S. Army archival depot in Offenbach. The records arrived at YIVO in New York in 1947.

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Preferred Citation

Published citations should read as follows:

Identification of item, date (if known); Records of the Ostrowo Jewish Community Council; RG 13; folder number; YIVO Institute for Jewish Research.

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Processing information

During the current processing the materials were transferred into new acid-free archival folders, and the folders were newly arranged and numbered sequentially (see the Arrangement note). The materials also underwent conservation treatment.

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Access Points

Click on a subject to search that term in the Center's catalog. Return to the Top of Page

Container List

 

Series I: Communal governance and Jewish civil rights, 1833-1916

In German, with one bilingual item in German and Polish.
12 folders
Arrangement:

Files related to regulations and procedures, generally in the order indicated from the community's labeling, are followed by files related to elections, in chronological sequence, and files pertaining to administrative infractions.

Scope and Content:

This series contains records pertaining to matters of communal governance, as well as the documentation of communal elections. Several of the files pertain primarily to the clarification of regulations and procedures (indicated by the phrase "Acta generalia," or general records, in the title). The records include correspondence with the government, and communal minutes and decisions setting rules and procedures under the government regulations (Folder 1), and specifically for such matters as the recording of vital statistics on members (Folder 3), the keeping of financial accounts (Folder 4), the naturalization of community members as Prussian citizens (Folders 5-6), and determining the financial obligation of departing members (Folder 7). The documentation of elections is only partial, including, in the earliest period, a file of the representatives' assembly, 1834-1846 (Folder 2), as well as fuller documentation in two later periods, 1862-1867 (Folders 8-9), and 1906-1916 (Folder 10).

The last two files in the series mainly concern administrative infractions of council members, with one volume pertaining to an investigation of two representatives for not keeping confidentiality (Folder 11); and the other, the issuing of fines on members, as well as police warnings and fines received by the community executive, regarding municipal infractions (Folder 12).

The formal framework for the Jewish communal representation and administration was set out in the June 1833 Prussian law governing Jewish communities in the Grand Duchy of Posen, which also specified conditions for community members to become naturalized Prussian citizens. Before this time, the community was led by a small group of elders. The new communal administration had two branches: first, a representatives' assembly (Repräsentanten-Versammlung, or -Collegium), elected by all the eligible voters of the community, as the main decision-making body; and second, a small group of administrative officers (Verwaltungs-Beamten), commonly referred to as the executive or governing board (Vorstand), who were, in turn, elected by the representatives' assembly, and were empowered to carry on administrative business in accordance with the decisions of the assembly. The chair of the executive body, often referred to as the community executive, or superintendent (Vorsteher), working in cooperation with the other executive members, was the primary representative of the community vis-à-vis the government and external organizations. The representatives' assembly was also led by a chair (Vorsteher), who acted as a liaison with the executive.

The election process, including verification of the list of eligible voters (with eligibility depending on community members' being sufficiently current with their tax contributions), and acceptance of election results, was overseen by the Prussian (later, the German) government via a local official in Ostrowo (Landrath) who gave reports to and obtained the approval of an interior ministry official in the city of Posen. The mayor, or chief magistrate, of the town officially inducted the Jewish community representatives into their offices.

Some noteworthy documents in this series include a list of community heads of household in 1833 (Folder 6), and a list of members naturalized in 1836 (Folder 5); and, in the elections file for 1906-1916, obituary materials related to several community representatives who died during that period (Folder 10).

BoxFolderTitleDate
1 1 Geschäftsführung, Bestimmungen, etc./ Acta generalia der Repräsentanten-Versammlung (Fach 1, No. 1)
Jewish community administration, government regulations, etc./ General records of the representatives' assembly
1834-1845
  

Correspondence with the government, 1834-1837; meeting notice and minutes of the representatives' assembly, 1837; and copies of three government circulars, 1842, 1845, dated from Posen, ministry of the interior, concerning the roles and responsibilities of the community's representatives and executive body. 21 leaves.

 
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1 2 Die Wahl und Anstellung der Korporations-Beamten/ Acta der Repräsentanten-Versammlung (Fach 1, No. 2)
Election and induction of community officers/ Records of the representatives' assembly
1834-1837, 1841-1846
  

Minutes/decisions of the representatives' assembly; correspondence with the government, and with the community executive; petitions; attestation; and meeting notice for induction of officers. Concerns elections of representatives, the executive body (Verwaltungs-Beamten), and the respective chairs (Vorsteher). Other topics include election of the treasurer (Kassen-Rendant), 1841; the formation of a Reklamations-Commission (committee to address petitions/complaints), 1844; the condition of the community building being used by cantor/shochet, 1846; and vacancy of cantor/shochet position, 1846. Petitions, 1843, are from Moritz Gerstmann, concerning voting eligibility, and Moritz Pulvermann, concerning the treasurer's position. Includes an attestation for M. Gerstmann signed by mayor Augustin. 38 leaves.

 
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1 3 Die Führung der Personen Standes Register/ Acta generalia (Fach 1, No. 3)
Keeping of a civil registry/ General records
1834-1835, 1839-1840, 1845-1847
  

Government regulations and correspondence concerning the community's responsibility to record births, marriages, divorces, and deaths. Includes a printed brochure, with parallel German and Polish text, containing regulations dated 1834. 20 leaves.

 
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1 4 Kassen- und Rechnungs-Sachen/ Acta generalia (Fach 1, No. 4)
Matters of the community treasury and financial accounts/ General records
1834, 1842-1846, 1869-1870
  

Government regulations and directives, and internal administrative rules concerning such matters as the setting of tax classes, collection of taxes, accounting, cash management, and budgets, with some sample forms. Includes printed instructions for the appraisal committee (Einschätzungs-Commission) of the Jewish community, responsible for determining tax contributions of members; and the approved regulation drafted by the Ostrowo community, 1842. A government circular of May 1842 contains clarifications of the departure tax (Abzugsgeld) and kosher meat tax (Krupke). 35 leaves.

 
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1 5 Die bürgerlichen und Kommunal-Verhältnisse, Naturalisirung/ Acta generalia (Fach 1, No. 5)
Jewish civil rights and municipal status; naturalization of community members/ General records
1834-1836, 1843-1845
  

Correspondence with the government, including decrees and circulars. One item is an official list, with signatures, of 35 members who took citizenship oaths in June 1836, including Rabbi Mannheim Auerbach. 21 leaves.

 
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1 6 Die bürgerlichen und Kommunal-Verhältnisse/ Acta der Repräsentanten-Versammlung (Fach 3, No. 1)
Jewish civil rights and municipal status/ Records of the representatives' assembly
1833-1837
  

Copy of royal decree, Berlin, November, 1833; list of community heads of households, August 1833, with marriage status, number of children/household members, profession, and whether entitled to vote (stimmberechtigt); correspondence of representatives' assembly with the government, 1836, concerning regulations and Jewish civil rights. Other items/topics: Letter from the government, July 1834, referring to an association for support of the poor ("Brüder der heiligen Pflicht") founded in the Jewish community of Jaratschewo. Letter of complaint to the president of province Posen Flottwell from representatives Wehlau, Landé and Bloch, February 1836, with response. Communications from the community executive to the representatives' assembly clarifying regulations, 1836, and providing a list of 66 villages belonging to the Ostrowo community, 1837. 27 leaves.

 
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1 7 Die Umzüge der Korporations-Mitglieder und Ablösung derselben/ Acta generalia (Fach 1, No. 7)
Migration of community members and the settling of their accounts upon their departure/ General records
1840, 1851-1870
  

Correspondence with the government, including government circulars concerning regulations. Also includes one decision of the community executive, January 1868; and one letter from the Jewish community in Gnesen (Gniezno), August 1868, with a copy of the response from the Ostrowo community, concerning the interpretation of the regulations in cases when members move more than once, either within Posen or to a different province, and whether the departing financial obligation to the community needs to be assessed each time, or could be regarded as fulfilled after the first move. 27 leaves.

 
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1 8 Die Organisirung der Korporations-Verwaltung, Wahl der Verwaltungs-Beamten und Repräsentanten sowie der einzelnen Verwaltungs-Kommissione (Fach 2, No. 2)
Organization of the community administration, election and induction of administrative officers and representatives, as well as particular administrative commissions
1862-1866
  

Communal announcements; lists of eligible voters; decisions of the representatives' assembly and executive; executive reports on election meetings; correspondence among the assembly, the executive, and the government; and one set of community accounts (May 1866) at the close of Moritz Wehlau's term as executive chair. Decisions of the community include the organization of representatives into various "commissions" with specific responsibilities; in January 1865 there were six: Synagogen-Vorstand (synagogue), Armen-Commission (poor relief), Bau-Commission (construction), Kassen- und Revisions-Commission (cash management and audit), Commission für das Beerdigungswesen (burial matters), and Quellbad-Commission (mikveh; merged into the Bau-Commission in August of same year). In July 1865 chair Moritz Wehlau writes at length to the assembly upon his reelection, with reference to general matters of community governance.

 
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1 9 Die Wahlen der Gemeindebehörden und die Bildung von Verwaltungs-Kommissionen (Fach 2, No. 3, vol. III)
Election of community authorities, and formation of administrative commissions
1866-1867
  

Correspondence between the representatives' assembly and the executive, including minutes of the assembly; communal election meeting minutes of December 1866; correspondence with the government, including election regulations; and communal announcement. The announcement, April 1867, concerns the requirement for members to be up to date in tax contributions in order to be eligible to vote. Of correspondence to the government, one item, March 1867, concerns the fining of representative Moritz Pulvermann for missing several meetings; and another, July 1867, is a petition from Boas Fraenkel, chair of the representatives' assembly, recounting his service in the community administration since 1860 and expressing his wish to resign.

 
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1 10 Die Wahlen der Gemeindebehörden und die Bildung von Verwaltungs-Kommissionen (Fach 2, No. 11, vol. V)
Election of community authorities, and formation of administrative commissions
1906-1916
  

Correspondence of the executive with the representatives' assembly and the government; communal election meeting minutes; lists of eligible voters (related materials concerning tax contributions); drafts and newspaper clippings of announcements about elections; resignation letters; and items such as newspaper clippings and draft obituaries related to the deaths of representatives or executive members. The latter material relates to the deaths of the following individuals: Moritz Rothstein, 1907 (including a thank-you letter from his son Leo); Fabian Fränkel, 1909; Jacob Stillschweig, 1910; David Goldstein, 1910; Max Brandt, Abraham Brandt and Salo Brandt, all in 1913; Hermann Remak, 1914; Simon Wisch, 1915; Isidor Voss, 1916; and Simon Friedmann, circa 1916. In 1907-1908 some correspondence relates to a petition submitted to the Posen provincial president by community member Ephraim Markus, contesting certain points of an election. A few items in March 1916 pertain to the 60th birthday of community chair Jakob Krauskopf.

 
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1 11 Die Untersuchung wider beiden Repräsentanten Baruch Krotoszyner und Aron Zellner (Lit. K, No. 34)
Investigation of the representatives Baruch Krotoszyner and Aron Zellner
1836
  

Subtitle reads: "wegen Anschwatzung ihres Vorstehers und Nicht-Verschweigung der in ihren Sitzungen gepflogenen Unterhandlungen" (for insubordination against the chair and failing to hold the assembly's proceedings confidential). Includes minutes and correspondence of the investigation, specifically the following three items: minutes of a session over two days, at which the community executive, Samuel Gerstmann, received a formal complaint in the matter, brought forth by Jacob Wehlau, chair of the representatives' assembly, and heard testimony of five community members: Baruch Bloch, Isaac Callomon, David Fuchs, Jacob Guttmann, and Joachim Stern; a further written statement received from Callomon, along with the response of the council; and minutes of an additional session at which Aron Zellner testified. The complaint alleged an infringement of the two men against a regulation of July 1834, requiring that members refrain from divulging on their own the discussion and decisions of the assembly. The specific instances concerned their communications to Isaac Callomon and David Fuchs about details of financial decisions that affected those two individuals, related to the budget for 1836. Gathering of 8 leaves.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
2 12 Ordnungs- und Polizeistrafen (Fach 2, No. 4)
Community fines for administrative infractions, and police fines
1834-1869, 1873-1874, 1886
  

Communal minutes/decisions; correspondence among the representatives' assembly, the executive, and the government; and petitions from members. The majority of items pertain to fines of representatives for unexcused absences from meetings; in one instance, a complaint is brought by the executive against the representatives' assembly for lax procedure (April 1847, bound in after 1857). Some items pertain to Ostrowo police fines, or warnings, of the community executive for infringements against municipal ordinances, including a printed form in March 1858, and all of the items dated from 1873 on (three in 1873-1874 and one in 1886), concerning failure to keep the street clean outside of communal property, or carrying on construction without the appropriate permit.

 
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Series II: Community membership, 1834-1887, 1908-1915

In German, with occasional use of Yiddish or Hebrew.
16 folders
Arrangement:

Arranged generally in chronological order, with like records grouped together; records concerning naturalization of members and members' departures from the community are followed by volumes related to marriage banns, marriages, male births, and ownership of synagogue seats.

Scope and Content:

This series contains records pertaining to the community's membership, specifically matters of naturalization, or status as non-naturalized ("tolerated"); departures from the community; wedding banns; marriages; male births; and the ownership or rental of synagogue seats.

The records related to applications for naturalization (Folders 13-14) pertain to the period between the enactment of the 1833 law governing Jewish communities in Posen, which set out requirements for naturalization, and the adoption of the Prussian constitution in 1848/1850, under which all Jews in the kingdom formally became citizens on an equal footing. Members needed to meet certain qualifications to become naturalized, and to be certified as qualified by the community council. The communal officials also were required to keep a record of community members who did not qualify for naturalization (Folder 15), and were categorized as "tolerated" (geduldet).

Records related to members' moving away from the community (Folder 16-17), spanning the period 1834 through the 1850s, pertain to their negotiation of a final payment to the community (Abzugsgeld), amounting to a departure tax. Jews who possessed a patent of naturalization could freely choose their residence and move anywhere within Prussia, while non-naturalized Jews were subject to restrictions.

The records related to marriage banns (Aufgebot), 1834-1839 (Folder 18), have to do with a general government requirement that religious communities make public announcements of intended marriages. Also included is a fragmentary registry of Jewish marriages, 1836-1845 (Folder 19), as well as a slim booklet containing a certification that the community recorded no divorces in 1846 (Folder 20). These records would seem to represent a small surviving part of the civil records (on births, marriages, divorces, and deaths) that the community was required to keep (see Folder 3 in Series I).

The records on Jewish male births, 1859-1874 (Folder 21), were compiled in response to a government directive of 1859, which required the community to ascertain whether young members were residing outside of the community at the time they came of age, in which case they needed to meet their financial obligation as departing members. This file contains excerpts from the Adelnau county records that cover all male Jewish births in the county.

Records pertaining to synagogue seats (Folders 22-28), dated 1858 to 1915, concern seats in the new synagogue, which was under construction since 1857 and opened in 1860.

BoxFolderTitleDate
2 13 Die Naturalisirung der Korporations Mitglieder (Fach 9, No. 1)
Naturalization of community members
1834-1845
  

Communal minutes/decisions; meeting notices; correspondence with the government; petitions; and handwritten lists or printed forms with detailed entries concerning individuals the community council certifies as qualifying for naturalization. The information recorded in the forms includes age; number of family members; birthplace; whether willing to pledge to use German in public matters; details regarding profession, property and income; any notable patriotic service; and whether conduct is without blemish or any criminal record. Also: List indicating name changes upon naturalization (f. 21). Individuals for whom biographical data is detailed on lists/forms include: Isac Simonsohn, David Grabowski, Mannes Abarbanel, Heimann Hirsch, Mendel Berliner, Moses Mendel Liebes, Moritz Kleczewsky, Moritz Brand, Jacob Baer, Moses Schajer, Elimelech Lewi, Moritz David Fraenkel, Joseph Cohn, Louis Aettinger, Sina Holzmann, Moritz Gerstmann, Jacob Stahl, Marcus Mannheim, Julius Gross, Jacob Hirsch Müller, Salomon Schildberger, Bendet Hoffmann, Nathan Peiser, Arnold Gerstmann, Moses Callomon, Ernst Herrmann, Meyer Auerbach, Julius Laser, Robert Cohn, Moritz Callomon, and Josef Gerson Ledermann. Individuals represented with petitions in their own hand: Abraham Hirsch Rittenband (f. 12, 42), Mannes Abarbanel, Aron Grabowski, Moritz Apt (f. 50-51), Michael Brockman, Joseph Pieprz, Jacob Baer, Heimann Hirsch, Nathan Peiser, Bendet Hoffmann, Moses Callomon, Ernst Herrmann, and Meier Kleczcewski. In the case of Pincus Seidel, of Olobok, minutes of that community are included (f. 26-27). The leaves in approximately the first half of the volume are numbered, in red or plain pencil, roughly 1 to 99.

 
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2 14 Naturalization of community members
undated, 1844
  

Loose documents (8 items), of a similar nature to those found in the bound volume above but not officially acted upon. Includes printed forms for Samuel Neumann (two copies) and Moritz Callomon, both with biographical data completed but not officially executed by the council. Also includes a petition from "Samuel Nossen, alias Neumann," without signature; and signed petitions from Moritz Kleczewski and Jacob Littwitz that both lack any evidence of council action or response. Also: two blank forms (the first with only the name "Julius" written in), identical in content but with slightly different typography.

 
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2 15 Die geduldeten Korporationsmitglieder (Fach 9, No. 3)
"Tolerated" community members (i.e. those not qualified for naturalization)
1835-1848
  

Correspondence with the government, and annual lists of tolerated Jews, certified by the communal council. A few items are communal announcements/minutes about the distribution of government-issued certificates of toleration, with signatures (some in Yiddish) of members acknowledging receipt (f. 1, 2, 22). Correspondence is typically with a provincial office in Ostrowo; in December 1847 to January 1848 several items comprise exchanges with offices in Przygodzice, Podkoce, Lewkow, and Zmyslona, concerning the presence of non-naturalized Jews in those districts; a response from Zmyslona includes a form listing Schmul Hirsch and Heimann Hirsch, and their wives and children. The lists of tolerated members include the following data: name, age, and profession of head of household; number of adults and children in household; and information about naturalization status, toleration certificate, and length of residence in Posen province and in Ostrowo (or a nearby village). Lists are included for the following years: 1837 (122 names); 1839 (144 names); 1840 (160 names); 1842 (128 names); and 1845/46 (159 names). The leaves in approximately the first half of the volume are numbered, in red or plain pencil, 1 to 31, with three booklets of lists intervening, whose leaves are unnumbered.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
3 16 Die Umzüge der Korporations-Mitglieder und Abfindung derselben (Fach 6, No. 2, Vol. I/Vol. II)
Migration of community members and the settling of their accounts upon their departure
1834-1845, 1853
  

Petitions and communal minutes/decisions; correspondence with petitioners and the government; attestations of permission to move (Abzugsattest); and receipts for payments (Abzugsgeld). Individuals represented: Gerson Fischel; Abraham Buchwald, for daughter Keile; Cheim Baruch; Isac Lewinsohn; David Brann; Abraham Stahl; Gabriel Jakob; Israel Sobotker; Heiman Saberski; Philippine (Feigelche) Berger, née Urban; Aron Grabowski; Jacob Wehlau; Jacob Guttmann; Aron Zellner; Isac Jacobsohn; Lippmann Zuckermann; Meyer Gloczewski; Joseph Belz; Abraham Cohn; Aron Berliner, for son Meyer; Moses Feldmann; Beile Gemple; Mannes Kaliski; Moses Lewkowicz; Bär Wolf; Abraham Weiss, for daughter Mannes; Jacob Labischiner; Löbel Labaszin; Gittel Labischiner; Itzig Nossen; Markus Kozminski; Alexander Müller; Abraham Hirsch Lissner; Moses Löbel Silberstein; Abraham Rosenthal; Marcus Kluge; Gerson Landsberg; Abraham Ritterband; Beniamen Weiss; Hirsch Simon, for son Philipp; Mannes Abarbanel; Natan Raszkower; Moritz Guttmann; Samuel Leib Hoffmann; Meyer Michel Brackmann; Jacob Baer; Herrmann Lewy; Abraham Kloss; Herrmann Gins; A. Klapper; Aron Ansorge; Elkan Turk; Julius Marcus; M. Schall and son Lazarus Götz; Wolf Wagner; Moritz David Fraenkel; A. Lewy; Joachim Stern; Meyer Grabowski; Moritz Apt; J. Feldmann, for son Simon; David Braun; Hanne Loebel; Rivka Zuckermann; Abraham Prinz; Rachel Labischiner, concerning son Jacob Labischiner, and birth attestation for son Michael Brockmann; Abraham Korn; Albert Landé; Moses Hirsch Cohn; Meyer Auerbach; Baruch Goldmann; Isaac Wolff; R. Wiener; Israel Rosin; Hirsch Hirschberg; Moses Lissner; A. L. Landau; Wolf Gallewska; and Abraham Weissbein. F. 174 is missing a fragment. Leaves of the volume are numbered, in red pencil or brown ink, 1 to 201. In German with some Yiddish (f. 178).

 
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3 17 Umzüge und Ablösung der Korporations-Mitglieder (Fach 6, No. 4, Vol. III)
Migration of community members and the settling of their accounts upon their departure
1848-1857, 1860
  

Petitions and communal minutes/decisions; statements (Berechnung) of amounts owed; correspondence with petitioners and the government; and petitions or inquiries originating in the community to which the individual has moved (f. 109, 181, 206, 226). Individuals represented: Arnold Gerstmann, Breslau (1848-1853, f. 1-32); Abraham Wislitzki, Breslau (1850-1851, f. 33-40); Samuel Nelken, Breslau (1848-1853, f. 41-67); Jacob Cohnstaedt, Zduny (1848-1853, f. 68-89); Hermann Deutschert (1850, f. 90-93); Julius Deutschert, Krotoschin (1850-1851, f. 94-98); Abraham Kempner, Kempen (1851-1857, f. 99-110); Ephraim L. Jelenkiewicz, Glatz (1852-1853, f. 111-133); Samuel Rosenthal, Breslau (1853, f. 134-138); widow (B.) of Samuel Goldstücker, and new husband N. Wiener, Festenberg (1853-1855, f. 139-154); Salomon Goldmann, Schrimm (1854-1855, f. 155-158); Isidor Liebes, Gnesen (1854-1855, f. 159-163, 190); Mates/Mathias Lewi, Gnesen (1854-1856, f. 164-180, 190); Bernhard Löwenstein, Gnesen (1854-1855, 1860; f. 181-192); Jacob Wollheim, Birnbaum (1854-1857, f. 193-200); Albert Fuchs, Breslau (1856, F. 201-203); Isidor Tuchmann, Breslau (1856, f. 204-205); Moses Guttmann, Adelnau (1855, f. 206-207); Salomon Marcus, Pleschen (1855-1856, f. 208-215); Joseph Marcus, Grabow (1856, f. 216-220); Meier/Meyer Grabowski (1856, f. 221-224); and Wolf Zellner, Breslau (1855-1856, f. 225-229). Leaves of the volume are numbered, in red or plain pencil, 1 to 229.

 
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3 18 Das Aufgebot der israelitischen Heiraten (Litt. A., No. 6, Vol. I)
Marriage banns for Jewish marriages
1834-1839
  

Correspondence with the government, including directives about publication of marriage banns (to take place in the synagogue on three consecutive Sabbaths); petitions concerning permission to marry, publication of banns, or objections to a marriage; attestations by acquaintances on behalf of petitioners seeking to marry; and communal minutes/decisions. One case concerns a question over the validity of the marriage of Hirsch Krauskopf, with consultation of Rabbi Mannheim Auerbach (f. 63-64, 114). Petitioners include (in order of first occurrence): Heimann Hirsch (of Sieroszewice), cantor Jacob Baer, Loebel Bockmann, Joseph Korn, Dache/Deiche Lachs, Herrman Löwi/Lewy, Itzig Jacob Löwy, Joseph Zellner, Fabisch Bendusch, Moritz Kleczewski, Itzig Nossen, Herrman Basch, Markus Kluge, Abraham Mendel, Jacob Fuchs, Moritz Silz, Marcus Kozminski, Moses Angelski, Moritz Pilz, Itzig Storchnest, Abraham Pulvermann, Abraham Weiss, Itzig Brand, Mannes Werner, David Weiss, Aron Berliner, Isaac Callomon, Moses Anhalt, Simon Blaszker, David Weiss, Lazarus Callomon, Loebel Joseph Michael, Israel Krah, Julius Leser, Samuel Raszkower, A. Müller, Samuel Wollheim, Louis Zellner, Rabbi Mannheim Auerbach, Meier/Mayer Brockmann, Rechel Thau, Israel Grund, B. Berliner, Boas Fraenkel, Nathan Peiser, and Herrmann Gins. Some of the petitioners are grooms-to-be; one (Thau) is a bride-to-be; and the others are men bringing forth a matter pertaining to a son, daughter, or sister. Leaves of the volume are numbered, in red pencil, 1 to 118. Some signatures in Yiddish.

 
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3 19 Weddings in the Jewish community of Ostrowo in the period 1836 to 1845
circa 1836-1845
  

List in a table spanning two facing pages, including: name of groom and bride; place name and dates, evidently pertaining to the publication of the marriage banns; date of ceremony; profession of groom; whether it is the first marriage or a subsequent one; the ages of the groom and bride; the names of the parents on both sides; and residence of the parents. The date the wedding was entered into the registry, with names of witnesses, is written on a lower line, across the columns. The list contains a total of 143 entries, as follows: 14 in 1836; 8 in 1837; 23 in 1838; 19 in 1839; 14 in 1840; 14 in 1841; 13 in 1842; 8 in 1843; 20 in 1844; and 10 in 1845. Incomplete, missing the first leaf, which would have contained some of the data for the first six entries, in the first half of 1836, including the names of the brides and grooms; the first extant leaf contains some of the information on those weddings, including the names of the parents, and the date the wedding was entered in the registry. Gatherings bound together, lacking covers.

 
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3 20 Ehescheidungs-Liste der israelitischen Gemeinde zu Ostrowo pro 1846 (Duplicat)
List of divorces in the Jewish community of Ostrowo for 1846 (duplicate)
1846
  

Consists of 2 numbered leaves, the first bearing an attestation of the Prussian government, county Adelnau, indicating that the list consists of two leaves, and the second blank (perhaps formally attesting that there were no divorces to be listed). Booklet with cardboard cover, bound with string; found laid in the previous volume (Folder 19).

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
4 21 Die Verzeichnisse der männlichen Geburten (Fach 7, No. 7)
Lists of male Jewish births
1859-1874
  

Correspondence with the government, 1859-1860; and official compilations concerning male Jewish births registered at the Adelnau district, or county court (Kreisgericht) in Ostrowo, provided by that office, covering the years 1847 to 1874. The county (Kreis) of Adelnau included the towns of Adelnau, Ostrowo, Raszkow, and Sulmierzyce. The data includes name of child, date of birth, names of parents, maiden name of mother, profession of head of household, and place of residence. The first list comprises verbatim transcriptions of the registry entries; the others display the information in the form of a chart. Includes the following compilations: male Jewish births from 1847 to 1850, containing 179 entries (1859); male Jewish births from 1851 to September 1859, containing 419 entries (1859); and male Jewish births by quarter in the period from the fourth quarter 1859 to the second quarter of 1874. The quarterly reports, which are dated within a week or two from the end of the quarter, are complete through the end of 1866, and incomplete after that, with the following quarters unaccounted for: 1st of 1866; 4th of 1868; 2nd and 4th of 1869; 1st, 2nd and 4th of 1870; 4th of 1871; 2nd and 4th of 1872; 2nd and 4th of 1873; and 1st of 1874. The first and second quarters in 1864 are combined in a single list.

 
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4 22 Die Abschliessung von Verträgen über den Verkauf der Synagogen-Sitzstellen (Fach 8, No. 2a)
Executed contracts for the sale of synagogue seats (1 of 2)
1858-1860, 1864
  

Collection of individual contracts for synagogue seats, issued before notary public Ferdinand Gembitzky, Ostrowo. The seats pertain to the new synagogue that was completed in 1860. The contracts, typically for one men's and one women's seat, were mostly executed in August to December 1858, occasionally with addenda dated 1859-1860. Each is signed by two officers of the community, and two additional members serving as witnesses. The professions of all the signatories are included. The officers who appear are Jacob Guttmann, Moses Berliner, Moritz Wehlau, and Moritz Pulvermann. Following are the contract holders, in order of occurrence (with contracts dated 1858, unless otherwise noted): Marcus Mannheim, Cohn Baum, Ephraim Raphael Hoff, Aron Berliner, Mannheim Wiener, Moses Hoff (1864 resale: Elias Josefowitz), Moritz Pilz, Marcus Lissner, Moritz Pulvermann, Jacob Krotoschyner (1860), Salomon Hoff (1859), Jacob Fuchs, Mendel Landau, Boas Fraenkel (1859 resale: Moritz Trieber), Mendel Teichmann, Moritz Bielski, Julius Gross, Heymann Krauskopf, Isidor Krotoszyner, Albert Krotosziner, Moritz Lewkowitz, Jacob Guttmann, Lazarus Callomon (1859), Heimann Cohn (2 items), Loebel Landé, Isidor Berliner, Moritz Liebes (1859), Mathes Josephi, Bertha Teichmann, Bendit Hoffmann, Herrman Liebes (1859), Nathan Peiser (1859), Mendel Casriel Lewy, Benjamin Gallewski, Herrmann Silber, Salomon Moskiewicz, Salomon Hartmann, Jacob Littwitz, Samuel Peiser (1859), Jacob Moskiewicz, Moses Kaliski (1859), Moritz Landé, Moses Pfeffermann, Zacharias Korn, Mendel Pulvermann, Loebel Cohn, Salomon Gross, Robert Cohn, and Heimann Grabowski.

 
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4 23 Die Abschliessung von Verträgen über den Verkauf der Synagogen-Sitzstellen (Fach 8, No. 2b)
Executed contracts for the sale of synagogue seats (2 of 2)
1858-1866
  

Continuation of the series of documents contained in Folder 22: Collection of individual contracts for synagogue seats, issued before notary public Ferdinand Gembitzky, Ostrowo. Community officers who appear are Jacob Guttmann, Moses Berliner, Moritz Pulvermann, Moritz Wehlau, and Sina (Sinai) Holzmann. Following are the contract holders, in order of occurrence (with contracts dated 1858, unless otherwise noted): Loebel Pulvermann, Sina Holzmann, Michael Fuchs, Salim Gerstmann, Pincus Seidel, Aron Stillschweig (1859), Herrmann Schildberger, Hirsch Callomon, Salomon Loebel Krotoschiner, Aron Mueller, Joachim Liebes, Jacob Wehlau, Moritz Wehlau, Moses Apt, Samuel Grund, Heymann Cohn, Mannheim Marcus, Boas Fraenkel, Simon Berliner, Moses Berliner, Salomon Peiser (1859), Abraham Cohn, Salomon Schlomm (1859), Meyer Simon, Sinai Gross, Mannheim Wiener, Jacob Radt, Samuel Weissbein, Jacob Stahl (1865 resale: Abraham Glaser; note dated 1866), Loebel Seidenberg, Malke Katz, Lazarus Cohn, Abraham Brandt, Meyer Golliner, Israel Jacob (1859), Hirsch Simon (1859), Gerson Herbst, Eisig Ledermann, Aron Michael (1859), Loebel, Loewenstein, Israel Horwitz, Moritz Burgheim (1860, without the notary), Moses Spiro, David L. Dickkopf (contract dated 1863, without notary, for sale of previously purchased seats to Jacob Müller), Herrmann Jacobsohn (1863), and M. Ehrlich (1863).

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
5 24 Contract for sale of synagogue seats: M. Cohn Baum payments
1857-1868
  

Loose documents (2 items). Pertains to the same contract for Cohn Baum that is included in the bound volume in Folder 22, above. The first item, dated July 1857, is a receipt acknowledging a payment he made in the purchase of the two seats. The second item is a copy of the contract (dated September 1858), which is missing the first leaf, and includes, at the end, two leaves of subsequent handwritten notations about payments, dated 1859 to 1868.

 
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5 25 Contracts for sale of synagogue seats: Transfer agreements
1858-1887
  

Loose documents (2 items). One contract related to Simon Berliner; and one contract, with accompanying loose bifolium, related to Bendit Hoffmann. Both contracts were issued before notary public Ferdinand Gembitzky, and bear the same dates, in 1858, and pertain to the same synagogue seats as the corresponding contracts for these two individuals included in the collection of contracts above (in Folders 23 and 22, respectively). In both cases these appear to be working copies, both of them containing several leaves of handwritten notations at the back, concerning payments in the period 1859 to 1866. The contract for Berliner also includes at the back an agreement to transfer the seats to Mannes Ehrlich, with acknowledgment of receipt of payment, dated 1876. The contract for Hoffmann is accompanied by an additional leaf with an agreement (headed: Cession), dated 1876, signed by Moritz Hoffmann, acting on behalf of the heirs of Bendit Hoffmann, regarding the transfer of the seats to Martin Mendelssohn, and acknowledging receipt of payment. The two transfer agreements both bear a note concerning the registering of the transfer in the community archive, dated 1887.

 
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5 26 Auszug aus dem Gemeinde-Sitzstellenarchiv
Excerpt from the community archive of synagogue seat records
1908
  

A list of synagogue seat holders, containing 120 names. Prepared by community secretary Haym. Entries, in columns, including: sequential number, name of seat owner, to whom rented ("Vermietet an"), number of male seat, number of female seat, remarks. Most of the owners hold both a male and a female seat; some hold only one seat.

 
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5 27 Nachweis über Synagogensitzplätze pro 1909/10
Record of synagogue seat rentals for 1909/1910
1909
  

List of synagogue seat holders, with a total of monies paid on the last page, signed by Jacob Krauskopf, chair of the community executive, dated October 1909. Entries in columns, including: number of the synagogue seat, name of the person renting, fixed rate (Taxe), amount paid, remarks. The seats are listed in two sections, for men's and women's seats. Booklet, 8 leaves.

 
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5 28 Nachweis der Synagogenplätze 1913/1914, 1915/1916
Record of synagogue seat rentals for 1913/1914 and 1915/1916
1913, 1915
  

Two booklets (6 and 8 leaves, respectively) containing lists of synagogue seat holders, each with a total of monies paid on the last page. The booklet for 1915/1916 is signed by officers of the community executive, headed by Krauskopf, and dated December 1915; that for 1913/1914 is unsigned. Entries in columns, including: number of the synagogue seat, name of the person renting, fixed rate (Taxe), amount paid, remarks. The seats are listed in two sections, for men's and women's seats. The booklets are loose inside a custom-printed community file cover.

 
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Series III: Employment of rabbis and other personnel, 1836, 1841-1913

Predominantly in German, with some Hebrew, Yiddish, and Latin.
17 folders
Arrangement:

Grouped according to the type of position, with records related to the employment of a community rabbi followed by those pertaining to the position of cantor/shochet and then other synagogue personnel, and, at the end, one file on administrative positions of clerk and treasurer; within each category the arrangement is chronological.

Scope and Content:

The records in this series pertain to the community's hiring of paid personnel, including the community rabbi, from midway through the term of Rabbi Menachem (or Mannheim) Auerbach through the end of the term of Rabbi Samuel Freund, in 1907 (Folders 29-37), with one file pertaining mainly to the assistant rabbis (Rabbinatsassessor; Folder 33) and shochets who fulfilled those responsibilities during the long period between the death of Rabbi Aron Moses Stössel, in June 1861, and the election of Rabbi Israel Meier Freimann as the new community rabbi, in May 1871. Other files pertain to the hiring of cantors, who would serve simultaneously as shochet (Folders 38-39); synagogue assistants, or general communal assistants (Korporations-, or Synagogendiener; Folders 40-42); temporary cantors hired during the High Holidays (Folders 43-44); and secretary or treasurer for the communal administration (Folder 45).

The materials comprise applications for the positions, including a wealth of correspondence and biographical documentation from candidates, such as curricula vitae, educational certifications, and recommendation letters; and internal communal correspondence, minutes, and decisions pertaining to the search process, the stipulations for the particular position, and administrative matters related to the employees' terms of office, such as contracts, salary negotiations, requests and complaints from the employees or from community members, and matters such as work conditions, living quarters, time off, and special compensation or aid.

The largest portion of these records (approximately half) pertain to the position of community rabbi, the selection of whom was arrived at in a process that aimed to assure the consensus of the entire community, with an election commission (made up of the executive body together with other elected community representatives) reviewing applications and agreeing on a short roster of candidates; and a final vote on the selection by all the eligible voters in the community. Besides documenting the selection and terms of office of several of the community's rabbis during the continuous period from 1843 to 1907 (covering part of Rabbi Mannheim's term, and the terms of Rabbis Stössel, Freimann, Plessner, and Freund), these files include many materials pertaining to rabbis whom the community ultimately did not hire (especially in Folders 31-32, covering the period in the 1860s when the rabbi post remained vacant).

BoxFolderTitleDate
5 29 Die Anstellung des Rabbiners Auerbach und Pensionierung der Wittwe desselben/ Acta der Repräsentanten-Versammlung (Fach 3, No. 6/No. 1)
Employment of Rabbi Mannheim Auerbach, and pension for his widow/ Records of the representatives' assembly
1843-1848, 1860-1865
  

Correspondence, petitions, and communal minutes/decisions, mainly concerning the rabbi's contract, his death, and the support of his widow and children. Correspondence and minutes/decisions of the representatives' assembly, 1843-1844, pertain to a revision of Auerbach's terms of compensation, particularly concerning "Rachasch," a fee related to the performance of weddings. Includes five letters of protest by Auerbach, one (July 1843) containing an extract from the original employment agreement of 1823, in the form of an 1843 German translation, by Isaac Callomon. Another item (laid in) is Callomon's translation of Auerbach's employment letter (Anstellungsbrief) of 1823, which the assembly forwarded to the executive in January 1844. An additional petition from Rabbi Auerbach, 1845, is an appeal for a supplemental payment in view of a chronic illness of a son. The remaining items, 1848-1865, pertain mostly to Auerbach's death (on March 19, 1848), and the support of his widow and, later, two of his children. Those items include meeting minutes with copy of an obituary; correspondence with the rabbi's son Rabbi Hirsch Auerbach, about his remaining in town to serve the community during Passover; an appeal from the rabbi's widow, Sara Auerbach; and, after her death, an appeal from one of her sons, Lazarus, on behalf of himself and a sister (January 1864). (Other items pertaining to Lazaraus Auerbach are found in Folder 103.) Also included is a letter to the community in Hebrew from Wolf Alexander, of Wollstein (July 1848); and, in February 1860, a letter from Leiser Auerbach, a son or nephew of the rabbi, concerning a debt the community owed to Auerbach's father-in-law, Joel Halberstadt, of Lissa, dating from 1823, with a copy of that loan agreement (in Yiddish). 38 leaves.

 
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5 30 Die Anstellung eines Rabbiners; Rabbiner Stössel (Fach 3, No. 2)
Employment of a rabbi; Rabbi Aron Moses Stössel
1848-1871
  

Correspondence, communal minutes/decisions, petitions, materials related to rabbi candidates. Items in 1848 pertain to the period prior to the election of Rabbi Stössel, including a petition calling for the employment of the late Rabbi Auerbach's son Hirsch Auerbach (in Yiddish, with a German translation; f. 1-8); a list of community members (276 names; f. 26-31); a letter from Rabbi Michael Sachs, Berlin (f. 15-17), recommending a candidate; and an application letter from Naphtali Caro (f. 18). Three items relate to widow Sara Auerbach (f. 11, 19, 23-25). Among the materials pertaining to Rabbi Stössel are the following items/topics: Election, July 1849 (f. 20-22), including a list of voters; his original contract of August 1849 is filed with later materials (see f. 93-96, 109-110). Compensation issues and the extension of his contract, 1853-1856 (f. 35-108), with community decision, list of voters, May-June 1855. Compensation matters, 1857-1858 (f. 110-166), including a court case pertaining to special fees (Stolgebühren) owed to Stössel for occasions such as weddings. Several items in 1860-1861 concern a dowry for Stössel's daughter (f. 171-178); and several in 1861 concern the question of whether to extend his contract again, including discussion of criteria for future rabbi candidates (f. 171, 179-181). The last part of the volume (f. 182 to the end) mostly concerns the death of Stössel in 1861 (f. 182), the subsequent support of his widow and daughter, including letters from his widow (f. 198 on), and his son Moritz Stössel of Brünn (f. 183-184 on). In 1861-1862 are applications from rabbis Jakob Auerbach (son of Rabbi Mannheim Auerbach; f. 194, 202-203); and Marcus/Max Landsberg, Posen (f. 205-210, 226), with enclosures, including Landsberg's dissertation (De Leibnitzii ...). Leaves of the volume are numbered in red pencil 1-210, 226-230, followed by 10 unnumbered items at back. In German with some Yiddish, Hebrew, and Latin.

 
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5 31 Die Anstellung des Rabbiners (Fach 3, No. 3)
Employment of the rabbi
1864-1868
  

Excerpt from the rules (Reglement) governing the hiring of paid communal officials; list of election officials; correspondence with rabbi candidates (application letters, curricula vitae, recommendation letters); communal announcements and minutes/decisions; and list of eligible voters, and voting tally, November 1865. Rabbi Duschak is elected; however, he is not hired and the post is kept vacant. Applicants represented (in order of first occurrence): Klein, Gross Strehlitz (b. Flatow, 1823); Hermann Grünfeld, Berlin (b. Nikolsburg, Moravia); Abraham Nager, Leipzig; Simon Alexander, Pless (b. 1810, Grätz); Simon Sachs, Berlin (b. Glogau); Moses Braunschweiger, Würzburg; Hermann Wassertrilling, Kreuzburg (Kluczbork); Heimann Jaffé, Kurnik (b. Rawicz); Heimann Cohn, Flatow (son of the rabbi of Gollub); David Weiss, Vienna (b. Misslitz, Moravia); Adolf Salwendi, Berent near Danzig; Salomon Brann, Schneidermühl (b. 1814, Rawicz); M. J. Königshöfer, Munich (later writes from Ermreuth); Lasar Latzar, Meisenheim (b. Galicia region); Joseph Perles, Posen (letter declining to apply); J. B. Lehmans, Nimwegen (Nijmegen), Netherlands (b. 1838); Daniel Fraenkel, Rybnik; Moses Abraham Wreschner, Lublinitz; Marcus Landsberg, Posen (b. 1826, Santomysl); Aron Kroner, Oels; Aron Cassel, Schwerin an de Warthe; P. Buchholz, Märkisch-Friedland; Bernhard Friedmann, Nakel (community decision); Salomon Reimann, Neuenburg; Bernhard Fischer, Leipzig (from Bohemia); Moritz Stössel, Brünn, Moravia; Israel Meir Freimann, Filehne; Jacob Horowitz, Breslau (b. Cracow); Moritz Duschak, Gaya, Moravia; H. Samter, Miloslaw (son of rabbi of Chodziesen); Max Lamberg, Misslitz; M. G. Alifeld, Pasewalk; M. L. Kohn, Piesling, Moravia. In German with some Hebrew.

 
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5 32 Die Anstellung des Rabbiners (Fach 3, No. 4)
Employment of the rabbi
1869-1871
  

List of rabbi applicants (with birthplace, place of studies, and brief notes), 1870; communal announcements and minutes/decisions; petition urging the employment of a rabbi, 1869; correspondence with rabbi applicants (application letters, curricula vitae, recommendation letters); documentation of election meeting, with list of eligible voters, April 1870; and correspondence with the government. In the 1870 election Rabbi Raphael is chosen by a bare majority; after a protest from some community members about the procedure, the election is declared invalid. The community then appeals to Rabbi Freimann, an earlier candidate, to apply again; Freimann is ultimately elected in May 1871 (correspondence refers to the result but the 1871 election is not documented in the current file). Applicants represented (in order of first occurrence): Samuel Spitzer, Essek, Slavonia; Hermann Grünfeld, Tuchel; Hermann Wassertrilling, Militsch; Leopold Samter, Grünberg; Raphael Goldberg, Rawicz (b. Papa, Hungary; includes diploma in Latin, 23 x 18-1/2"); Salomon Stiebel, Schrimm (b. 1840, Mainstockheim); Abraham Nager, Polnisch Crone (b. 1833, Oświęcim); Max Friedländer, Kanitz, Moravia; Joel Müller, Böhmisch Leipa; Moses Braunschweiger, Würzburg; Samuel Hahn, Damboritz, Moravia; Mendel Levin, Schwetz; Aron Kroner, Oels; Heimann Cohn, Flatow; Jacob Mühlfelder, Breslau (b. 1844, Bauerbach); Israel Lewy, Krotoschin; Samuel Michaelis, Cöthin (b. 1838); H. Heinemann, Hamburg (b. Wildeshausen); Hosea Jacobi, Agram (Zagreb, Croatia; b. Jacobshagen); Emil Hoff, Prague; Nathan Glaser, Breslau (b. 1838, Nikolsburg, Moravia); Adolf Sidon, Tyrnau, Hungary; Philipp Raphael, Brandenburg; Hermann Handl, Pasewalk; Ignaz Grossmann, Warasdin, Croatia; Israel Freimann, Filehne. In German with some Hebrew and Latin.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
6 33 Die Anstellung und Dienstführung der Rabbinats-Assessoren und Schächter (Fach 3, No. 5)
Employment and performance in service of assistant rabbis and shochets (ritual slaughterers)
1860-1874
  

Communal announcements and minutes/decisions; petitions; and correspondence with applicants/employees, government officials and others. Topics include salary, conditions, functions. Candidates and correspondents represented (in order of first occurrence; writing from Ostrowo, unless otherwise noted): H. Wolfsohn, Raszkow; Nathan Holzmann, M. Apt, and Samuel Fraenkel (all Rabbinatsassessor); Israel Horwitz; Moses Ungar, Raszkow (Rabbinats-Assessor and Schächter, September 1865 to April 1870); Simon Sternberg (Fleischermeister); Joseph Bauer (Cantor); Salomon Winter, Schwedt (Cantor); Leyser Lasker (Schächter); Heinrich Sonnenberg (Fleischermeister); Joseph Messing (Rabbiner), Czempin; Salomon Brandt (Lehrer); Jacob Littwitz (Fleischermeister); Hirsch Weinbaum (Schlächter); S. M. Bloch (Rabbiner), Jarocin; Mathias Weissblum, Adelnau (Schächter/Vorbeter); Jacob Stern, Raszkow; Rubin Rosinau, Gostyn; Isaak Oscher, Pitschen; L. Goldkraut, Zduny; and Jacob Basch, head of the Jewish community in Buk. The leaves in approximately the first half of the volume are numbered, in blue pencil, 1-99. In German with some Hebrew and Yiddish.

 
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6 34 Die Wahl, Anstellung und Amtsführung des Rabbiners Dr. Freimann (Fach 3, No. 7)
Election, employment and performance in office of Rabbi Dr. Israel Meir Freimann
1871-1885
  

Communal announcements and minutes/decisions; documentation of election meeting on May 21, 1871, with list of eligible voters (228 names) and their votes, resulting in the unanimous election of Rabbi Freimann; Freimann's curriculum vitae; and correspondence with Freimann and with the government. Other topics include the inauguration ceremony, June 1871; Freimann's contract, for a 12-year term, June 1871; his apartment; raises, 1874-1875, 1883; his death, in August 1884; support of his widow and children; and the erection of a monument for his grave, 1884-1885, commissioned from sculptor J. Nachschön (with diagram and Hebrew inscription). In German with some Hebrew.

 
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6 35 Support for Helene Freimann, widow of Rabbi Freimann
1902
  

Loose documents (6 items). Communal minutes/decisions concerning aid to Helene Freimann (née Ettlinger; widow of the community's former rabbi Israel Meier Freimann), during her illness, and, after her death, payment for her gravestone. Includes a letter of thanks from the rabbi's son, Aron Freimann.

 
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6 36 Die Wahl und Anstellung eines Rabbiners; Dr. Plessner (Fach 3, No. 8)
Election and employment of a rabbi; Rabbi Dr. Elias Plessner
1885-1898
  

Communal announcements and minutes/decisions; correspondence with rabbi applicants (letters of application, recommendation letters); list of eligible voters to select election delegates, May/June 1885 (220 names); list of rabbi applicants (with birthplace, age, family, place of studies, and brief notes), circa October 1885; correspondence with Rabbi Plessner and with the government; Rabbi Plessner's contract (dated November 1885, for a six-year term) and renewals (1892, 1894, and 1897, for two-, three-, and one-year terms, respectively); items related to his death, in March 1898 (numerous condolence letters and telegrams, a newspaper clipping of an obituary in Der Israelit), and a pension for his widow, Johanna Plessner; a petition from community members in favor of immediate action to fill the vacant rabbi position, April 1898; and items concerning the ceremony for the laying of a gravestone, December 1898. The election results, unanimous for Rabbi Plessner, of Rogasen, except for one vote, are reported on September 29, 1885. Other applicants represented with correspondence: Simon Friedmann, Lublinitz; Siegmund Fessler, Mannheim; Joseph Spitz, Haigerloch; Jakob Bassfreund, Tarnowitz; Salomon Richter, Filehne; Salomon Stiebel, Strasburg (Brodnica); Marcus Dienstfertig, Cottbus; Heinrich Ehrentreu, Prague; and Bernhard Baer, Graudenz. Includes an issue of the county newspaper Kreis Blatt für den Kreis Adelnau (4 leaves), June 1885, containing the announcement of community elections to select the delegates of the rabbi election commission.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
7 37 Wahl eines Rabbiners, Anstellung des Rabbiners Dr. Freund (Fach 3, No. 9)
Election of a rabbi; employment of Rabbi Dr. Samuel Freund
1898-1907
  

Communal announcements and minutes/decisions; newspaper announcements concerning the rabbi position; list of eligible voters (154 names), June 1898; correspondence with applicants (letters of application, recommendation letters); curriculum vitae, diploma (in Latin, 23-1/2 x 18"), and educational certifications of Samuel Freund, Czarnikau; election tally, September 1898, electing Freund; and correspondence with the government. Other materials concern Freund's contract (November 1898, for a six-year term); his induction into office; renovation of his apartment; his marriage, in November 1900, to Minna Feilchenfeld; the association of rabbis in Germany (Rabbiner-Verband, printed flier, 1901); extension of contract with raise, 1904; and Freund's resignation, in 1907, in order to take a position in Hannover. A few items concern the engagement of rabbis for temporary duties in 1898. Rabbi applicants represented (in order of first occurrence): Hermann Kluger, Breslau; Louis Lewin, Pinne; Victor Nordheimer, Schwetz; Heinrich Krantz, Schönlanke; Josef Zolinsky, Kolmar in Posen; Ludwig Pick, Strasburg (Brodnica); M. L. Bamberger, Schildberg; Salomon Richter, Filehne; Simon Friedmann, Lublinitz; Julius Lewit, Stolp; Simon Eppenstein, Briesen; Salomon Chodowski, Oels; Julius Theodor, Bojanowo; Moritz Silberberg, Grätz; Daniel Fink, Vienna; Moriz Kohn, Frankfurt am Main (b. 1871); Josephson, Lauenburg (b. 1863, Lautenburg). A printed flier pertaining to the induction of Rabbi Freund into office, December 1898, bears penciled revisions pertaining to the 1908 induction of Rabbi Neuhaus. In German with some Hebrew, and one item in Latin.

 
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7 38 Die Anstellung eines Kantor und Schächter; Haft (Fach 4, No. 3)
Employment of a cantor and shochet (ritual slaughterer); Cantor Pinchas Haft
1860-1865
  

Newspaper ads (1860) for position of cantor/shochet qualified to introduce choral singing; communal announcements, minutes/decisions; correspondence with applicants (letters of application, recommendations), and with the government; petitions; and lists of eligible voters. Topics include: hiring of cantor Haft, September 1861; complaint from a group of community members about his employment (resolved January 1862); election August 1862 (not completed due to a petition in opposition to the proceedings); extensions of Haft's contract by action of council; election scheduled for July 1863 (not held); the community's financial situation in view of costs of the new synagogue and the hiring of a musically educated cantor (August 1861); negotiation of Haft's duties as shochet; renovation of his apartment; the introduction of choral singing in the synagogue under Haft's direction (December 1861); clothing and compensation for choir boys; the hiring of an assistant or second shochet (1862, 1865). Petitioners in 1861-1863 include communal employees M. B. Lissner, Leiser/Leyser Lasker, M. Apt, and Hermann Prager; and in 1865, Moses Ungar. Cantor applicants represented in 1861: L. Lewinstein, Lublinitz; M. Silberstein, Inowroclaw (1863: Zülz); Jacob Feder, Zirke (later: Pudewitz); S. Mosche/Moses, Breslau; M. Elkan, Thorn; Israel Goldstein, Samter; Wolff Moll, Neustadt bei Pinne (1863: Schwedt); J. Messing, Gostyn; Simon Schlesinger, Reichenbach in Silesia; Pulvermacher, Schönlanke; Goldstein, Konitz; Joel Struck, Fraustadt; Adolf Pollak, Oppeln (in 1863: Culmsee); Moses Michael Slonimski, Sieradz; M. Pruzan, Włocławek. In 1863: Bernhard Warschauer, Breslau; M. Bornstein, Canth; Philipp Bernstein, Lobsens; M. Moses, Rybnik; Josef Bauer, Posen; Abraham Galle, Dobrzyca. Applicants for shochet include Joseph Pior (hired 1862) and R. Ehrlich. Several documents at the back of the volume are fragmentary. In German with some Hebrew.

 
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7 39 Die Wahl und Anstellung der Kantoren und Schächter (Fach 4, No. 12)
Election and employment of cantors and shochets
1883-1889
  

Lists of applicants for the positions of cantor and shochet; communal announcements and minutes/decisions; correspondence with applicants (letters of applications, curricula vitae, recommendations), the government, and Rabbi Plessner; list of eligible voters (f. 17-18; 228 names); and newspaper announcement (Amtsblatt for Adelnau county) of the election of election commission delegates (January 1885). The earliest items concern the election of cantor Moritz Stössel, of Hungary, in late 1883; government approval for him to serve until August 1884; and a government order (f. 7, 10) that Stössel, as well as the shochet Hirsch Eisenstein, of Bolesławiec, because of their status as foreigners, must be let go by April 1885. Further topics include: severance pay and departure of cantor Stössel; test presentations (Probevorträge) by candidates; election of Fabian Senior, of Dirschau, as cantor (f. 110), and his contract (June 1886, f. 134-141); in 1888-1889, the expiration of the contracts of shochet M. Gillis and cantor Fabian, the opening of a vacancy for new cantor/shochet positions under different terms, and the re-hiring of Gillis and Fabian. Other applicants represented: S. L. Ehrlich, Hamburg; Louis Rosenbaum, Schwerin; A. Wohlkühn, Tilsit; Moses Finkelstein, Schroda; M. L. Cohn, Gnesen; David Baumstein, Quedlinburg; F. Nischkowsky, Rastenburg; A. Heilpern, Birnbaum; and J./F. Bloch, Bentschen. Applicants in 1889: Julius Wolf, Neutomischel; and H. Davidsohn, Beuthen. Leaves are numbered, in blue pencil, up to 141, followed by some 50 unnumbered leaves at back. In German with some Hebrew.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
8 40 Anstellung und Dienstführung der Korporations- und Synagogendiener (Fach 5, No. 3)
Employment and performance in service of community and synagogue attendants
1836, 1841-1876, 1887-1894
  

Communal minutes/decisions; petitions/correspondence with applicants/employees (community attendant; synagogue attendant, or shammes); complaints by community members against attendants; summary of duties of synagogue attendants (f. 50-51, 109); and correspondence with the government. General topics are salary as well as raises, advances, supplemental/bonus payments (Gratifikation); duties; and time off. Specific topics include: election of Lippmann Zuckermann as shammes, 1841 (f. 9-12); the investigation of complaints about Joseph Kraus's mishandling of funds in 1847 (f. 40-43); and suspension of Zuckermann from his position (f. 121), as well as his complaint submitted to the government, 1868, and his severance pay, 1869-1870. One community decision concerns the recognition of the synagogue attendant as a religious official (Kultusbeamte), April 1870. Other applicants/employees represented through 1869: Israel Klapper, Josef Wolf Tisch, Leib Josel, and Adolph Hartmann; after 1869: Kalliman Berlinger, L. Fabisch, Leyser Lasker, Jacob Werner, Salomon Brandt (contract, January 1871; retirement, 1887), S. Soberski (served 1887-1891), M. Bärnkopf, and Jacob Jacob (hired 1891). The leaves in approximately the first half of the volume are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 118.

 
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8 41 Employment and performance in service of community and synagogue attendants 1902, 1906-1907
  

Loose documents (5 items), found laid in the previous volume (Folder 40). Communal minutes/decisions; petitions/correspondence with community/synagogue attendant. Topics include: additional payment to attendant Jacob Jacob due to severity of the winter, and decision to honor him upon his 70th birthday, 1902; compensation to Elias Lamm for taking over Jacob's duties during the latter's illness, 1906; decision to honor Jacob upon his 75th birthday, 1907; and raise for attendant Lamm upon his continued performance of Jacob's duties, 1907.

 
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8 42 Die Neubesetzung der vakanten Synagogendienerstelle; Schmuckler (Fach 5, No. 7)
Employment of a synagogue attendant; Simon Schmuckler
1908-1909, 1913
  

Communal minutes/decisions; meeting notices; correspondence with applicants, including applicant letters and recommendation letters, or copies. Minutes of August 1908 refer to the death of the former attendant, Jacob Jacob; and describe the position to be filled as a synagogue attendant who would also be an assistant shochet. Topics include the hiring of Simon Schmuckler, Borck (b. 1857, Jarotschin), in November 1908; matters related to his apartment; and investigation of two complaints against him, 1908, 1909. Other applicants represented: Sigmund March, Gnezda, Hungary; Leopold Seliger, Darmstadt; J. Warschawsky, Krotoschin; Joseph Blacher, Memel; Joseph Gabow, Düsseldorf; A. Gronemann, Aumund near Vegesack (Bremen); Abraham Margoliner, Gnesen; Jakob Rothschild, Glatz; N. Königshöfer, Hamburg; Elias Lamm, Ostrowo; and J. L. Fränkel, Weisskirchen. In German with some Hebrew.

 
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8 43 Applications for position of assistant cantor (Hilfsvorbeter) for the High Holidays
1905
  

Loose documents (28 items). Responses to a newspaper advertisement for the position, without any evidence of the community's actions. The letters, or cards, all dated in early September, are from the following 28 applicants: D. Wospe, Bischofstein/Rössel; F. Beutler, Bentschen; Arnold Boelmann, Tost; S. Engelmann, Breslau; L. Fleischhacker, Breslau; Baruch Friedner, Cologne (Cöln); Israel Gescheidt, Berlin; D. Goldschmidt, Schönlanke; Willy Gross, Berlin; Josef Hes, Emden, student in Cologne; Moritz Hosner, Nuremberg; Georg Jospe, Miloslaw; J. Klapper, Slupen (written mostly in Hebrew); J. Klapper, Slupen; M. Klein, Nagy-Szombat, Hungary; L. Lewin, formerly cantor in Jutroschin; S. Leyser, Berlin; F. Liebermann, Schöneck [?]; M. Mintz, Königsberg; H. Ram, Leipzig; Rothotz, Berlin; J. Rubinfeld, Berlin-Charlottenburg; K. Springer, Rogowo and Berlin (two postcards); N. Strauchen, Cracow; F. N. Wegner, Wronke; N. Weinberg, Jr., Hamburg; Calmann Weiss, Burghaun near Fulda; and Abraham Weissmann, Berlin. The letters of Fleischhacker, Friedner, and Hess include copies of recommendations, and that of Jospe is accompanied by a letter from his father, H. Jospe, cantor of Miroslaw; the others are without supporting materials.

 
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8 44 Die Annahme eines Hilfsvorbeters zu den Hohen Festtagen (Fach 5, No. 5, Vol. II)
Employment of an assistant cantor for the High Holidays
1907-1908
  

Application and recommendation letters, communal minutes/decisions, and correspondence. Most of the materials pertain to Samuel Schmulewicz, Leipzig, in 1907-1908, including correspondence with the Jewish community of Posen, where Schmulewicz had recently served as assistent cantor for the congregation of the Neue Betschule, the executive of which sends a recommendation. The remaining items include: a letter exchange with J. Budnik of Warsaw, 1907, who had served during the High Holidays in Ostrowo the previous year; and a postcard and copy of references (laid in), 1907, for Moritz Goldstein, of Aschaffenburg. 18 leaves.

 
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8 45 Die Anstellung und Dienstführung des Korporations-Schreibers und Rendanten (Fach 5, No. 12)
Employment and performance in service of the community clerk and treasurer
1841-1847, 1855-1874, 1879-1892, 1902
  

Communal minutes/decisions; petitions from and correspondence with applicants and employees; correspondence with the government; and contracts. Includes contracts for Moritz Isidor Löwenstein as secretary, 1843, 1845; Moritz Burgheim as clerk, 1847; and Salo Josephi as treasurer, 1890. Topics include: Löwenstein's departure and severance pay, 1847, and (after he was re-hired in 1858) raises, advances, and supplementary payments, 1859-1867; chair Spiro's critical evaluation of Löwenstein's peformance, and latter's firing and severance, 1867; treasurer (Rendant) David Goldstein's assumption of additional duties as secretary, 1867; supplementary payment to Goldstein, 1870, and raises, 1872-1873, and vacation leave, 1874; Moritz Berliner's election as treasurer, 1880; security deposit to be paid by community treasurer, 1889; Salo Josephi's election as treasurer, 1890; and salary for treasurer Fabisch, 1902 (laid in). Other applicants/employees represented: A. Weisstein, 1842; Dr. Piorkowsky, 1855, 1858; M. Bärnkopf, 1879; Adolph Tuch, 1881, 1892; and J. Chaym, 1887, 1891-1892.

 
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Series IV: Charitable aid and voluntary associations, 1834-1919

Predominantly in German, with some Yiddish, and occasional use of Hebrew.
22 folders
Arrangement:

Records related to communal charitable aid are followed by seven files at the end of the subseries pertaining to specific voluntary associations; within each grouping the arrangement is roughly chronological.

Scope and Content:

This series contains communal records related to charitable aid (Folders 46-60), and also includes, at the end, records kept by several voluntary associations in the community that had charitable missions (Folders 61-70).

The voluntary associations represented are: the Frauen-Verein zur Unterstützung dürftiger Frauen und Jungfrauen (Women's association for the support of poor women and girls); the Jugendverein (Youth association) and the Verein zur Heranbildung jüdischer Handwerker zu Ostrowo (Association for the training of Jewish artisans in Ostrowo), both of which supported young men who were completing apprenticeships; the Verein Malbisch Arumim zu Ostrowo (Society "Malbish Arumim" of Ostrowo), which distributed clothes to schoolchildren from poor families; and the Eger-Loge (Eger Lodge) of B'nai B'rith (Unabhängiger Orden Bne Briss, or UOBB).

A few volumes of communal financial records are included here (Folder 56, an account book; and Folders 51-52 and 55, mainly pay orders), since they are devoted exclusively to charitable aid and supplement the executive files. Otherwise these are generally executive files containing petitions from individual community members, and appeals from other Jewish communities, as well as from outside Jewish organizations, along with the communal minutes and decisions pertaining to the requests. A few of the files are notable for the great number of petitions from individual community members, in the periods 1848 to 1858 (Folder 50), and 1867 to 1879 (Folders 53-54). Several files dating from the 1880s to the 1890s (Folders 57-59) contain predominantly appeals from outside of the community.

In the earliest period, through the 1840s, several volumes have a specific focus: one concerns an older private society for the care of the sick and the burial of the dead (Chevra Kadisha) that had existed since around 1825 but became more limited in its mission under the new government regulations (Folder 46); one concerns, in particular, the charitable distribution of flour at Passover time (Folder 48), with inclusion of bilingual communal announcements, in German and Yiddish; and another pertains to the community's supplying of clothing to poor children so that they could attend school (Folder 49).

From around the 1860s the community elected a special commission to administer charitable aid, and materials concerning bylaws and elections of the commission are included (Folders 53-54). There are a few materials reflecting activities during the First World War (Folders 57 and 60).

BoxFolderTitleDate
8 46 Der Verein zur Pflege der Kranken und Beerdigung der Leichen/ Acta der Repräsentanten-Versammlung (Fach 6, No. 2)
Society for the care of the sick and the burial of the dead/ Records of the representatives' assembly
1835-1838, 1841
  

Correspondence with the government; meeting notices and decisions of the representatives' assembly; and correspondence between the executive and the assembly. Mostly pertains to a private association for care of the sick and burial of the dead (Chevra Kadisha), headed by Baruch Bloch and Baruch Krotoszyner; the earliest item, a government letter in May 1835, indicates that the private association would no longer be allowed to attend to burial matters, since regulations required that these be administered by the community council. Among other items: a letter from Bloch and Krotoszyner, July 1835, responding to the new rules, accompanied by a copy of a resolution, May 1835, signed by 24 members who were resigning; and items in 1837-1838 settling a concern about the according of funds collected during prayers and at burials to the private association. A document in July 1835 gives death statistics for the community for 1832 to 1834. The single item in 1841 is a copy of a contract between the community (represented by Jacob Wehlau and Aron Berliner) and physician Koschny, for the latter's treatment of sick members of the poorer class, and examination of corpses.

 
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8 47 Die Armenunterstützung (Fach 18/ Litt. A, No. 3, Vol. 1)
Poor relief
1834-1839
  

Petitions for aid, communal minutes/decisions, pay orders, and correspondence with the government. Includes petitions from approximately 40 Ostrowo community members. Two letters are from the Potsdam Jewish community (Goldfaenger), concerning Heinrich Tisch of Ostrowo. One petitioner, Moses Jacob, writes from Jerusalem. Leaves are numbered 1 to 110, in red pencil. In German with one item in Yiddish and some Yiddish signatures.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
9 48 Die Verabreichung des Ostermehls an Arme (Fach 17, No. 1, Vol. II)
Distribution of Passover flour to the poor
1835-1845
  

Communal minutes/decisions, annual lists of recipients, regulations for suppliers of Passover flour (Bedingungen zur Verpachtung des Ostermehls; Bedingungen der Ostermehllieferung), petitions, correspondence, and communal announcements. Concerns Passover flour distributed under the umbrella of the charitable aid fund (Armen-Unterstützungsfond). Topics include evaluation of candidates for supplying the flour, with correspondence from Marcus Zellner; Daniel Hoppe; Carl Schulz/Scholz; Johan Dymuk; and Glissmann and Grell of Oels. Includes petitions from approximately 40 Ostrowo community members. Many of the announcements are bilingual, in German and Yiddish. The leaves in approximately the first half of the volume are numbered, in red pencil, 1 to 101. In German and Yiddish, including Yiddish signatures.

 
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9 49 Die Bekleidung armer Schulkinder (Fach 18, No. 2)
Provision of clothing for poor schoolchildren
1834, 1842-1846, 1865
  

Correspondence with the government and the school executive (Schulvorstand); communal minutes/decisions concerning purchases of clothing for poor children; register of children in need of winter clothing (with parent's name, child's name and age), 1834; petitions, or appeals recorded in minutes; and invoices/receipts. The earliest item is a letter from Ostrowo mayor Oehlers concerning a poor child, son of Salomon Salzmann, sent home from school for insufficient clothes. Includes petitions/appeals from Joseph Salzmann and Ester Weiss, in 1834, concerning their respective sons; teacher Piorkowski, in 1846, concerning several students who missed school due to lack of clothing; and cantor Josef Bauer, 1865, concerning choir boy Leopold Posner, in need of suitable clothes for confirmation. In German with one receipt in Yiddish.

 
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9 50 Die Unterstützung der Armen (Fach 16, No. 2, Vol. II)
Poor relief
1848-1858
  

Annual summary of aid to the poor for year 1847, with list of recipients and amounts by month; various monthly lists, 1848-1849; correspondence with the government, including petition to Posen, May 1848; petitions from individuals and communities/organizations; communal minutes/decisions; account of expenses pertaining to the burial of Kaskel Marcus of Krotoschin, 1852; and pay orders and receipts. Includes petitions from over 40 Ostrowo community members. The following Jewish communities are represented with printed appeals: Buk, June 1848 (pogrom on May 4); Loslau, July 1848 (hunger and typhus in last two years); Nakel, on behalf of neighboring city Mroczen/Mrocza (cholera outbreak), October 1848; and Horstmar, 1853 (for building a synagogue). One item is an annual report, 1853, for Jüdische Badearmen-Kasse, Warmbrunn, for supporting the poor at health resorts. In German, with occasional use of Yiddish.

 
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9 51 Beläge der Ausgaben
Supporting documents for expenses
1862
  

Pay orders, petitions for aid, and community minutes/decisions. Comprises supporting documents numbered 1 to 77, for expenditures from charitable aid funds (Armenkasse). Pay orders are typically signed by Moritz Wehlau, authorizing amounts for specific individuals. Also includes petitions from the following individuals: Meier Markus, Abraham Stahl, Ignatz Weitzen, Liebe Fischer, Moses Schildberger, and Emilie Jasklewicz.

 
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9 52 Ausgabe Beläge der Armen-Casse … für das Jahr 1865
Supporting documents for expenses of the poor fund for the year 1865
1865
  

Pay orders. Comprises supporting documents numbered 1 to 108, for expenditures from charitable aid funds (Armenkasse). The pay orders are mostly signed by Fuchs, chair of the charitable aid commission; occasionally they are in the form of minutes/decisions of the charitable aid commission.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
10 53 Die Armenpflege (Fach 16, No. 4, Vol. IV)
Poor relief
1867-1873, 1877, 1888-1891
  

Petitions for aid, 1867-1873, and a few items in 1888-1891; communal announcements; minutes/decisions of the community council and of the charitable aid commission. Includes petitions from over 70 Ostrowo community members. Communal decisions concern individual cases, as well as procedural matters (especially 1868-1870) and commission elections. Includes a proposal from Moritz Wehlau, January 1868, concerning expansion of charitable activities, and related announcements of a joint meeting of all the charitable associations in the community (six or seven), and of a second meeting pertaining to three of those (Wohltätigkeitsverein, or Chevra Kadischa; Holzverein; and Talmud Thora Verein), February 1868, with consolidated membership list (180 names). Minutes in November 1868 concern the election and induction of a five-member commission for charitable aid (Armen-Commission); in November 1869, the possible employment of regular sick attendants (Krankenwärterinnen); and in October 1877, elections to the aid commission (Armen-Deputation). Among the petitions is a printed flier from the Memel community, January 1870, with cover letter from Rabbi Isaac Rülf, noting the influx of Russian Jews requiring charitable support, and soliciting donations for a sanatorium for their benefit. Several petitions in 1873 concern aid for travel costs of emigration (Reiseunterstützung). The single item in 1891 is a letter from Rabbi Plessner, concerning alms distributed to Russian students, and a rabbi, all traveling through.

 
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10 54 Die Unterstützung der Armen (Fach 16, No. 3, Vol. III)
Poor relief
1856-1857, 1868, 1873-1879, 1883-1884
  

Petitions for aid, 1873 to 1879, and a few items in 1883-1884; communal minutes/decisions; bylaws for commission administering charitable aid; meeting notices and minutes/decisions of the commission for charitable aid, concerning individual cases; pay orders; lists of regular recipients annually, circa 1873-1878; lists for matzot distribution; and communal announcements (matzot distribution, 1875). Includes petitions from over 100 Ostrowo community members. The earliest items pertain to the formation of a special commission to administer the community's charitable aid (later called "Armen-Deputation"), proposed November 1856, with draft bylaws, 1857, 1868; and, after a gap, printed bylaws (Reglement betreffend das Armenpflegewesen; 12 p.), 1873. Minutes of July 31, 1874 concern measures to prevent beggars from disturbing visitors at the cemetery; on February 20, 1875 the founding of a loan fund (Darlehenskasse) is discussed; minutes and announcement in May 1879 concern an increase in itinerant beggars (Wanderbettler) and admonishment of community members to refrain from giving alms directly to the needy. Includes a petition, October 1878, from the recently founded local society to aid poor Gymnasium students (Verein zur Unterstützung armer israelitischer Gymnasiasten), with printed bylaws, asking to be recognized at synagogue services (on the "Spendentafel"); the affirmative communal decision lists (with both their German and Hebrew names) the total of seven recognized charitable entities, the others being: Armenkasse; Wohltätigkeitsverein; Holzverein; Frauenverein; Jungfrauenverein; and Bekleidungsverein. One petitioner, Salomon Rosenberg, writes from Jerusalem, circa 1877 (filed with letters of 1873). Volume is exceptionally bulky, approximately 2.5 inches thick. In German with some Yiddish.

 
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10 55 Gemeinde Armen-Verwaltung, Ausgabe Beläge 1879 (Fach 40, No. 1)
Community administration for the poor, supporting documents for expenses for 1879
1879
  

Comprises almost exclusively pay orders for aid to individuals, authorized by the charitable aid commission; the only exception is one petition, from Kalman Ludwig, with notes about the commission's decision. Most of the pay orders are filled out on printed forms designed for use by the commission for this purpose (Ausgabe-Anweisung/Armen-Deputation). The signers on behalf of the charitable aid commission are H. Krauskopf, Goldstein, and M. Berliner.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
11 56 Charitable aid journal 1879 December -1887 July
  

Cashbook/journal for both income and expenses, with dated entries and monthly totals. Income includes the monthly amount budgeted from communal funds, as well as entries for individual donations, with name of donor. Expenditures include regular monthly aid entered as a lump sum, plus the names of individuals receiving other occasional aid, entered by name, for each instance. The volume is fragmentary, missing front cover, and one or more pages at both the front and the back.

 
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11 57 Charitable aid and donations 1878-1885, 1891, 1906, 1910, 1914-1915
  

Loose documents (12 items). Communal minutes/decisions related to charitable donations; petitions; appeals from organizations; and loose pay orders. The following organizations are represented with correspondence and/or reports: Jewish resort hospital (Kurhospital) in Warmbrunn, 1882; Israelitische Erziehungsanstalt Ahlem bei Hannover (illustrated letterhead), 1906; and Verein Israelitisches Krankenheim, Bad Neuenahr, 1906. One item is a petition from community member Löbel Sobotker, 1891. Two communal decisions, in 1914 and 1915, concern aid to families affected by the war, with the item in 1914 being in response to a report/petition from Rabbi Leopold Neuhaus. The pay orders are for amounts given to individuals, 1878, 1885.

 
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11 58 Collecten und milde Beiträge (Fach 18, No. 3, Vol. II)
Collections and charitable donations
1886-1893
  

Correspondence and appeals for aid (including printed fliers) from various organizations and other Jewish communities, and, in a few instances, petitions from Ostrowo members; communal minutes/decisions; pay orders (Ausgabe-Anweisung); and receipts. The following correspondents are represented: Rabbi Isaac Rülf and Memel community (appeals on behalf of Russian Jews, 1886-1887, 1890, and the community of Russian Crottingen, devastated by fire, 1889); Jewish spa hospitals (Kurhospital) in Colberg and Warmbrunn; Jewish communities of Sandberg, Neckar-Steinach, Rosenberg, Leschnitz, Moschin, Schokken, Landau/Pfalz, and Murowana-Goslin (all concerning the building of new synagogues); Nikolai Jewish community (renovation of synagogue); Deutsch-Israelitisches Kinderheim, Diez; former Ostrowo cantor Josef Bauer, and Behr Altschul, Memel (both concerning dowry for daughter); communities of Dobrzyca and Borek (both for renovation of cemetery); Israelitische Waisen-Knaben-Anstalt, Posen; Rabbi Samuel Salant, Jerusalem (for Talmud-Thora school); Jews of Forst (founding a community); Osterode community (support of family of deceased Samuel Ascher, of Rhein); Israelitisches Kinderheim, Soolbade Königsdorff-Jastrzemb; Ostrowo Rabbi Plessner (for member Süssmann); community in Salonichi (Thessaloniki; appeal in issue of Die Laubhütte, Regensburg, 1890); committee honoring Rabbi Israel Hildesheimer on his 70th birthday; Pastor Koelling, of Pitschen (for widow of Isaak Oscher); Israelitischer Hilfsverein, Frankfurt am Main, and cantor A. B. Spiro, Breslau (both concerning Samuel Hepstein/Epstein, of Lodz); Theodor Piorkowsky, Breslau, son of a former teacher in Ostrowo (daughter's wedding); Rabbi Seckel Bamberger, Schrimm (for Jewish residents of poor house in Schrimm). In 1886 fliers and a list of contributors pertain to a collection for the building of a Jewish hospital and infirmary in Ostrowo. In 1891 there are petitions from Ostrowo community members Moritz Bärnkopf, Zacharias Weiss, and Abraham Triber.

 
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11 59 Armenunterstützung und Beihilfe zu Wohltätigkeitszwecken (Fach 16, No. 7, Vol. II 1897)
Poor relief and assistance to charitable causes
1895-1903
  

Petitions for aid from organizations and individuals; receipts and correspondence concerning donations to organizations and other communities; and lists of aid recipients, circa 1899. Includes items from the following organizations: Israelitische Kinderheilstätte, Soolbade Königsdorff-Jastrzemb; Verein Freunde der Taubstummen (Association of friends of the deaf), and Verein zur Förderung der Interessen der israelitischen Taubstummen in Deutschland, Berlin; Jewish spa hospitals (Kurhospital) in Kolberg and Warmbrunn; Breslau community stipend fund for support of Jewish students; communities of Neidenburg, for member left impoverished by a fire, 1898, and Kobylagora, for support of family of deceased cantor Callmann, 1897; Comite zur Unterstützung der rumänischen Juden; Fürsorge Erziehungsanstalt Repzin; communities of Altena, 1898, Cottbus, 1901, and Pakosch, 1903, respectively (all for building a synagogue); Hilfsverein für unbemittelte jüdische Nerven- und Geisteskranke, Bad Ems/Koblenz; Verein zur Abwehr des Antisemitismus; and Jüdische Arbeiterkolonie und Asyl, Weissensee/Berlin. Other correspondents include: E. Friedländer, 1897 (resignation from the Israelitische Fremdenarmenkasse); Hermann Rosenthal, 1897 (estate of father-in-law Wolf Zellner); Rabbi Samuel Freund, 1899 (the need to address the increase in itinerant beggars; his election to the aid commission); and Rabbi Seckel Bamberger, 1900 (support for Jewish residents of poor house in Schrimm). Resolutions in February/March 1900 concern a gift to Rabbi Freimann's daughter upon her wedding; and in March 1902, a gift for synagogue attendant Jacob on his 70th birthday.

 
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11 60 Armenpflege 1918/1919
Poor relief 1918/1919
1918-1919
  

Monthly lists of community members to receive aid; receipts from organizations and individuals; pay orders; and one set of minutes/decisions of the communal charitable aid commission (Armenkommission), dated March 1918. The latter minutes contain a list of individuals designated to receive aid in the upcoming year, and the monthly amount, to be distributed pending monthly authorizations; and also a list of individuals to receive a certain amount for Passover. Some receipts from Rabbi Neuhaus and Daniel Hartmann are for amounts that they would distribute for charitable purposes. Items no. 27 and 154 are invoices for the feeding of Jewish soldiers, with itemization including the names of the soldiers. 50 items, bearing numbers, in blue pencil, ranging from 12 to 368, stored (in reverse order) in a commercial file cover (Stolzenberger Schnellhefter).

 
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11 61 Der Frauen-Verein zur Unterstützung dürftiger Frauen und Jungfrauen (Fach 19, No. 4)
Women's Association for the Support of Poor Women and Girls
1842-1854, 1868-1872
  

Correspondence between the community executive and the Frauenverein (women's association); balance sheets of the Frauenverein, 1842-1848, and of the association for soup distribution, 1870-1872; statutes of the Frauenverein, 1843, and 1844, with member signatures; correspondence with the government; communal minutes/decisions; meeting notices; membership lists; and invoices/receipts for soup distributed, 1871. Minutes of November 1868 refer to the merger of the Frauenverein with the Suppenvertheilungsverein (association for soup distribution), which was also a women's association, and its cooperation with the Jungfrauenverein (young women's association). The full name of the Frauenverein given in the statutes refers to the provision of clothing to poor women and the support of new mothers in need (Der zur Bekleidung armer Frauen und zur Unterstützung hülfsbedürftiger Wöchnerinnen sich gebildete Frauen-Verein). In 1842-1844 Anna Wehlau is treasurer and chair of the Frauenverein, with co-chairs Matilde M. Simon and Rebeka Grabower; Blume Landé submits the association's balance sheets for 1847-1848. As of April 1870, co-chairs of the Frauenverein are Pauline Hellinger and Dorchen Sonnabend; and of the soup association, Auguste Cohn, Minna Berliner, and Dorothea Lewkowitsch.

 
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11 62 Women's Association for the Support of Poor Women and Girls 1880
  

Loose documents (4 items), found laid in the previous volume (Folder 61). Includes three petitions addressed to the women's association; and one notice issued by community executive Goldstein, calling a meeting of the association. The petitioners are: Bertha Rasckower, Bertha Sternberg, and L. Fischer. The meeting notice names four women as members of the executive of the association: Emilie Landé, Pauline Hellinger, Jenny Teichmann, and Henriette Grabowska.

 
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11 63 Sämmtliche den Jugendverein betreffenden Angelegenheiten
All matters pertaining to the Youth Association
1845-1847
  

Apprenticeship contract for Fabisch Michael, 1845; contract between the association and the community executive concerning rental of space, 1846; balance sheet for year 1846; petitions; correspondence between the community executive and the association; communal minutes/decisions; three lists of dues or payments received (in Yiddish); and meeting notice, 1847, with names and signatures of members. The association was evidently devoted to the support of poor young men completing apprenticeships (in 1847 it was supporting two apprentices), and maintained a prayer house. In 1846, Sina Holzmann, Fabian Cohn, and Moritz Berliner were elected to the executive. Includes petitions from Boas Fraenkel concerning his son Mendel Baruch, and Esther Weiss, concerning her grandson Moses Piepsch. Booklet of 20 leaves.

 
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11 64 Einnahme Quittungen der Vereins-Casse zur Heranbildung jüdischer Handwerker zu Ostrowo
Income receipts of the treasury of the Association for the Training of Jewish Artisans in Ostrowo
1849-1854
  

Reports of income from monthly dues and other member contributions, with some listing members by name. Reports are approximately weekly through the end of 1849 and monthly thereafter. The earlier reports are numbered 1 to 40, in a contemporary hand, followed by approximately 32 further reports without numbering. Some reports include a separate tally of amounts collected for "Ehrenrechte" (privileges), in a listing that uses Hebrew phrases referring to Torah readings. The earliest dated report, October 1849, indicates that this association was a successor to the Jugendverein, and took over the remaining funds of the latter. The chair was Moritz Wehlau and the treasurer Moritz Berliner. The latest dated report, December 1854 (laid in), refers to a total 69 members, including 21 new members.

 
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11 65 Akten des Vereins Malbisch Arumim zu Ostrowo
Records of the Society "Malbish Arumim" of Ostrowo
1885-1887
  

Meeting circulars, with lists of members; lists of schoolchildren needing clothes; financial statement for year 1885/1886; one circular pertaining to a decision of the executive body; one recommendation letter; and one petition. The meeting notices are signed by the community chair, David Goldstein. The number of members listed on several circulars is approximately 85. The lists contain 13 or 14 names of schoolchildren, including both boys and girls. The recommendation, perhaps from a teacher, pertains to Noah Bernhard, for clothes for his bar mitzvah; the petition is from Ephraim Rockmann, concerning clothes for one of his sons. Other family names found in the lists are Dattner, Ludwig, Noah, Prager, Sobothker, and Wollheim. 20 leaves.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
12 66 B'nai B'rith Eger-Loge: Supporting documents for expenses, 1 January 1911 to 31 March 1913
1911-1913
  

Invoices, receipts, and related correspondence. The latter includes items from the parent organization in Berlin, other U.O.B.B. lodges, and charitable organizations. According to the lodge's stamp (e.g. no. 197), it was Eger Loge XIV No. 359, founded in Ostrowo on February 21, 1886. The items are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 228, and stored (in reverse order) in a commercial file cover.

 
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12 67 Eger-Loge Beläge vom 14 November 1917 bis 31 März 1919
B'nai B'rith Eger-Loge: Supporting documents for expenses, 14 November 1917 to 31 March 1919
1917-1919
  

Invoices, receipts, and related correspondence. The latter includes items from the parent organization in Berlin, other U.O.B.B. lodges, and charitable organizations. The items are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 143, and stored (in reverse order) in a commercial file cover (Stolzenberger Schnellhefter).

 
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Series V: Education, 1834-1859, 1897-1913

In German, with occasional use of Yiddish, Hebrew, and French.
8 folders
Arrangement:

Arranged roughly chronologically.

Scope and Content:

Most of the records in this series relate to the Jewish elementary school (Folders 70-72), from the time of its founding, in 1835, until 1859; and to the Hebrew religious school (Folders 73-75), from 1899 to 1907. In addition, there are two files, dating from the 1830s to 1840s, pertaining to particular government regulations: one volume (Folder 68) concerns the community's responsibility to assure that boys who had finished obligatory schooling, and had no plans for higher education, were learning a trade (and therefore would not become peddlers); another volume (Folder 69) concerns a government prohibition against teachers giving instruction to young children, if they lacked state-sponsored teaching credentials, an issue that had an impact on teachers who wished to give instruction in a cheder, or traditional Jewish school for young boys.

The community established a state-sanctioned Jewish elementary school of two classes in 1835; a new schoolhouse was built in 1841, replacing the old wooden school house that had been erected in 1760. The first teachers were Baruch Bloch (b. 1794) and Isaac Callomon (b. 1796); Bloch died in 1842, and Callomon resigned his position in 1845. Dr. Moritz Piorkowski was hired in 1843 and served until 1851. In the late 1840s a third class was established, and in the 1860s a fourth class. Teachers in the 1850s were Tobias Igel and M. Bergmann.

The records concerning the religious school (Folders 73-75) include statutes drafted by Rabbi Samuel Freund, in 1899, indicating that the school had three boys' and two girls' classes, and a preparatory class; its purpose was to teach reading and writing of Hebrew, translation of the Pentateuch and of prayers, and Jewish history and religion. According to Aron Freimann's history of the community, a dedicated religious school (Talmud Torah) had first been established in 1860.

BoxFolderTitleDate
12 68 Die aus der Schule entlassenen Knaben sowie Unterbringung und Beaufsichtigung derselben (Fach 20, No. 2)
Boys who have completed school, as well as provisions for and oversight of them
1834-1847
  

Communal minutes/decisions in individual cases; correspondence with the government; petitions and declarations by individuals; lists (Nachweisung) of boys recently turned 14 or 15 years old, with indication of the trades they are learning, or plans for such; and an apprenticeship contract for Heimann Grund, February 1843. The Jugendverein plays a role in two cases in 1835, with A. Lissner representing the association; one of those cases involves a petition from Esther Weiss concerning her son Baruch. In April 1841 two items concern master tailor Fischel Zellner's request for an apprentice. Includes correspondence and lists signed by teachers Baruch Bloch and Isaac Callomon, 1838-1842, and Dr. Piorkowski, 1847. Under paragraph 13 of the Prussian law of June 1, 1833 governing Jewish communities in Posen, communal officials were responsible for assuring that when youths in the community turned 14 years old, and had finished school (without plans for higher study), their guardians provided for them to learn a trade, and did not allow them to become peddlers. Some signatures in Yiddish.

 
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12 69 Der Privat-Schul-Unterricht (Fach 20, No. 5)
Private school instruction
1835-1836, 1841
  

Correspondence with the government and with teachers; petitions; and pay orders. Concerns a prohibition against private instruction without special permission, subject to a penalty. Included are petitions of community members, 1835, 1841, requesting the lifting of the prohibition against private religious instruction (i.e. in cheder), with respect to children under six years old who are not yet required by law to attend school; petitions to the executive from religion teachers (Mannes Abarbanell, Heiman Lindermann, and Samuel Fabisch; B. Bloch; Isaac Goldschmidt), 1835, concerning permission to give private instruction; attestation for Goldshmidt from government office in Posen, 1835, about his qualifications based on an exam; letter from Posen government office, 1841, denying permission for teachers Lindermann, Abraham Prinz, and Mordche Schmuel, to teach young children, due to lack of exam credentials. Laid in at back are several pay orders, 1841, with attached invoices from M. H. Gins, for office or school supplies. 25 leaves.

 
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12 70 Gehalt Quittungen Monath ... II. Lehrer Callomon
Receipts for disbursement of salary to 2nd teacher
1844
  

Four receipts dated June, October, November, and December, for salary paid to teacher Isaac Callomon. 4 leaves.

 
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12 71 Die Organisirung der Schule, Beschaffung und Unterhalt der Unterrichtslocalien (Fach 20, No. 3)
Organization of the Jewish elementary school; the establishment and maintenance of instruction locales
1834-1853, 1857
  

Proposal for building a schoolhouse and mikveh, with architectural drawings and cost estimates, 1840; communal minutes/decisions; correspondence internally and with the government; contract with Elisabeth Günther for rental of house as a temporary site for the school, 1835; and petitions/correspondence, especially from the teachers Baruch Bloch and Isaac Callomon, and, later, Dr. Piorkowski. Topics generally concern the maintenance and furnishing of the school premises and school supplies. Among specific items/topics: Sale of old schoolhouse (notice from Aron Stillschweig) and approval of purchase of land for the new schoolhouse, 1835. Petition to government for a loan for the new construction, 1836. Terms of the teacher's contract with Bloch, with reference to religious and Hebrew instruction and Talmud, 1836. Inadequacy of space for instruction, 1838, 1845. Termination of lease with Günther, 1841. Investigation of Callomon's responsibility for broken windows, 1843. Hiring of a caretaker, Friedrich Koehler, 1847. Proposal regarding hiring of a third teacher, 1847. Complaint against Dr. Piorkowski, 1849, with respect to his role as religion and Hebrew teacher, for conducting business on the Sabbath. Complaints of the community executive against the executive of the Jewish school, regarding the school tax (Schulbeitrag), 1850-1852. Complaint from M. Bergmann about problems arising from the location of the third class in proximity to the mikveh (Tauche), 1853. Decision, 1857, about the rental of what had been an office of the community executive on the upper floor of the school building.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
13 72 Schul-Sachen, Anstellung der Lehrer und Unterrichts-Sachen (Fach 20, No. 4)
School matters, including employment of the teachers and instructional matters
1834-1859
  

Government directives and correspondence with the government; lists of all school-age children; truancy reports; communal minutes/decisions; correspondence with teachers, teacher applicants, and book dealers, and between the community executive and the school executive (Schulvorstand); book orders with lists of student names; and invoices/receipts for books. Topics include: organization of the school program; stipulations for hiring of Baruch Bloch and Isaac Callomon, 1836; school books and supplies; exams; the hiring of a first and second teacher, 1837; applications from teacher candidates; behavior of students; teachers' leave and salary; the place of Polish language in the curriculum, and acquisition of Polish-language elementary text, 1840-1841; several poor children in need of clothing to attend school, July 1842; death of teacher Bloch, November 1842; conditions for employment of Dr. Piorkowski, December 1842; decisions regarding hiring of a third teacher, 1847, 1852; decision to employ a fourth teacher, 1858; and recommendation letter for teacher Igel, 1859. Among the correspondents: teachers I. Callomon and B. Bloch, and, later, Moritz Piorkowski, Bergmann, and Tobias Igel; assistant teacher Lazarus Callomon; applicants Jacoby Kornheim, Moritz Wormann, J. Hirschberg, Jacob Cohnstaedt, Bernhard Peyser, Jacob Ehrenfried, M. H. Cohn, Süsskind Wollheim, Krons (Borok), Simon Weintraub, cantor Schoenfeld (Stralsund), cantor J. Wolfsohn (Hirschberg), S. Wohlgemuth (Breslau), and Gabriel Lewin. In German, with one item in Hebrew and French.

 
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13 73 Die Errichtung und Verwaltung der Gemeinde-Religionsschule (Fach 20, No. 8)
Establishment and administration of the community's religious school
1897, 1899-1902
  

Communal minutes/decisions, statutes of the school, contract with teachers, correspondence with the government, petitions, list of students, invitations, meeting notices, and materials of the education committee. Draft statutes for a religious/Hebrew school are submitted to the executive by Rabbi Freund in January 1899, and then given to a specially appointed six-person commission for review. Subsequent topics include the election of an advisory board (Curatorium) for the school; adoption of the statutes; contract with teachers Haym, Körpel, and Nadel, March 1899; resignation of teachers Körpel, and Nadel, at end of 1899; hiring and salaries of teachers; teacher Haym's 25th anniversary in the profession (19 years in the Ostrowo community), 1902, with approval of a bonus, and invitation to celebration in his honor; request to rabbi to reintroduce a youth religious service; and revision of statutes, and copy sent to Kempen community (Isaac Bloch), 1902. Also included are a few items in 1897, before establishment of the school, related to a purchase of lamps by Rabbi Plessner for use by students.

 
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13 74 Administration of the community's religious school 1906, 1909, 1912
  

Loose documents (7 items), comprising a continuation of the records in the volume in Folder 73 (found laid in). Correspondence, communal decisions, minutes, petitions/proposals. Includes the following: letter from community chair Rothstein to David Goldstein, 1906, addressing him as chair of the curatorium of the religious school, and naming the other members of the curatorium; invitation, 1909, from Rabbi Freund to the community executive, concerning the school exam and Hanukkah celebration; minutes of the education committee (Unterrichts-Commission), 1912; two proposals of Rabbi Freund, 1912, one of which encloses a curricular plan for the religious school for 1912/1913; and a letter of complaint from Siegfried Imbach, 1912, to community chair Krauskopf, concerning the corporal punishment of his son, along with the subsequent recommendation of the education committee in the matter, addressed to Krauskopf.

 
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13 75 Schulbesuchs-Liste der I. Klasse der Religions-Schule zu Ostrowo
Attendance list for the 1st class of the Jewish religious school of Ostrowo
1912-1913
  

Records the absences of 28 students from May 1912 to January 1913, on a printed form.

 
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Series VI: Religious institutions and communal property, 1822-1824, 1833-1913

Predominantly in German, with occasional use of Hebrew and Yiddish, and one item bilingual in German and Polish.
15 folders
Arrangement:

Records pertaining to property and inventory generally, are followed by clusters of records pertaining mainly to the synagogue, the cemetery and mortuary, the mikveh, and the slaughterhouse.

Scope and Content:

This series contains records pertaining to religious institutions and the ownership and maintenance of communal property. A portion of these records concern communal property generally, including mortgages and other property records (Folders 76 and 79), bequests and gifts (Folder 77), and inventories of communal property items (Folder 78). One volume concerning congregational life (Kultusleben) generally (Folder 80), dated 1834 to 1891, covers diverse topics, including the synagogue budget, ritual slaughter, and religious personnel. Other records pertain to specific religious institutions, including the synagogue (Folders 81-82), the cemetery and mortuary (Folders 83-84), the mikveh (Folders 85-88) and the slaughterhouse (Folders 89-90).

Of particular note are the records related to the building of the new synagogue (1857-1860), which contain materials from architect/master bricklayer Moritz Landé and other craftsmen (Folder 81).

Related materials elsewhere in the collection include: records pertaining to community members' rental of synagogue seats, in Series II, specifically, Folders 22-28; records concerning the employment of rabbis and cantors/shochets, in Series III; and two logbooks of the slaughterhouse from the late 1830s, among financial records (Series IX), in Folders 136-137.

BoxFolderTitleDate
13 76 Privilegien und Documente (Fach 2, No. 5)
Charters and other documents
1822-1824, 1836-1874
  

Mainly documentation of mortgages, and decisions related to communal property and related debts, including original notarized documents. Specifically covers the following: Presentation of the community's 1724 charter (Privileg) in the legal case of Przygodzic v. the Jewish community, 1836-1837, which concerned communal property. Mortgage, 1839-1847, 1859-1869 (with related documents dating back to 1822-1824), pertaining to house no. 58 Raszkower Street, formerly part of the estate of widow Marie Elisabeth Thann (née Littwitz/Lüttwitz), including a communal resolution about the building of a schoolhouse at that location, 1839. Listings and descriptions of all community properties, circa 1843. Mortgage, 1857-1861, 1874, pertaining to house no. 57, formerly owned by Gottlieb Frankenberg and wife Susanne (née Friedrich), and before that apparently by the heirs of Andreas Dymale and Samuel Mittmann (with related documents dating from 1845-1848). A financial obligation pertaining to a property of Scholem Korn, house no. 6, 1863. Mortgage, 1856-1858, 1873, pertaining to house no. 56, related to the building of the new synagogue.

 
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13 77 Vermächtnisse und Geschenke (Fach 2, No. 7, Vol. I)
Bequests and gifts
1842-1875
  

Wills, probate court documents, correspondence, donor letters/court transcripts by donors, and community minutes/decisions. Gifts include items for the synagogue. The materials relate to the following donors: Schiffre Loebel, widow of Moses Loebel, 1842-1843 (with copy of a testament dated 1828). Samuel Goldstück, 1850-1852 (will/testament, 1850). Michael Maren (honorary grave for Kaskel Jacob from Krotoschin), 1847. Jacob Fuchs, 1859. Heymann Cohn, 1859. Marcus Lissner, 1859. Mendel Landau, 1959. Boas Fraenkel, 1859. Mannheim Marcus, 1860. Michael Marcus (synagogue seats), 1861-1867, including court documents related to petition from son Joseph Marcus, of Grabow, 1866, and attestations concerning holding of yahrzeit observances for Michael Marcus and his wife, 1867-1868. Minna Berliner, 1861. Brothers Julius and Leopold Katz (Katz Gebrüder), of Berlin, 1867. Moses Ungar, assistant rabbi (a clock), 1867-1869, with some Hebrew. Moritz Moll and Joseph Moll (Gebrüder Moll), of Lissa, with offer of a mortuary wagon (Leichenwagen), which the community asks to use instead for the purpose of building a mortuary (Leichenhalle), 1869-1870. Leopold Lissner, 1870. Mrs. C. Marcuse, 1870. Moritz Pulvermann, 1871-1872. Simon Spiro, 1871. Moritz Liebes, 1871, with some Hebrew. Meyer Grabowski, clock merchant, of Breslau, 1871-1872. Moritz Pilz, 1874. One item, which appears to have been misfiled, is a notice from the county court, 1873, indicating that Wolff Lewkowicz was named as guardian (Vormund) of Simon Seelig. Leaves of the volume are numbered, in blue pencil, 11 to 117.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
14 78 Die Aufnahme der Inventarienstücke der Gemeinde (Fach 1, No. 8)
Inventories and other records concerning safekeeping of communal property items
1865-1908
  

Inventories; correspondence and decisions of the executive and representatives' assembly regarding purchases and sales of property; notices of sales/auctions; and correspondence with the state archive in Posen (1887, 1893-1894), concerning the community's charter (Privileg) of 1724, which was given to the archives for safekeeping in 1887. The latest dated inventory, circa 1890s, includes items in the synagogue, the beth ha-midrash, and the mikveh (Badeanstalt), as well as some in safekeeping with various members; it has added entries with dates of acquisition of several gifts, 1895-1908. Community purchases include: a memorial medallion in honor of Sir Moses Montefiore (with a printed flier from a Montefiore commemorative committee in Frankfurt), 1865; stamps for the community executive (Vorstand) and cash office (Kasse), 1867; and a reference work (Real-Encyclopädie für Bibel und Talmud) by rabbi Jacob Hamburger of Strelitz (with two printed fliers from the author), 1867.

 
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14 79 Verkauf eines Teilgrundstückes an Epstein (Fach 22, No. 9, Vol. 1)
Sale of a partial property to Aron Epstein
1911-1912
  

Correspondence with Epstein, attorney Voss, and the government; communal minutes/decisions; typescript of agreement; and drawing/plan showing the properties. Pertains to the sale of a corner of property bordering with Epstein's property in order to facilitate construction work Epstein is undertaking and in compensation for the impact on the schoolhouse. 29 leaves.

 
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14 80 Kultus Angelegenheiten (Fach 21, No. 2, Vol. I)
Matters concerning the synagogue and congregational life
1834-1875, 1879, 1885-1891
  

Communal minutes/decisions, correspondence with the government, synagogue budgets (Etat der Cultus Verwaltung; Cultus-Etat), petitions/complaints, and announcements. Topics include budgetary and general matters related to congregational life such as salaries and honoraria for religious employees; fees for religious ceremonies; matters pertaining to kosher meat and ritual slaughter; and maintenance of the mikveh. Among specific items are the following: Inventory list of ritual objects (silver) belonging to the synagogue, 1834. Statutes of the Ner Tamid society (Verein zur Unterhaltung der beständigen Leuchte im Tempel), 1836. Government questionnaire about congregational life (Kultus- und Schulwesen), with responses, 1843. Chart of rates (Tarif), 1843, and statutes, 1871, regarding special fees (Stollgebühren). Flier from Berlin Jewish community advocating abolishment of the Jewish oath, 1850. List of eligible voters, 1851. Contract for cantor Haft, 1861. Items concerning establishment of a death register, 1869, 1871. Petitions from Berlin and Ostrowo communities concerning proposal before the parliament from the Verband der Tierschutzvereine (Association of animal protection societies) aiming to ban ritual slaughter, 1887. Correspondence with communities of Krotoschin and Pleschen, with their responses to a questionnaire, 1890. Correspondents in Ostrowo include assistant rabbis Nathan Holzmann and Moses Ungar, 1868 (with announcement in Yiddish); Rabbi Freimann, 1875; Rabbi Plessner (approximately 10 items), 1885-1888; and Samuel Herzfeld, 1887. In German, with occasional use of Yiddish and Hebrew.

 
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14 81 Der Neubau der Synagoge und deren Documente (Fach 22, No. 3)
Construction of the new synagogue
1833-1849, 1855-1862, 1865
  

Communal minutes/decisions; correspondence with the government and with craftsmen; budgets; original notarized agreements/contracts; and petitions. Topics include the purchase of property, financing of the project, sale of synagogue seats, construction, and laying of the cornerstone (April 1857). Specific items: Petition to government concerning building of the synagogue with loan of 10,000 Reichsthaler (with amortization table), 1855. Estimate of building costs and small drawing/plan of the property on Raszkower Strasse, by architect Moritz Landé (signs as "Maurermeister," master bricklayer, or mason). Agreement with Josef Alexander von Nasierowski, of Gross-Wysocko, for a loan of 6,000 Thaler, 1856, bilingual, in Polish and German. Contract for purchase of the property at no. 56 Raszkower Strasse from baker Wilhelm Hühnsdorf and his wife Friederike (née Henschke), 1856, with related documents, 1833-1849, pertaining to their earlier acquisition of the property from Carl Basinski, heir of Simon Basinsky. Contract, 1857, for the purchase of property at Raszkower Strasse no. 57 from widow Susanna Frankenberg (née Friedrich), with related earlier documents, 1844-1846, pertaining to the Frankenbergs' acquisition of it from widow Catharina Dymale (née Sojka), and previous ownership, and a later document (at back) pertaining to the mortgage, 1865. Attestations from craftsmen Goetzig, Doepel, and Jacobi concerning work on the synagogue, 1857. Copy of attestation concerning the laying of cornerstone, with Hebrew passage.

 
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14 82 Umbau des Treppenaufganges in der Synagoge und deren Umgebung (Fach 22, No. 6, Vol. 1)
Renovation of the staircase in the synagogue and vicinity
1890-1896
  

Correspondence with craftsmen and with the government, communal minutes/decisions, plans and blueprints, permits, cost estimates, and one invoice. Mostly concerns construction of a new staircase in the synagogue to provide additional exits from the women's seating area. The first document (minutes, 1890) makes reference to the tragic incident of 1872 (see Folder 103) as a background for the present renovations; earlier the doors were changed to open outward instead of inward but there was no follow-up on a proposal to create new exits. Other renovations pertain to the mikveh and the slaughterhouse. Includes items from carpenters/bricklayers Paul Kupke and F. Dymaski. One item in 1896 is a letter from Rabbi Plessner, concerning a donation of 1,000 Marks from someone in Strzyzów, which the council decides to put toward synagogue renovations. The leaves in approximately the first half of the volume are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 81.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
15 83 Der Neubau einer Leichenhalle, der Umbau des Hauses No. 57, die Errichtung von Umwährungen, etc. (Fach 22, No. 4)
Construction of a mortuary, renovation of house no. 57, erection of fences, etc.
1872-1874, 1882-1885
  

Drawings/plans (f. 54-56, 61-62, 92-93), communal minutes/decisions, cost estimates for construction projects, correspondence with craftsmen and with the government, correspondence between the executive and the building commission, and meeting notices. The building projects include the renovation of no. 57 Raszkower Strasse for a rabbi's residence, the building of a mortuary (Leichenhalle) in 1873, the erection of fencing near the small synagogue (Beth Hamidrasch), and a new path to the cemetery. Among specific topics/items: Re-financing of the community's debt (1872, f. 1-3). Cost estimates by master bricklayer Doepel (f. 4-23, 49-50, 105). Letter from Moritz Landé evaluating certain proposals for work, 1873 (f. 28-29). Acquisition of a mortuary wagon from Otto Sachs Wagen-Fabrik (f. 24-25, with printed drawing laid in; f. 65). Proposals from master bricklayer Georgi, pertaining to renovation of no. 57 and other projects (f. 37-48, 80-82, 103-104). Evaluation of synagogue roof by tinsmith (Klempner) Schachtel, 1874 (f. 101). Petition from Wilhelm Cohn concerning the condition of the cemetery, with diagram of the cemetery, 1882. Cost estimate of tinsmith Leopold Haltin for work on the mortuary, 1885. The leaves in approximately the first two thirds of the volume are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 105.

 
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15 84 Cemetery/burial plots
1907-1913
  

Loose documents (13 items). Includes correspondence, communal minutes/decisions, and one announcement. Mostly concerns purchases and care of burial plots, and upkeep of the cemetery. One item is from the Memel community burial society (G. Millner), requesting a copy of the Ostrowo community's statutes related to burial costs. Other correspondents: Daniel Hoppe, Conrad Seidel, Arthur Brandt (son of Salo Brandt), Emanuel Jacobwitz, and Bertha Wollheim.

 
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15 85 Der Neubau und Unterhaltung der Tauche und des Schulgebäudes (Fach 23, No. 2)
Construction and maintenance of the mikveh and the schoolhouse
1835-1849, 1852, 1855
  

Communal minutes/decisions, announcements, correspondence with the government, petitions/complaints, tax list, cost estimates, contracts, and invoices. Among specific items/topics: Conditions for building the mikveh (f. 4). Copy of letter from Rabbi Auerbach about the need for a mikveh (f. 31). Purchase of land at no. 52, from widow Rosine Lebicke (contract, f. 45-46), for the mikveh, and at no. 58, from the Thann heirs (f. 65), for the schoolhouse. Cost estimate by master bricklayer Doepel, for both buildings, 1840 (f. 114-118; also: f. 213). Tax list pertaining to the building costs, 1841 (f. 134-136, 150-153). Contract with bricklayer Maximilian Jacobi (f. 156-158). Contracts, 1842, with coppersmith Frank Kutscherra (f. 171-172, 175-176) and cooper Jacob Itzig Glaser (f. 173, f. 176), related to the steam apparatus and bathing tubs for the mikveh. Drawing/plan of the mikveh layout (f. 177). Invoices from Doepel (f. 188-189), Kutscherra (f. 190-191), Jacobi (195-198), and master mechanic Zielezinski (1845, f. 211). Contract with and invoice from chimney sweep master August Pompej (f. 201-202, 223). Letters of complaint from Jacob Wehlau, 1844 (f. 207-209), Löbel Sonnabend, 1845 (f. 212, 219), and Rabbi Stössel, 1855 (f. 230), about maintenance problems in the mikveh. Cost estimate and invoice from well and canal master (Brunnen- und Röhrmeister) C. Gratz, 1855 (f. 228-229, 231). The leaves of the volume are numbered, in black ink, 1 to 231; a note on the first page indicates that the leaves were numbered (and the volume assembled?) in 1866.

 
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15 86 Administration and maintenance of the mikveh
1865-1887, 1890-1893, 1900
  

Communal minutes/decisions; announcements; correspondence with the government, other communities, tradesmen, and mikveh superintendents; petitions; rules of the mikveh; contracts with mikveh leaseholders and with tradesmen; financial reports; invoices; and inventories. Topics concern the leasing and administration of the mikveh; petitions from community members for reduction of fee; and supplies for, repair and maintenance of the mikveh. Among specific items: Contracts with superintendents (Bademeister, Badewärter) Aron Mueller, 1867; Dora Sonnabend, 1870; Gottlieb Kroll, 1871; Carl Schoschnitz, 1873; August Schoschnitz, 1874; Zacharias Weiss, 1878, 1880, 1883; and Robert Herde, 1900. Rules of the Ostrowo mikveh, April-May 1868, September 1870. Documents setting out terms (Bedingungen) of a contract with the superintendent (Kastellan und Bademeister), March 1874, or for leasing (Verpachtung) of mikveh revenue, 1870, 1875, 1876, 1878. Inventories of the mikveh are generally included each time a new superintendent takes office. Petition of Rabbi Holzmann on behalf of poor women of the community, July 1868. Correspondence with the Jewish communities of Reinerz (with copy of business rules of mikveh commission), 1867; Posen, 1868; Kalisch, 1872; and Lissa, 1881. Application letters for superintendent position, January 1878, March-April 1884. Revision of building tax, 1879. Volume is missing front cover.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
16 87 Die Renovation und Verwaltung der Tauche (Badeanstalt) (Fach 23, No. 6, Vol. III)
Renovation and administration of the mikveh (bathhouse)
1891-1895, 1898-1907
  

Mostly concerns the mikveh, with a small amount of material related to the employment of a cemetery caretaker. Includes correspondence with the government, other Jewish communities, tradesmen, and mikveh superintendents; communal minutes/decisions; minutes/decisions of the mikveh commission (Badeverwaltung); statements of the mikveh's income and expenses (for April 1901 - April 1907); announcements; invoices; and cost estimates. Among specific items/topics: Responses from Jewish communities of Pleschen, 1891, with a plan of the Pleschen mikveh; and Sammter, 1900, 1901. Government notices about inspections of the mikveh finding deficiencies, 1892, 1898, 1902, 1904-1906. Termination of Zacharias Weiss as superintendent, 1892-1893, 1899. Hiring announcement and termination letter related to Carl Walter, 1900, 1901. Contracts with Josef Sobczyński, of Pleschen, for new steam generator, 1893; and with H. Kaliski, for plumbing work, 1901. Application letters for position of bath attendant (Badewärter), 1901. Application letter from Friedrich Preuss for position of school attendant, 1901. Application letters for position of cemetery caretaker (Friedhofswächter), 1902, 1904. Minutes of cemetery commission, 1904. Minutes of the mikveh (Badeanstalt) commission, 1905-1906. Water usage/water tax, 1903, 1905. Reported injury of Badewärter Stieler, 1902. Contracts with attendants (Badediener und Kastellan) Carl Stillwachs, March 1903, and Paul Smulka, September 1904.

 
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16 88 Renovation and administration of the mikveh 1909-1913
  

Loose documents (6 items), comprising a continuation of the records in the volume in Folder 87 (found laid in). Communal minutes/decisions, statements of income and expenses, and memorandums/cover notes. Includes four annual statements, April 1908 to March 1913. The memorandums are from B. Weiss, head of the mikveh commission (on his letterhead as a leather dealer), to the community executive, several enclosing statements, and one concerning his declining to chair the audit committee (Kassen-Revisions-Commission).

 
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16 89 Die Veranlagung zur Fleischerei Berufsgenossenschaft (Fach 14, No. 13)
Assessment for the Professional Association of Butchers
1902-1906
  

A few items of correspondence, 1905-1906, regarding mandatory membership in the national professional association for butchers (Fleischerei-Berufsgenossenschaft), which had its seat in Mainz; and statutes and newsletters of the association, 1902-1903. Includes a report of the association's classification of the community's slaughter facility into a certain risk category (Gefahrenklasse), in the context of government insurance regulations, with accompanying classification table. Two items of correspondence are letters from the Posen and the Pleschen Jewish communities, respectively, in reply to inquiries from the Ostrowo community, concerning their stance toward the requirement to join the association (both say they have complied). The statutes ("Neues Statut der Fleischerei-Berufsgenossenschaft"), as of January 1902, are contained in a printed pamphlet of 95 pages, with inclusion of copies of two laws, of June 1900, concerning accident insurance. Also included are three issues of the association's newsletter (Mitteilungen), 2. Jahrgang (1903), no. 11, 13, and 16, with some handwritten markings highlighting articles that address objections of Jewish communities to the obligatory membership of the shochets in the association and the concomitant obligation to insurance.

 
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16 90 Purchase of slaughterhouse equipment
1911
  

Loose documents (4 items). Includes an inquiry from the municipal stockyard about the status of the community's plans to purchase an iron head holder; an exchange with the manufacturer H. Hauptner, Berlin, concerning the community's request to receive the item for inspection before deciding on the purchase; and a postcard from Hauptner acknowledging receipt of payment.

 
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Series VII: Court cases, 1823-1828, 1836-1866

In German, with some use of Yiddish in one file.
9 folders
Arrangement:

Arranged roughly chronologically.

Scope and Content:

This series contains files on several court cases in which the community was a litigant, in most cases as a defendant, and twice (Folders 97 and 99) as a plaintiff. In each instance, the subject of the case is indicated in a separate paragraph at the end of the folder description. Two cases concern ongoing obligations stemming from the community's original charter of 1724, one having to do with quit rents owed to the noble estate that granted the charter (Folder 91), the other with an annual tribute owed to the local Catholic church (Folder 94). Another case relates to a loan the community took out from the Catholic Church in 1760 (Folder 93), one of several it had needed in order to finance the construction of its first communal buildings.

These files overlap with those in Subseries IX.1, since they pertain to community finances. Three are typical administrative files of the community executive (Folders 94, 96, and 97), and are explicitly labeled as such (with the phrase "Acta der Verwaltungs-Beamten der israelitischen Corporation zu Ostrowo" prefacing the title). The others consist of plain gatherings of leaves, with varying title pages referring to the court case and/or the attorney representing the community. Three date from the 1820s (Folders 91-93), prior to the establishment of the communal governance structure that is otherwise reflected in the current records.

A few materials related to other court cases can be found elsewhere in the collection: Goldstücker family v. Jewish community of Ostrowo, 1855 (see Folder 100); and the Jewish community of Ostrowo v. Jacob Stahl, 1865 (Folder 123).

BoxFolderTitleDate
16 91 Adhibenda der Acten 'Dominial' Entschädigungs-Ansprüche; Acta manualia des Justitz-Commissarius Panthen; Przygodzic v. Ostrowo, wegen Zins (Litt. P, No. 44)
Addendum to the records 'Dominial' compensation claims; file of Commissary of Justice Panthen; Przygodzice v. Jewish community of Ostrowo, concerning interest
1823-1828
  

Correspondence with the government/court, and court documents. Includes a chart giving number of houses and amount paid in 1803, 1819, and 1826 (f. 3v-4r) and list of 39 heads of household in 1826 (f. 4v-5r). Leaves are numbered, in red pencil, 1 to 13.

Concerns a suit brought in the court of Krotoszyn by the estates of Przygodzice, against the Jewish community of Ostrowo, pertaining to certain quit-rents owed, based on the number of businesses and heads of household, as specified in the community's charter (Privileg) of 1724.

 
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16 92 Löbel Zukermann & Consort v. Synagoge Ostrowo
Löbel Zukermann et al. v. Jewish community of Ostrowo
1827-1828
  

Correspondence with the government/court, accounts, court notices of payments due for courtroom expenses, court documents, and receipts. Includes a tax list in Yiddish (111 names) dated December 1827. Blank cover. German title from loose fragment of a cover that probably corresponds to a different volume related to the same case. Some use of Yiddish.

Concerns a lower court (Friedensgericht) case related to communal taxes. The complainants are four former community elders, Loebel Zuckermann, Aron Grabower, Samuel Gerstmann, and Abraham Pulvermann, who served in 1824-1825. One set of documents dated June 1827 refers to the case of Baruch Krotoszyner v. Zuckermann et al. (the same group of former community elders).

 
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16 93 Acta manualia des Landgerichts Rath Springer in Sachen Probst Kramarkiewicz v. Synagoge Ostrowo
File of court attorney Springer in the case of Propst Kramarkiewicz (Catholic Church) v. Jewish community of Ostrowo
1827-1828
  

Correspondence with the government/court, including official (Landgerichts-Rath) Springer in Krotoszyn, and court documents. 21 leaves.

Concerns a lower court (Friedensgericht) case related to a debt the community owed to the Catholic Church that originated in 1760.

 
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16 94 Die Ablösung des an die katholische Kirche hierselbst zu liefernden Schiesspulver und Talg (Fach 15, No. 6)
Repayment of the tribute of gun powder and tallow owed to the Catholic Church in Ostrowo
1836-1842, 1857-1858
  

Correspondence with the government/court, communal minutes/decisions, and court documents. Includes the community's petition to the regional appeals court in Posen, December 1837 (f. 18-19). In a decision formulated as an official contract (Ablösungs-Vertrag), Ostrowo, October 1839, stamped and sealed in Posen, in November (f. 31-34), the old tribute was replaced with a monetary payment of 100 Thaler, due at the beginning of July. A new suit by the church in 1842 concerns interest due because of late payment. The correspondence in 1857-1858 appears to concern a shortfall in the budget concerning the payment due (Ablösungsgeld), in connection with the purchase of lot No. 57 from widow Frankenberg. Leaves of the volume dated 1836-1842 are numbered, in red pencil, 1 to 42, followed by four unnumbered leaves dated 1857-1858.

Concerns legal issues pertaining to tributes owed by the Jewish community to the local Catholic church under paragraph 8 of the original 1724 Ostrowo Jewish community charter, which stated that the community would annually "provide the parish church in Ostrowo with one stone of tallow at Easter for lamps and two pounds of gun powder for salvos upon the resurrection."

 
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16 95 Acta manualia des königl. Justiz-Commissarius Mittelstädt in Sachen Lissner gegen Ostrowo wegen 300 Rth (Litt. L, No. 63)
File of Commissary of Justice Mittelstädt in the case of Moses Lissner v. Jewish community of Ostrowo, concerning 300 Reichsthaler
1842-1844
  

Correspondence with the government/court, communal minutes/decisions, and statement of court expenses. 29 leaves.

Concerns a debt owed to master bricklayer Maximilian Jacobi in connection with the building of the schoolhouse, with Moses Lissner, of Pless, Upper Silesia, acting as plantiff after Jacobi cedes to him the claim against the community ("Cession" contract, 1842).

 
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16 96 Die Forderung des Kreis-Physikus Dr. Koschny an die hiesige jüdische Korporation (Fach 15, No. 7)
Claim of county physician Koschny against the Jewish community of Ostrowo
1843-1850
  

Correspondence with Koschny and with the government, communal minutes/decisions, and court documents; contracts. Included is a copy of the contract of master bricklayer Maximilian Jacobi, 1841, for the building of the schoolhouse; minutes of proceedings ("Cession"), April 1843, pertaining to the transfer of the debt to Koschny; contract, May 1847, concerning payment of the debt to Koschny.

Concerns a debt originally owed to master bricklayer Jacobi under his contract for the schoolhouse, with Dr. Koschny acting as plaintiff in the legal case, in 1845, after the claim against the community is ceded to him.

 
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16 97 Corporation wider Tauchenpächter Müller (Fach 14, No. 7 or 8?)
Jewish community of Ostrowo v. mikveh leaseholder J. Müller
1847-1848
  

Correspondence with the government, court documents, and communal minutes/decisions. Includes testimony by Dore Sonnabend, who previously held the post of mikveh superintendent, in year 1846; Moses Kaliski, plumber; August Martin, glazier; and Salim Korn, the current superintendent (in 1848). The last item in the volume, a printed form filled in by hand (Bekanntmachung an den Kläger im Bagatellprozess) appears to concern the settling of a different case, the community v. furrier Joseph Korn. 34 leaves.

Concerns a contractual dispute with the former superintendent of the mikveh, with the community apparently asserting that he owed two months' back rent on the room he occupied in connection with his post, as well as the cost of certain repairs in the mikveh.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
17 98 File of attorney Loewy in the case of Moses Berliner v. Jewish community of Ostrowo
1865
  

Correspondence with the government/court, and correspondence to attorney Loewy from the Ostrowo community, enclosing copies of relevant items; copy of the complaint; copy of the synagogue seat contract of 1858; on-site evaluation of the synagogue seat carried out by Jacob Fuchs and master bricklayer Doepel, as technical experts; and other court documents, including a copy of the response to the complaint submitted by Loewy on behalf of the community. The front of the gathering is labeled informally, apparently by or for attorney Loewy. 20 leaves.

Concerns how the erection of a pillar in front of one of the synagogue seats purchased by Berliner impinged on the seat, giving grounds for a price reduction.

 
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17 99 Jewish community of Ostrowo v. H. Krauskopf
1866
  

Correspondence with the government/court, including notice of court appointment, invoice of attorney Jahn, and response concerning attorney's fees; copies of promissory notes given by Krauskopf; and treasurer's report to the executive about Krauskopf's payments. Booklet of six leaves, plus three loose leaves.

Concerns amount owed by Krauskopf as collector of the meat tax (Krupken-Pächter).

 
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Series VIII: General communal correspondence and ephemera, 1824, 1834-1915

Predominantly in German, with some Yiddish, and occasional use of Hebrew, and one newspaper issue that is partially bilingual, in German and Polish.
14 folders
Arrangement:

Correspondence is followed by attestations/recommendations, and files pertaining to announcements.

Scope and Content:

This series contains correspondence, petitions, and communal minutes/decisions on a variety of topics (Folders 100-106); attestations on behalf of community members or employees, mostly by the community council (Folders 107-108); and correspondence and fliers pertaining to communal meetings, announcements, and special events (Folders 109-113).

Included are files concerning estates and guardianships (Folder 101); the community's participation in an association seeking to found Jewish agricultural colonies in the province of Posen (Folder 102); and programs and announcements for patriotic occasions such as birthdays and deaths of rulers, and the celebration of Sedan Day (Folder 113).

Of particular note is a file concerning the tragic incident that occurred during services in the synagogue on the eve of Yom Kippur on October 11, 1872 (Folder 103), in which 14 women, two girls, and two younger children were killed in a panic during a false fire alarm, after the gas lights went out. The materials pertain to condolences and charitable aid for the families of the victims.

Some communal announcements in the late 1830s to early 1840s are bilingual, in German and Yiddish (Folders 109-110). Other such bilingual announcements are found elsewhere in the collection, for example in Folders 48 and 128.

BoxFolderTitleDate
17 100 Korrespondenzen gemischten Inhalts: Gesuche, Beschwerden (Fach 24, No. 3, Vol. III)
Correspondence of mixed content: petitions, complaints, etc.
1838-1851, 1855, 1857
  

Petitions/complaints, communal minutes/decisions, and correspondence with the government. Topics are often related to individuals' contributions to communal taxes. Among other topics: Appeal concerning the Kranken-Verein (f. 5). Burial plot for widow Brummer (f. 15-17). Members moving away, without settling their account with the community (f. 36, 42, 48-49), or other jurisdiction issues (Lissner, f. 50-51, 56, 64-65, 71; Raszkower, 62). Wedding fees (f. 37, 44). Parent's complaint about corporal punishment of son by teacher Bloch (f. 40). Complaint by executive S. Gerstmann about being publicly insulted (f. 46-47). Calculation of military recruitment tax (f. 54-55, 66). Young man without an occupation (f. 61). Complaints of kosher meat tax collector (Krupken-Pächter) Nathan Peiser about individuals bypassing the rules (f. 69, 72). Report of the executive concerning expenses such as the moving costs of cantor Rosenthal, and the Jugendverein's use of a former rabbi's residence, 1843. Provisions for orphan son of Heimann Baruch, of Olobock, 1843-1844. Application of S. L. Krotoszyner for position of clerk. Report of executive Abraham Cohn, 1847, pertaining to a payment originating under his predecessor, with mention that the pay order is in Hebraic characters instead of the mandatory German. Appeals concerning exclusion from list of eligible voters, 1847. Appeals of fines. Fine of office caretaker for a missing item. Guardianship of orphan Simon Pulvermann, son of Marcus and Dorchen (née Hirsch, d. 1848). Legal case of Goldstücker family (son and widow of Samuel), of Festenberg, against the Jewish community of Ostrowo, 1855. Query from the court in an investigation pertaining to two carpenters, 1857. The leaves in the earlier part of the volume are numbered, in red or plain pencil, 1 to 81, followed by some 40 unnumbered leaves at back.

 
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17 101 Verlassen- und Vormundschafts-Sachen (Fach 24, No. 9)
Matters related to estates and guardianships
1835-1840, 1847, 1859-1865, 1873
  

Correspondence with the government, concerning death certificates, birth certificates, and administrative matters related to cases of estates and guardianships. Family names include (in order of first occurrence): Weiss, Tisch, Aron, Zuckermann, Baruch, Ledermann, Raszkower, Jonas, Schiffer, Lewy/Levi, Wagner, Hirschfeld, Salzmann, Tuchmann, Müller, Korn, Silberstein, Wollheim, Rosenthal, Rokmann, Schwarz. See also items related to guardianship cases in Folders 77 (Seelig) and 100 (Pulvermann). The leaves of the volume are numbered, in red pencil, 1 to 66, followed by six unnumbered items at back.

 
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17 102 Die Colonisation der Juden im Grossherzogthum Posen (Fach 24, No. 11)
Jewish colonization in the Grand Duchy of Posen
1846
  

Concerns the newly founded organization Central-Verein zur Begründung der Colonisation der Juden in der Provinz Posen, headed by Rabbi Salomon Eger (Eiger), Posen, which aimed to establish Jewish agricultural colonies in the Posen province. Includes, in the first few leaves, correspondence with the Verein, dated April to August 1846, as well as one item, in May, addressed to the Jewish communities of Raschkow and Adelnau, forwarding the initial letter received from the Verein. The remainder of the volume comprises approximately 90 applications (petitions addressed to the community executive) from individual Ostrowo community members interested in becoming colonists, dated May to June 1846. Some signatures in Yiddish.

 
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17 103 Die am Vorabende des Versöhnungsfeste 5633/am 11. Oktober 1872 in der Synagoge zu Ostrowo stattgehabte unglückliche Katastrophe (Fach 24, No. 16)
The unfortunate catastrophe that took place on the eve of Yom Kippur 5633/ 11 October 1872 in the Ostrowo synagogue
1872-1875
  

Correspondence, newspaper announcement, communal minutes/decisions, petitions for aid, and records of expenses and donations. Specific items include: Letters offering condolences, assistance, and/or donations from: R. Moser, Berlin; Rabbi S. Nascher, Berlin; the orphans’ home in Schwerin an der Warthe, with a printed copy of the statutes (Israelitisches Waisenhaus für Knaben, founded by Jean Benda, 1865/1867); the Jewish communities of Posen, Leipzig, and Belgard; Rabbi Ludwig Philippson (several items on letterhead as editor of Allgemeine Zeitung des Judenthums); Julie Gerson-Liebermann, Berlin. A copy of an Adelnauer county newspaper (Kreis-Wochen-Blatt, October 20, 1872) containing an ad from the community's aid committee soliciting donations to help the children who lost their mothers in the accident. Letter from Rabbi David Joel, Krotoschin, containing the text of a sermon he gave. Petition from Salomon Soberski, whose wife sustained an eye injury. Letters from Minna Prausnitz, Breslau, about the gravestone for her mother and, later, for aid; and Pauline Landau, with doctor's letter. One item, apparently misfiled, is a petition for aid, in June 1873, from Talmud scholar Lazarus Auerbach (son of the community's former rabbi M. Auerbach), with drafts of two attestations the community wrote on his behalf. Includes one receipt written in Yiddish; the newspaper is partially bilingual, in German and Polish.

 
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17 104 Various
1838-1842, 1880-1897
  

Loose documents (11 items). Correspondence, communal minutes/decisions, and miscellaneous financial records. Includes the following: a letter from the government and communal minutes/decision in matters concerning the testament of Michael Brummer, 1838. Journal entries (Anweise-Buch) for expenses, 1840. Fragment of a blank ledger page, 1842. List possibly related to collection of taxes, 1880. Postal receipt, 1886. First page of the communal tax list for year 1890/1891. Decision about a raise of salary for the Jewish elementary school teacher, 1894. Three receipts for dues of the Holzverein (wood society), 1896-1897.

 
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17 105 Various
circa 1900-1915
  

Loose documents (17 items). Correspondence and communal minutes/decisions, and ephemera. Includes the following: Letter from Rabbi Freund, 1907 (after his move to Hannover), concerning the 50th wedding anniversary of Salzmann couple (enclosing government letter of 1904, related to an inquiry about the date of their marriage). Petition from J. L. Friedmann seeking to resign from position as caretaker of the beth ha-midrash, 1908. Decision about kosher meat tax collection and raising of slaughter fees, 1909. Letter of condolences to Rabbi Freund upon death of his father, and his thank-you letter in response, 1910. Exchange with Moritz Woznianski concerning tax payment following his move, 1911. Draft attestation for teacher Nadel (23 years in post), circa 1912. Internal communal communication concerning process of absorbing the Raszkow community, 1912. Three items concerning repairs: synagogue roof, 1912; hearse, 1913; and synagogue clock, 1913. Letter from Rabbi Neuhaus concerning conditions for community members' receiving matzot without a bread ration slip (Brotmarke), 1915. Several undated items including a receipt (on a printed card) from Jacob Stillschweig, milliner, Ostrowo; an announcement written on a slip of scrap paper; a sheet of perforated kosher meat tax slips for goose; a blank illustrated form for a school commendation; and a blank government form for school curriculum plan.

 
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17 106 Various
1884, 1893-1913
  

Loose documents (25 items). Correspondence with the government and others, communal minutes/decisions, meeting notice, and blank forms. Includes membership correspondence from the Deutsch-Israelitische Gemeindebund (DIGB), and the Verband deutscher Juden, mostly in 1911. One item from the DIGB, 1893, concerns a course for teacher Nadel. The remaining items: Form for recording incoming mail, with five entries filled in, 1898. Registration form for testament of Lina Neumark, 1903. Appeals for support from Jewish community of Namslan, for renovation of the synagogue, 1906; and from the Verein zur Unterhaltung einer israelitischen Kinderbewahranstalt, Cologne, 1911. Correspondence concerning a promised contribution to the Posen fund for itinerant poor (Provinzialkasse für Wanderarmenfürsorge), 1911. Letter from Siegfried Tuchmann, Berlin, concerning a support payment to be directed to his grandmother. Notice for foreclosure auction of property of horse dealer Leopold Pick, 1912. Typed meeting notice, circa 1913. Blank forms for school graduation certification (Entlassungs-Zeugnis); burial costs due to the Chevra Kadisha (Israelitische Krankenpflege- und Beerdigungs-Verein); and tax contributions due to the community.

 
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17 107 Führungsatteste (Fach 24, No. 6)
Attestations of good conduct
1834-1848, 1861, 1865-1894
  

Petitions for, and copies of attestations (of good standing/character, identity, and/or marital status) for community members (or former members), by the Ostrowo Jewish community, or, in a few instances, another party. Pertains to the following individuals (in order of occurrence), in 1834-1848: Joseph F. Cohn, Michael Brockman, Moses Kaliski, Baer Wolf, Wolf Fischer, Selig Cohn, Fischel Zellner, Joseph Itzig Cohn, Dorel Sonnabend (petition by husband Loebel), Aron Grabowski, Hirsch Rasz (concerning birth in Krotoschin, attested by Krotoschin community), Itzig Nossen, Jacob Labischiner, Herman Gins, Loebel Warschauer (petition by father Marcus), Aron Landsberg, Michael Guttmann (petition by father Jacob), Itzig Nossen (tailor apprenticeship attested by Loebel Nossen), Meyer Kletschewski (tailor apprenticeship attested by Aron Zellner and two others), Lewin Stern (service as cantor and shochet, attested by the community of Neustadt bei Pinne), S. L. Krotoschiner/Krotoszyner, Nathan Marcus, Samuel Weissbein, Moritz Gerstmann, cantor/shochet Salomon Herz, Ernestine Goldschmidt, Baruch Goldmann, Hanne Herman, Moritz Apt, Jacob Krotoszyner, Abraham Lindermann (petition by father Heymann). In 1861-1894: physician Joseph Rawitz (for newspaper announcement), Jacob Guttmann, assistant rabbi Moses Apt, Abraham Rosengarten, Loebel Munk, Jacob Rosengarten (petition for naturalization), Bertha Kroh (to marry Simon Blay, Kalisch), Raaze/Rosalie Ledermann, Aron and Mirjam Simon, Rosalie and Moses Wollheim, Josel Leib, David Guttmann, Bertha Mayer (née Wisniewska), Elkan Tisch and wife Riwke Rachel (née Markewicz), Salomon Dattner, Isaac Wien, Wolf and Pauline Getschlig, Moritz Lachs and wife Hanne Branche (née Warenkneht), cantor Beer from Galicia, Michaelis Heim, August Schoschnik, Beile Rifke Noah, shochet/cantor Löbel Lewinski, Marcus Dunkelmann, David Winter, Philippine Tuch, Abraham Trieber, Selig and Dore Abbe, Moritz Kaliski, Salomon Soberski, Heimann Kaliski, and Moritz Kaliski. Some signatures in Yiddish.

 
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17 108 Attestation of Rabbi Mannheim Auerbach on behalf of Salomon Itzig Borker, tailor's apprentice
1846
  

Loose document (1 item). For Borker's apprenticeship journey (Wanderschaft). Accompanied by a slip of paper stamped by the relief office (Wohlfahrtsamt) of the Jewish community (of Ostrowo?), signed H. Schall, dated 1930.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
18 109 Verschiedene Publicanda (Fach 24, No. 7)
Various announcements
1834-1849, 1852, 1867, 1876
  

Requests by the government and individuals for items to be publicly announced. Includes some of the actual announcements. Among the topics: sale of synagogue seats, by Isaac Jacobsohn, 1836, before move to Breslau (f. 4), and David Fuchs, 1839 (f. 16; seat of deceased Gerson Kroll); offer of reward for return of a child's silver spoon lost by the royal tax collector, 1842 (f. 31); sale of items from the estate of widow Catharine Striege, 1842 (f. 33); procedures for announcing prayers in the synagogue (flier for posting, in Yiddish), circa 1842; a circular from the Bromberg Jewish community, 1848, with an example of the official stamp (in Hebrew characters) that all kosher meat from that community should carry; obituary for Jacob Wehlau, 1867, to be published in the Breslauer Zeitung; and announcement of the death of Moritz Pulvermann, 1876. The leaves in approximately the first half of the volume are numbered, in red or plain pencil, roughly 1 to 31. Several Yiddish or bilingual, German and Yiddish, announcements, circa 1839-1842.

 
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18 110 Announcement fliers; miscellaneous
undated, 1824, 1841-1844
  

Loose documents (11 items). Mostly fliers for posting, bearing announcements to community members from the community executive, 1841-1843, 8 items, all bilingual, in German and Yiddish, and signed by the chair, S. Gerstmann. Also includes three miscellaneous items: an undated tax classification list, an undated list of taxes paid, in Yiddish, and a list of contributors for Passover flour, 1824, in Yiddish. The announcements are on various topics, including obtaining candles for use in the synagogue; payment of taxes, or back taxes; and assistant cantors' partaking of meals at weddings and circumcisions.

 
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18 111 Verschiedene Currenden an die Verwaltungs-Beistände, Veranlagungs-Commission und Einschätzungs-Commission (Fach 24, No. 13)
Various meeting notices to the administrative bodies, the assessment commission and the appraisal commission
1847-1855, 1866-1881
  

Several hundred circulars announcing meetings of the executive, the representatives' assembly, or, occasionally, of a specific committee such as for appraisal of tax contributions (Einschätzung, 1852) or charitable aid (Armen-Deputation, 1880). The notices list the recipients being called to the meeting, with signatures. They often refer broadly to the topic of the meeting, and in the later period (from 1866 on) some give detailed agendas. Also includes two public announcements from the community executive, in June and July 1879, concerning slaughter fees.

 
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18 112 Meeting notices
1888-1891, 1894
  

Loose documents (49 items). Circulars announcing community meetings, all signed by community executive chair David Goldstein; a few are co-signed by H. Krauskopf as chair of the representatives' assembly. The majority pertain to meetings of the executive, or joint meetings of the executive body and the representatives' assembly (September and November 1890, June 1891). Some items pertain to meetings of other entities: Verein Malbish Arumim (Society for clothing the needy; December 1888, June 1889), committee for the audit of the community treasury (Kassen-Revision; January 1890), charitable aid committee (Armen-Deputation/Armenvorstand, several meetings in 1890-1891; joint meeting with Chevra Kadisha and Armenvorstand, September 1890), and executive of the Talmud Torah school (October 1890). One meeting (November 1890) has to do with the bonding of the collector of the kosher meat tax (Krupkensteuer), with participants including Rabbi Plessner and cantor/shochet Davidsohn.

 
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18 113 Patriotische Kundgebungen und Andachtsübungen (Fach 24, No. 15)
Patriotic announcements and special prayer services
1866-1897
  

Government directives, correspondence with the government and others, announcements, meeting notices, and communal minutes/decisions. Several items relate to the Austro-Prussian War of 1866, including an appeal letter from Moses Pinner about a publication of the Jewish community of Berlin for charitable purposes; government directives concerning prayers to commemorate the peace settlement; and an announcement, with program, of a religious service. Some items pertain to religious services and charitable activity during the Franco-Prussian War, and celebration of the peace settlement, 1870-1871. Other topics include: community members' voting in the parliamentary election, 1867; synagogue services in honor of the birthday of King Wilhelm I, 1868-1872; announcements of the deaths of the king's brother Albrecht von Preussen, 1872, and Queen Elisabeth Ludowika von Preussen, 1873; "Sedan-Feier" (Sedantag memorial celebration), 1873; program for the 25th anniversary of the king's reign, 1886; services upon the death of Kaiser Wilhelm I, 1888; announcement of the death of Kaiser Friedrich III, 1888; and services in honor of the birthday of Kaiser Wilhelm II, 1890-1891, 1895, 1897. One set of communal minutes/decisions, December 1896/February 1897, pertains to the renovation of the community meeting room, and the purchase of two portraits of Wilhelm II, and one of Friedrich III, to hang there. Occasional use of Hebrew phrases.

 
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Series IX: Financial records, 1834-1919

In German, with some Yiddish, and a few printed forms that are bilingual in German and Polish.
65 folders
Arrangement:

Arranged in the following subseries:

Scope and Content:

This series contains records related to the community's budget and finances. The first subseries comprises volumes of records organized and titled by the community council, including its correspondence with the government, and communal minutes and decisions, with related documents such as budgets, balance sheets, tax lists, and loan documents. The second subseries contains mainly account books and supporting financial documentation.

Please note that in the last folder of this series, which is also the last folder in the collection (Folder 178), is a fragment of an older inventory list, presumed to be from YIVO Vilna, which pertains to the collection as a whole, and is not intellectually part of any series (see the Arrangement note for further details).

Subseries 1: Financial correspondence and communal decisions, 1834-1915

In German, with some Yiddish, and one bilingual printed form in German and Polish.
20 folders
Arrangement:

Arranged generally in the order indicated from the community's labeling, in several groupings, beginning with records related to the communal budget and members' tax assessments, followed by groupings related to the preparation and audit of communal accounts; special taxes; and other specific financial matters. Within each grouping, the arrangement is roughly chronological.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains correspondence, and minutes and decisions of the community leadership related to communal finances, including the following four groupings: the communal budget and members' tax assessments (Folders 114-119), covering the periods 1843-1871 and 1891-1904; the preparation and audit of communal accounts (Folders 120-125), covering roughly the period 1834 to 1898, with scattered records as late as 1915; special taxes (Folders 126-130), dated 1834 to 1901; and other specific financial matters (Folders 131-133), 1833 to 1910. Included are budgets, balance sheets, tax lists, petitions, audit reports, and property and loan documents.

One of the files related to the communal taxes contains numerous petitions from individual community members (Folder 119); and one of the files concerning community accounts contains materials on a court case brought by the community against a former treasurer, Jacob Stahl, who had emigrated to the United States, in 1865 (Folder 123). Among the files pertaining to special taxes, one concerns a municipal "chimney tax" (Rauchfangsteuer; Folder 126) assessed on households, as well as communal buildings, in the 1830s to 1840s; and another concerns the military recruitment tax (Rekrutensteuer; Folder 127). Families could gain exemption from the latter if they had a son serving in the military; the tax was eliminated in Posen around 1846 as a result of a change in the law that made military service compulsory for Jews, the same as for the general population (which had already been the case in the rest of Prussia earlier on). Several files concern the kosher meat tax (Krupke, Krupkensteuer), in the period from 1845 to 1901 (Folders 128-130). At the end of the series, the files on other financial matters include one concerning a revision of property records (Folder 131), and two pertaining to loans taken out by the community in the late 19th century (Folders 132-133).

BoxFolderTitleDate
18 114 Repartitionen und Etat
Communal tax list and budget
1844
  

Communal budget signed by members of the representatives' assembly, with government approval and seal, dated from Posen. The title on the front of the folder implies that a communal tax list is included, but none was found. Also, an added note written below the title refers to a plan for the lower floor of the synagogue ("Grundriss des unteren Raumes der Synagoge zu Ostrowo"), and the same is also noted on the Vilna inventory list; however, no such item was found during the initial processing at the YIVO Institute in New York in the 1970s. Gathering of 4 leaves laid in a blue paper folder.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
19 115 Etats und Repartitionen (Fach 10, No. 3, Vol. III)
Budgets and communal tax lists
1843-1860
  

Correspondence with the government, communal minutes/decisions, budgets, and communal tax lists (Heberolle/Repartition). Roughly but not completely chronological. Includes budgets covering 1847-1862, with specific items labeled (in order of first occurrence): 1847/1849, 1850/1852, 1846/1848, 1851/1853, 1854/1856, 1857/1859, 1860/1862. Annual tax lists (in order of occurrence): 1847-1850, 1852-1853, 1845, 1843, 1846, 1844, 1851, 1857, 1858. The budget for 1857/1859 has a gathering of supporting documents (Beläge) labeled A to E, one of which (D) is a contract with Julius Gross for kosher meat tax collection for 1856/1857. Later, there is another such contract with Heimann Krauskopf for 1860. Preceding the tax list for 1843 is a chart of tax rates (Klassifications-Tarif), both items dated February 1843. Tax lists are typically signed by the appraisal committee (Einschätzungs-Commission).

 
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19 116 Die Feststellung des Klassifikations-Tarifs zur Veranlagung der Gemeinde-Steuern (Fach 10, No. 5)
Determination of tax rate classes for assessment of communal taxes
1857-1859, 1867-1871
  

Communal minutes/decisions, correspondence with the government, draft of new tax assessment system (Regulativ), and meeting notices. Includes charts of tax rates (Klassifikations-Tarif) dated 1857, 1858, 1859, and 1867. The draft of the new system is submitted to the executive by David Goldstein, dated April 1868, and an official version, along with a tax rate chart, is approved by the community and submitted to the government in July 1868.

 
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19 117 Die Veranlagung der Korporations-Beiträge (Fach 10, No. 7, Vol. IV)
Assessment of communal tax contributions
1860-1870
  

Communal tax lists, correspondence with the government, government orders, communal minutes/decisions, petitions, and meeting notices. Includes annual tax lists for 1860-1865, 1867-1870. Includes the following petitions: In 1861, Salim Gerstmann, concerning his son Siegmund Gerstmann, Dresden. In 1862: J. Jacobi, as well as petitions recorded in the minutes, from Abraham Simon, Moritz Kaplan, Herrmann Markiewicz, Moses Loebel Blaschker, and Jacob Berger. In 1865: Isidor Liebes. In 1869: Hermann Goldenring. In 1870: Josef Goldenring, Simon Czapski, Baer Fischel (recorded in the minutes), and Iselin Priebatsch (writing from Breslau). With Gerstmann's petition is a printed form conveying tax assessment information, filled in for his son, and signed by treasurer Jacob Stahl, January 1861. The appraisal committee (Einschätzungs-Commission) produced many of these records, including the tax lists, which are signed by its members; the committee was chaired by Moritz Wehlau, from 1860 to 1866 (while he was community executive chair), and by Abraham Cohn, beginning in 1867. Some signatures in Yiddish.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
20 118 Die Repartition der Corporationsbeiträge (Fach 10, No. 8, Vol. III)
Tax lists for communal tax contributions
1891-1904
  

Communal tax lists, communal minutes/decisions, correspondence with the government, excerpts from the government tax lists of new arrivals (Staats-Einkommensteuer-Zugangsliste) pertaining to the Ostrowo Jewish community, draft budgets with lists of back contributions owed, correspondence with community members, and one meeting notice (April 1898). Includes tax lists for 1891/1892 to 1903/1904, and draft budgets (Voranschlag zum Etat) for 1895/1898, 1900/1901, and 1899/1900. Includes the following pertaining to individual community members: Printed form (Steuerzettel; laid in) conveying tax assessment information for Jacob Lindenstrauss, signed by treasurer Josephi, March 1894. Letter from Cäcilie Gross, September 1899, concerning move to Posen. Letter to Cäcilie Rosenthal, October 1903, concerning adjustment of her tax assessment.

 
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20 119 Reclamationen wegen Korporations-Beiträgen (Fach 11, No. 3)
Complaints concerning communal tax contributions
1835-1861
  

Petitions, communal minutes/decisions, correspondence with the government, and meeting notices. Beginning in 1847 much of the correspondence, minutes, and meeting notices pertain to a special committee charged with reviewing the petitions (Reklamations-Commission; Ermässigungs-Commission). Includes two printed forms, one pertaining to the community tax assessment for Marcus Manheim, March 1856, signed by chair M. Cohn Baum, and one for quarterly municipal tax payments for Isidor Berlin, December 1860; the latter form is bilingual in German and Polish, with the German version used. Family names that occur among the petitioners include, in 1835-1850: Berliner, Bloch, Brandt, Brieger, Brods, Buchwald, Burgheim, Callomon, Cohn, Fischel, Fraenkel, Fuchs, Gallewski, Gerstmann, Goldman, Hirsch, Hoff, Holschaus, Holzmann, Horwitz, Kaiser, Katz, Kleinert, Korn, Kozminski, Krotoschiner/Krotoszyner, Labeschiner, Lamm, Landau, Ledermann, Lewek, Lissner, Löwenthal, Marcus, Mendel, Mueller, Munk, Prinz, Pulvermann, Schachtel, Seidel, Seidenberg, Silberman, Silberstein, Simon, Stahl, Stern, Strusbach, Teichmann, Warschoski, Weissbein, Wiener, Wislicki, and Zuckermann. In 1852-1861: Apt, Bergmann, Berliner, Brieger, Cohn, Cohn Baum, Feiertag, Friedländer, Gerstmann, Glaser, Goldenring, Grabowski, Guttmann, Hoff, Jacobsohn, Josefowitz, Lamm, Landau, Liebes, Landé, Loewenstein, Mamlok, Marcus, Moskiewicz, Munk, Pfeffermann, Pilz, Prager, Priebatsch, Pulvermann, Seidel, Silberstein, Soberski, Spiro, Stillschweig, Teichmann, Trieber, Wehlau, and Wiener. Volume is exceptionally bulky, approximately 2.5 inches thick. Some signatures in Yiddish.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
21 120 Kassen und Rechnungs-Sachen (Fach 12, No. 2, Vol. III)
Matters of the community treasury and financial accounts
1834-1846
  

Communal minutes/decisions, correspondence with the government and internally, petitions, invoices, and receipts. Concerns the preparation and audit of communal accounts, with some items detailing expenses or related to compensation or payment requested, or due. Specific topics/items include: Appointment of a committee in charge of auditing the accounts. Requests for payment or reimbursement, for work performed, or money advanced. Correspondence with printer B. L. Monasch, Krotoszin, 1837, 1841, 1844, concerning orders. Issues regarding individuals' payments for naturalization patents, 1838. List of back payments due related to the building of the school house, 1843. In 1837 petitions from Israel Klapper, Joseph Kraus, and Louis Zellner, for various compensation, make reference to a recent outbreak of cholera. The audit committee members appointed in 1835 were Abraham Rosenthal, Baruch Krotoschiner, Baruch Bloch, and Aron Zellner; in March 1843, Nathan Lewi, Abraham Pulvermann, and Joachim Liebes. The treasurer in 1842-1843 was M. Wiener, succeeded by Jacob Stahl. One item, as well as some signatures, in Yiddish.

 
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21 121 Kassen und Rechnungs-Sachen (Fach 12, No. 3, Vol. II)
Matters of the community treasury and financial accounts
1844-1886
  

Communal minutes/decisions, correspondence with the government and internally, balance sheets, audit remarks with treasurers' responses, petitions, and invoices/receipts. Concerns the preparation and audit of communal accounts, with some items detailing expenses, or documenting compensation or payment requested, or due. Specific items include: balance sheets for the years 1851, 1853, 1855, 1858, 1859, 1861, 1862, 1865, 1866, 1867, 1868, 1869, 1870, 1871, 1872, 1873, 1874, 1879/1880, 1880/1881 (two half-year statements), 1881/1882, 1882/1883, 1883/1884, 1884/1885 (with separate statements detailing income and expenses, respectively, in the period 1871 to 1880). Summary statement covering three tax periods, 1876-1879. Lists of back taxes paid, from 1881/1882. The treasurers and their approximate terms are: Moritz Pulvermann, 1845-1846; Louis Hellinger, 1847-1855; Jacob Stahl, 1855-1865; David Goldstein, 1865-1875; M. Rothstein, circa 1880; and M. Berliner, 1881-1886. Heads of the audit committee and approximate start of their terms: Isidor Krotoszyner, 1861; Abraham Cohn, 1865; L. Zellner, 1870; S. Moskiewicz, 1872; and Arnold Pilz, 1880. Volume is exceptionally bulky, approximately 2.5 inches thick.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
22 122 Die Revision der Korporations-Kasse (Fach 12, No. 4)
Audit of the community treasury
1836, 1838, 1844-1873, 1879-1881, 1886-1892
  

Communal minutes/decisions, summary financial reports by audit committee, and correspondence with the government and internally. Topics include: selection of treasurer, and setting of bond (Caution) to be posted by treasurer, 1846-1847, and selection of representatives to be members of the audit committee. The periodic audit of the community treasury is typically carried out by a committee consisting of the community executive chair (Vorsteher), or another member of the executive in his place, and two designated members of the representatives' assembly; the committee's periodic reports (sometimes monthly) present a summary of income and expenses, and cash on hand. Some reports evidently missing. Also included: the community's response, January 1862, to a complaint lodged by Abraham Cohn in fall 1861, concerning the community's plan for debt repayment (Schuldentilgungsplan), related to the budgets of 1860/1862; and a resignation letter of treasurer Goldstein, March 1866 (evidently not accepted, since he continues as treasurer).

 
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22 123 Die Korporations-Kassen-Rechnungen pro 1863 und 1864 (Fach 12, No. 5)
Accounts of the community treasury for 1863/1864
1862, 1865-1867
  

Communal minutes/decisions, correspondence with the government and internally, and balance sheet for year 1863. Concerns, in part, a legal case of the Ostrowo community against the former treasurer Jacob Stahl, related to the reconciliation of the accounts for 1863/1864, following Stahl's departure from Ostrowo, first for Berlin, and, shortly later, for the United States, in fall 1865. The new treasurer David Goldstein subsequently assumed responsibility for those accounts. Included are statements and petitions from Rosalie Stahl, Jacob's wife, who, together with their children, was still in Ostrowo (f. 29-30, 36, 42-43), and a petition on the family's behalf addressed to the community executive, signed by over 50 community members (f. 51-52). The first Item, dated January 1862 (f. 1-2), stems from before the Stahl case, being a response to a complaint from Abraham Cohn in fall 1861, concerning the community's debt repayment plan; it is a draft of a document found in Folder 122. Leaves of the volume are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 75.

 
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22 124 Einziehung rückständiger Beiträge und Korporations Kassen-Rechnung (Fach 12, No. 6)
Collection of contributions in arrears; accounts of the community treasury
1880-1886, 1891-1898, 1902
  

Communal minutes/decisions, lists of members behind in their communal contributions (Restliste rückständiger Abgaben), correspondence with the government and internally, documents related to legal proceedings to collect back taxes, balance sheets, audit reports, petitions from and correspondence with members, and notices to individuals about deferrals/extensions or back taxes owed. Includes communal balance sheets for the years 1885/1886, 1886/1887, 1887/1888, 1888/1889, 1889/1890 (excerpt), and 1890/1891. Treasurers in this period were Moritz Berliner, until fall 1890, succeeded by Salo Josephi. Audit reports signed by S. Spiro and another member in 1886; by the community executive, under J. Landé, in 1888; by Arnold Pilz and Gerson Peiser in 1890; and by Pilz and S. Unger in 1894.

 
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22 125 Die Jahresrechnungen der Korporations-Kasse (Fach 12, No. 7, Vol. II)
Annual financial statements of the community treasury
1913-1915
  

Balance sheet for year 1910/1911, including separate balance sheet for the endowment fund (Legatenfond), by treasurer J. Fabisch, 1913; communal minutes/decision, with report of executive member Martin Pilz, 1913; and report on the audit of the community treasury, 1915. 14 leaves.

 
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22 126 Die Rauchfangs-Steuer der hiesigen Corporation (Litt. R, No. 49)
Chimney tax of the Ostrowo Jewish community
1834-1836, 1842
  

Correspondence with the government, 1834-1836, 1842; excerpt of Ostrowo taxpayer list pertaining to the Jewish community, 1834; communal minutes/decision, 1834; and municipal announcement, 1842. Concerns a tax assessed on households according to the presence of a chimney. In the taxpayer list community members are listed according to house number. Gathering of 7 leaves.

 
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22 127 Die Umlegung der Rekrutensteuer/ Acta der Repräsentanten-Versammlung
Recruitment tax reapportionment/ Records of the representatives' assembly
1837-1845
  

Correspondence with the government, and internally; communal minutes/decisions; meeting notices; and notes on amounts paid for military recruitment tax by the communities in Adelnau county (Adelnau, Ostrowo, Raszkow, and Sulmierzyce) in 1837-1840. Includes a petition of the representatives' assembly to the government in Posen, July 1837, concerning the level of the tax and the distribution of the burden among the communities in Adelnau county (Kreis). A recurring topic is the selection of a delegate of the community to travel to Posen in the matter of the apportionment of the tax (Jacob Wehlau, August 1838; Samuel Gerstmann, July 1840), and provision for travel expenses. 25 leaves.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
23 128 Die Krupken-Abgabe, Verpachtung der diesfälligen Revenue (Fach 14, No. 2, Vol. II)
Kosher meat tax; leasing of the revenue collection
1845-1860
  

Communal minutes/decisions, including auctions of lease for kosher meat tax collection; terms for the leasing of the tax-collecting function (Bedingungen zur Verpachtung der Krupke), including copies signed as contracts with individual leaseholders; correspondence with the government, and internally, including notes and receipts from treasurers (Hellinger, Stahl); correspondence or petitions from leaseholders, and others; announcements; and meeting notices. Among items of correspondence is a letter from the Jewish community of Raszkow, concerning issues related to the regulation of the kosher meat tax in the two communities, April 1852. Also included are two statements regarding revenue from tax slips (Nachweisung der verausgabten Krupke-Billeten): in 1848, monthly totals; in 1849, totals approximately biweekly, along with breakdown of number of tickets for each type of meat. Holders of tax-collecting leases (Krupken-Pächter) represented: Kasriel Lewy for year 1846; Julius Gross, 1847; Michael Marcus and son Loebel Marcus, 1848; Heimann Krauskopf, 1859, 1860. In 1860, notes from several members declaring their bids for the tax farm. Several announcements bilingual, in German and Yiddish, circa 1845-1848. Laid in at back are a number of small receipts for payment of kosher meat tax per portion of poultry or beef (Schlachtzettel), some embossed with the name Israel Horwitz and signed by community executive Abraham Cohn, others with stamps indicating receipt of the tax by the community treasury.

 
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23 129 Die Feststellung und Erhebung der Krupkensteuer und Schlachtgebühren (Fach 14, No. 3, Vol. II)
Determination and collection of the kosher meat tax and slaughtering fees
1876-1894
  

Communal minutes/decisions, including documentation of auctions of the lease for kosher meat tax collection; petitions/complaints; correspondence, internally and with leaseholders or bidders, as well as other communities; statements of the terms (Bedingungen) for leasing (Verpachtung) of the kosher meat tax collection; guidelines (Anweisung) for the tax collection; annual statements of revenue from the tax; announcements of auctions; bids for the tax farm; and meeting notices. The revenue statements, dated 1877-1879, give income by month, broken down according to type of meat. Among the petitions: butchers concerning an increase in fees, 1877 (f. 19-20); community members, 1879, protesting the holding of the tax farm by the same person three years running (f. 35-36); Jewish butchers' complaint, 1880, about meat being brought from out of town (f. 51-52); various petitions for reduction or waiver of slaughter fee, including butchers from other towns (Raszkow, f. 56; Demnica, f. 57) who come to Ostrowo for slaughtering. One document in 1886 sets forth principles for securing the income from the kosher meat tax (Grundsätze zur Sicherstellung der Einnahmen aus der Krupkensteuer; f. 79-80). Included is correspondence with the following Jewish communities: Jaroschin, 1883 (f. 54); Myslowitz, 1885 (f. 58); and Krotoschin, January 1891. Leaseholders represented include: Salomon Goldberg, 1877-1879; Alexander Schloss, 1888, 1890-1891; Gabriel Bergmann, 1889; Isidor Skaller, 1893; and Isidor Bialecki, 1894. The leaves in approximately the first two-fifths of the volume are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 102.

 
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23 130 Kosher meat tax collection 1900-1901
  

Loose documents (2 items), found laid in the previous volume (Folder 129). Includes a document setting out terms for the leasing of the kosher meat tax collection, dated December 1900, and a communication from the community executive to the representatives' assembly, comprising a cover letter, dated February 1901, and two enclosures from Rabbi Freund. The enclosures consist of an attestation by the rabbi, dated February 1901, and an accompanying set of guidelines for the tax collection (Anweisung für die Erhebung der Krupkensteuer), dated January 1901. In the attestation, the rabbi states that he had a meeting with the kosher meat tax collector, Fabisch, and cantor/shochet Abramowitz, and read them the guidelines; the document is signed by the rabbi and the two officials.

 
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23 131 Die Berichtigung der Forderung des Provinzial Schul-Fonds (Fach 15, No. 1)
Revision of the claim of the Provincial School Fund
1833-1846, 1869-1870
  

Correspondence with the government, including court documents; copies of official documents, including the community's 1724 charter; and community minutes/decisions. Concerns a revision of the community's property records in 1869, pertaining to four lots (no. 42, 36, 43, and 44) that were put to different uses over time; and a related acknowledgement, dated 1869, of monies paid by the community to the provincial school fund in the years 1837 to 1847, in settlement of a claim of the Provincial School Fund against the community in the early 1830s.

 
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23 132 Die Entnahme des Darlehens aus dem Legatenfond (Fach 15, No. 9)
Loan from the endowment fund
1878, 1898-1904
  

Correspondence with the government and others, communal minutes/decisions, amortization tables, excerpts from the municipal land registry, copies of stipulations on use of bequests (f. 32-63), lists of bequests to be used toward the building fund (f. 77-78, 80-81), and statement of income and expenses for the building fund (f. 100-103). Concerns loan needed to support building projects, mainly renovations of the synagogue, mikveh, and cemetery/mortuary. Correspondents include the Schlesische Boden-Credit-Actien-Bank (Silesian Land Credit Bank Incorporated), 1878, 1897-1898, and the Posen provincial loan fund, 1898. The following family names occur in the references to bequests or gifts: Cohn, Cohn Baum, Fraenkel, Gallewski, Landau, Grabowski, Guttmann, Hirsch, Holzmann, Jaraczewer, Moskiewicz, Müller, Pfeffermann, Salzmann, Silber, Skaller, Warschauer, Zuckermann. The leaves of the volume are numbered, in blue pencil, out of sequence, as follows: 1 -31, 64-65, 87, 91, 90, 92-93, 66-71, 32-63, 72-81, 84, 83, 85-86, 94-104, 82.

 
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23 133 Die Aufnahme eines Darlehens bei der Chevra Kadischa und der Preussischen Central-Bodenkredit-Aktien-Gesellschaft, Berlin (Fach 15, No. 10, Vol. 1)
Loan from the Chevra Kadischa and the Prussian Central Land Credit Corporation, Berlin
1872-1873, 1907-1910
  

Correspondence with the government and with banks, excerpts from municipal land registry and from government records pertaining to building taxes, and communal minutes/decisions. Correspondence from the Schlesische Boden-Credit-Actien-Bank includes letter, 1909, acknowledging the completion of payments on a loan of 8,000 Marks, enclosing original loan documents dated 1872-1873. Correspondence with the Preussische Central-Bodencredit-Aktiengesellschaft, 1909, pertains to a new loan of 22,000 Marks, including receipts for two quarterly interest payments in 1909-1910. 50 leaves.

 
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Subseries 2: Account books and supporting financial documents, 1836-1852, 1867-1905, 1917-1919

Predominantly in German, with some Yiddish, occasional use of Hebrew in one volume, and two bilingual printed forms in German and Polish.
44 folders
Arrangement:

Arranged chronologically.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains financial records such as ledgers, journals, logbooks, and booklets of supporting documentation for income (orders to register income) and expenses (pay orders, invoices, receipts). The volumes documenting expenses also include copies of communal decisions and occasional fliers from organizations. Most of these records would have been kept by the community treasurer; two items are logbooks for the community slaughterhouse (Folders 136-137).

In the volumes of supporting documents (Belege/Beläge) pertaining to income or expenses for a given year, the items are typically numbered, and these numbers would have been referenced in the corresponding financial statement; however, these volumes generally do not contain any summary or overview, and the corresponding financial statements are not found in the collection. The materials pertaining to the accounts for the year 1839 form an exception: Folder 138 contains the financial statement (Rechnung) for that year, with numbered references to supporting documents; and Folder 139 contains a portion of the corresponding numbered supporting documents for expenses. Similarly, two volumes related to income and expenses for 1867 (Folders 146 and 147, respectively) include overviews, with numbered references to corresponding supporting documents, which are contained in the same volume.

The volume concerning the accounts for 1842 (Folder 141), the bulk of which comprises financial supporting documents, also contains documents more like those found in Subseries IX.1, including a budget and a communal tax list, both signed by the representatives' assembly, and accompanied by a few notes signed by the community executive, S. Gerstmann, regarding tax assessments. Complete or partial communal tax lists in the period 1896 to 1899 are found in Folder 166.

Several volumes of financial records that pertain solely to charitable aid have been incorporated into Series IV, Charitable aid, since they include information about recipients of aid, and a few petitions from individuals; see: Folders 51-52 and 55 (containing supporting documents for expenses, for 1862, 1865, and 1879, respectively), and Folder 56 (a cashbook for 1879-1887).

BoxFolderTitleDate
24 134 Einnahme-Manual der israelitischen Corporations-Casse zu Ostrowo pro 1836
Income ledger of the treasury of the Jewish community of Ostrowo for 1836
1836
  

Contains monthly summaries of income, in the following categories: communal tax contributions; military recruitment tax from Raszkow, Adelnau, and Sulmierzyce; income from the shochet Rabbi Holzmann (Schächter-Einnahme); wedding fees; back payments from previous year; kosher meat tax; school contribution (Beitrag zum Schulfond); mikveh contributions (Tauchenbeiträge); and miscellaneous expenses (Extraordinaria). 12 leaves. Also included is a separate blank booklet (gathering of 4 leaves) for recording income (title page: Anweise-Buch ... über die Einnahme), dated 1836, with no entries.

 
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24 135 Einnahme-Journal der israelitischen Corporations-Casse zu Ostrowo pro 1838
Income journal of the treasury of the Jewish community of Ostrowo for 1838
1838
  

Cashbook/journal with dated entries (October 26 to December 21) for sums received, name of payer, reason for the payment, and amount. The types of income recorded appear to be mainly communal tax payments for certain periods of the year, or back payments, as well as wedding fees, burial fees, bond (Caution) for ritual meat tax, and back payments related to the mikveh (Tauchenrest), with a total of 146 entries. Gathering of 6 leaves.

 
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24 136 Slaughterhouse log book
1838
  

Covers January to September. Lists date, community member name, tallies in several columns for types of poultry, and monetary amount. Also found laid in the volume is a fragment of a (draft) letter in Yiddish, dated July 1838, addressed to Bertha Cohn, Breslau. 21 leaves.

 
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24 137 Slaughterhouse log book
1838-1839
  

Appears to cover November 1838 to January 1839. Lists day of the week, date, community member name, and tallies in several columns for types of animal, including ox, calf, and poultry. 17 leaves. In Yiddish.

 
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24 138 Rechnung der Israelitischen Corporations-Kasse zu Ostrowo für den Jahrgang 1839
Financial statement of the Jewish community of Ostrowo for the year 1839
1840
  

Includes itemization, with members' names, in income categories such as wedding fees, and expenses for charitable aid. Signed by treasurer Moses H. Cohn and submitted to the community executive August 13, 1840. The leaves of the volume are numbered, in red pencil, 1 to 17.

 
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24 139 Supporting documents for expenses, for 1839 (partial)
1839
  

Supporting documents numbered 251 to 348, corresponding to slightly less than the final one third of the total 348 supporting documents for expenses enumerated in the financial statement for 1839 given in the booklet in Folder 138. The items comprise pay orders (Ausgabe-Anweisung), invoices, receipts, communal decisions, and one statement of amounts paid for military recruitment tax. The documentation pertains to expenses in the following categories (as given in the financial statement): aid to the poor; military recruitment tax; and miscellaneous expenses (unvorhergesehene Faelle). The latter category (itemized in the statement) includes such expenses as postage, fees, or travel costs for specific individuals; a wedding gift for the rabbi's daughter; repairs to rabbi's residence; and renovation of the synagogue. The pay order typically authorizes treasurer Moses Cohn to make the payment, and is signed by community chair Aron Berliner, and/or other members of the executive body, as well as by the recipient of the amount.

 
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24 140 Restenliste der Communal Abgaben pro 1840
List of communal tax contributions in arrears for 1840
1840
  

Lists of members owing back payments, including communal taxes (Communal-Abgaben) and privileges (Ehrenrechte). Gathering of 4 leaves.

 
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24 141 Accounts for 1842 (Fach 40, No. 2)
1842
  

Budget, lists related to back taxes owed, communal tax list, and supporting documents for income and expenses. The budget, dated January 1842, is followed by several lists concerning back taxes or other outstanding debts (Resten-Liste) from 1840 to 1841, signed by treasurer Mannheim Wiener; the communal tax list (Repartition) for 1842; and orders to the treasurer to register income (Einnahme-Anweisung), numbered 1 to 18, related to community members' payment of debts. The expenses portion of the volume begins with a separate title page (Ausgabe Beläge pro 1842). The documents related to expenses, numbered 1 to 288, generally comprise pay orders, with an occasional invoice or separate receipt, and one petition (f. 288). Bound, with no covers. Some signatures in Yiddish.

 
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24 142 Anweise-Buch der Verwaltungs-Beamten der israelitischen Corporation zu Ostrowo über die Ausgabe der isr. Corporations-Casse
Expenditures journal of the administrative officers of the Jewish community of Ostrowo, pertaining to the Jewish community of Ostrowo treasury, for the year 1842
1842-1846
  

Cashbook/journal with dated entries for sums disbursed, name of payee, reason for the payment, and amount. There are no totals. The last page contains notes related to a budget for 1846/47 and 1848, giving some summary figures for income and expenses for the years 1843 to 1845. Gathering of 8 leaves.

 
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24 143 Anweise-Buch über die Einnahmen der israelitischen Corporations-Casse zu Ostrowo pro 1843
Income journal of the treasury of the Jewish community of Ostrowo for 1843
1843
  

Cashbook/journal with dated entries for sums received, name of payer, reason for the payment, and amount. A total of 42 entries, most often for ritual meat tax (Krupke) and wedding fees. Gathering of 4 leaves (last two blank).

 
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24 144 Supporting documents for expenses (partial), for 1844
1844
  

Invoices, receipts, and pay orders. Dates span only January to May. The items are numbered, in brown ink, 1 to 159 (in reverse order). Two notes and some signatures in Yiddish. Bound, with no covers.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
25 145 Ausgabe Belege zur Korporations Kassen Rechnung pro 1851: 73 Stück von N. 1 bis 72
Supporting documents for expenses, for the financial statement of the treasury of the Jewish community of Ostrowo, for 1851: 73 items, no. 1 to 72
1851-1852
  

Invoices, receipts, pay orders, and communal decisions. Includes petitions from Ephraim Suchman (no. 53) and S. L. Bloch (no. 55). One item (no. 61) includes copies of communal decisions dated 1850-1851, related to the return of a security deposit to the heirs of former mikveh lease holder J. H. Müller. Items are numbered, in blue ink, no. 1 to 72.

 
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25 146 Einnahme Beläge zur Rechnung der Synagogen-Gemeinde-Kasse zu Ostrowo pro 1867
Supporting documents for income, for the financial statement of the treasury of the Jewish community of Ostrowo, for 1867
1867
  

Overviews of income (f. 1-2, 10, 21, 33, 163), interspersed with supporting documents, including communal decisions, correspondence with the government, and orders to the treasurer to register income (Einnahme-Anweisungen). The correspondence mostly concerns approval of departure payments (Ablösungsgeld) to be made by members moving away. Includes a rental contract with Aron Mueller as superintendant of the mikveh (f. 14-15). The leaves of the volume are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 163.

 
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25 147 Ausgabe Belaege zur Rechnung der Synagogen-Gemeinde-Kasse zu Ostrowo pro 1867
Supporting documents for expenses, for the financial statement of the treasury of the Jewish community of Ostrowo, for 1867
1867
  

Overview of expenses by budget category (Nachweis), followed by supporting documents no. 1 to 283 (no. 139 to 141 missing). The latter comprise pay orders, invoices, receipts, and community minutes/decisions. Includes a contract with master bricklayer Moritz Landé for renovation of the mikveh (no. 95); a copy of a contract with Henriette Cohn for the community's purchase of the brick manufacturing firm (Ziegelei) Heimann Cohn (no. 103); and a copy of a contract (dated 1856) with Julius Leser and wife Rochel (née Schildberger) for the community's purchase of property at no. 35 in the Jewish quarter (no. 137-138). Several items (no. 242-254) pertain to attorney and court fees in the court case of the community v. Krauskopf (see Folder 99). Two receipts from the Ostrowo court (no. 243 and 244) are on printed forms that are bilingual, with the German portion used, and the blank Polish version on the verso.

 
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25 148 Ausgabe Beläge zur Rechnung der Synagogen-Gemeinde-Kasse zu Ostrowo pro 1871
Supporting documents for expenses, for the financial statement of the treasury of the Jewish community of Ostrowo, for 1871
1871
  

Invoices, receipts, pay orders, and communal decisions. Includes a petition from Moses Scheyer (f. 228) for an honorarium; and statement of postage costs for the year (Porto-Auslagen; f. 457-458), with details about addressees of letters. The leaves of the volume are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 472.

 
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26 149 Einnahme Beläge zur Rechnung der Synagogen-Gemeinde-Kasse zu Ostrowo für das Jahr 1873
Supporting documents for income, for the financial statement of the treasury of the Jewish community of Ostrowo, for 1873
1873
  

Communal decisions and orders to register income. Includes weekly orders to register income collected for privileges (Ehrenrechte) associated with Torah readings in the synagogue, on specially printed forms (Einnahme-Anweisung über Ehrenrechtsgefälle; no. 20-80). The items are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 112.

 
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26 150 Ausgabe Beläge zur Rechnung der Synagogen-Gemeinde-Kasse zu Ostrowo für das Jahr 1873
Supporting documents for expenses, for the financial statement of the treasury of the Jewish community of Ostrowo, for 1873
1873
  

Invoices, receipts, pay orders, and communal decisions. Includes a newspaper clipping (attached to invoice) advertising a vacancy for an assistant cantor and shochet, published in the Allgemeine Zeitung des Judenthums (no. 302); and petitions from Karl Schoschnik, mikveh attendant (no. 312-313), and Samuel Ostrower (no. 315). The items are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 322.

 
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26 151 Einnahme Beläge zur Rechnung der Synagogen-Gemeinde-Kasse zu Ostrowo pro 1874
Supporting documents for income, for the financial statement of the treasury of the Jewish community of Ostrowo, for 1874
1873-1874
  

Orders to register income, supplement to the communal tax list (Nachtrag zur Heberolle) reflecting changes in tax status of some members, and communal decisions. Includes several decisions regarding decreases in communal taxes for certain members. Also includes weekly orders to register income collected for privileges (Ehrenrechte) associated with Torah readings in the synagogue, on specially printed forms (Einnahme-Anweisung über Ehrenrechtsgefälle; no. 20-76). Front cover detached.

 
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26 152 Ausgabe Beläge zur Rechnung der Synagogen-Gemeinde-Kasse zu Ostrowo pro 1874
Supporting documents for expenses, for the financial statement of the treasury of the Jewish community of Ostrowo, for 1874
1873-1874
  

Invoices, receipts, pay orders, and communal decisions. Includes an itemized statement of petty cash for the year (Auslagen-Konto), with details such as addressees of letters (no. 19); and copies of communal decisions concerning the resignation of Carl Schoschnik as mikveh attendant and the hiring of August Schoschnik (no. 57) and monetary bonuses to be paid to religious employees at Passover time (no. 298). Items are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 339. Covers detached.

 
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26 153 Einnahme Belaege der Synagogen-Gemeinde-Kassse zu Ostrowo für das Semester October 1880 bis 1 April 1881
Supporting documents for income, of the treasury of the Jewish community of Ostrowo, for the term October 1880 to 1 April 1881
1880-1881
  

Supporting documents for the second half of the fiscal year, comprising orders to register income, and one statement for collection of the kosher meat tax. The latter reports the weekly revenue collected by D. Goldberg, broken down according to type of meat (no. 1). Includes weekly orders to register income collected for privileges (Ehrenrechte) associated with Torah readings in the synagogue, on specially printed forms (Einnahme-Anweisung über Ehrenrechtsgefälle; no. 2-26). The items are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 34.

 
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26 154 Ausgabe Journal der Synagogen-Gemeinde-Kassse vom 1ten April 1881 bis 31ten Maerz 1882
Expenditures journal of the treasury of the Jewish community of Ostrowo from the 1st April 1881 to the 31st March 1882
1881-1882
  

Cashbook/journal, with entries made on a printed form spanning facing pages, including a table allowing classification of each entry into a specified budget category. There are running totals on each page, by category and overall. The categories are: general administrative costs; salaries; construction and repair; administration of the mikveh (Badeanstalt); administration of the cemetery; synagogue and religious life (Synagogen- und Kultus-Bedürfnisse); debt repayment (Schulden-Tilgung); charitable aid fund (Zum Armenfonds) and miscellaneous charitable expenses (ausserordentliche Unterstützungen); miscellaneous expenses (unvorhergesehene Ausgaben); and advances and ongoing expenses (Vorschussweise und durchlaufende Ausgaben). 12 leaves.

 
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26 155 Einnahme Belaege der Synagogen-Gemeinde-Kassse zu Ostrowo 1882/83
Supporting documents for income, of the treasury of the Jewish community of Ostrowo for 1882/83
1882-1883
  

Orders to register income, statements of income, and communal decisions. Includes statement of weekly kosher meat tax revenue collected by D. Goldberg, broken down according to type of meat (no. 1); statement of synagogue seat rental income, with members' names and seat locations (no. 72); and weekly orders to register income collected for privileges (Ehrenrechte) associated with Torah readings in the synagogue, on specially printed forms (Einnahme-Anweisung über Ehrenrechtsgefälle; no. 3-56). The items are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 72.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
27 156 Ausgabe Belaege der Synagogen-Gemeinde-Kassse zu Ostrowo 1882/83
Supporting documents for expenses, of the treasury of the Jewish community of Ostrowo, for 1882/83
1882-1883
  

Invoices, pay orders, and receipts. Of the documents pertaining to charitable aid (no. 117-139), some are for amounts given to individuals, including Jews from Russia; one is a petition from Rabbi Freimann on behalf of a family in need of rent money (no. 138). The items are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 140; and one additional item (presumably no. 141) is fragmentary. Some Yiddish signatures.

 
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27 157 Einnahme Belaege der Synagogen Gemeinde Kasse zu Ostrowo 1883/84
Supporting documents for income, of the treasury of the Jewish community of Ostrowo, for 1883/84
1883-1884
  

Orders to register income, statement of ritual meat tax collected (D. Goldberg), and statement of rental of synagogue seats (including list of seat holders). Included are weekly orders to register income collected for privileges (Ehrenrechte) associated with Torah readings in the synagogue (no. 3-52). The items are numbered, in blue pencil 1 to 82.

 
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27 158 Einnahme Belaege für das Rechnungsjahr 1884/85
Supporting documents for income, for financial year 1884/85
1884-1885
  

Orders to register income, and statements of income. Includes statement of weekly kosher meat tax revenue collected by D. Goldberg, broken down according to type of meat (no. 1); statement of synagogue seat rental income, with members' names and seat locations (no. 2); weekly orders to register income collected for privileges (Ehrenrechte) associated with Torah readings in the synagogue, on specially printed forms (Einnahme-Anweisung über Ehrenrechtsgefälle; no. 3-53); copy of correspondence to Moritz Liebes concerning his purchase of a grave (no. 59); and statement of kosher meat tax revenue collected by Hirsch Eisenstein (no. 73) for the sale of kosher meat brought into town from other localities (attached slips pertain to meat brought from Raszkow and Adelnau). The items are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 73.

 
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27 159 Ausgabe Belaege zur Synagogen-Gemeinde-Kasse zu Ostrowo pro 1885/86
Supporting documents for expenses, of the treasury of the Jewish community of Ostrowo, for 1885/86
1885-1886
  

Invoices, receipts, pay orders, and communal decisions. Copies of communal decisions (six leaves) laid in at front, related to adjustments in tax assessments, evidently comprise documentation item no. 1; and the following items are numbered, in blue pencil, 2 to 202. Includes a newspaper clipping (attached to invoice) of an obituary notice for Louis Hellinger (no. 169), published in the Breslauer Zeitung, July 1885.

 
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27 160 Einnahme Belaege 1886/87
Supporting documents for income, for 1886/87
1886-1887
  

Orders to register income, statement of ritual meat tax collected (D. Goldberg), and statement of rental of synagogue seats (including list of seat holders). Included are weekly orders to register income collected for privileges (Ehrenrechte) associated with Torah readings in the synagogue (no. 3-53). The items are numbered, in blue pencil 1 to 69.

 
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27 161 Ausgabe Beläge der Synagogen-Gemeinde-Kassse zu Ostrowo pro 1889/90
Supporting documents for expenses, of the treasury of the Jewish community of Ostrowo, for 1889/90
1889-1890
  

Invoices, receipts, pay orders, and communal decisions. The items are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 144.

 
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BoxFolderTitleDate
28 162 Income journal of the treasury of the Jewish community of Ostrowo for 1890/1891
1890-1891
  

Cashbook/journal, with entries made on a printed form spanning facing pages, including a table allowing classification of each entry as to type of income; monthly totals in each category; cumulative totals; and, on the last page, totals for the fiscal year, minus total expenditures, and overall balance, signed by the chair of the community executive, David Goldstein, April 1891. The income categories are: back payments from previous years; direct tax; ritual meat tax (Krupken-Steuer); rent from communal houses; rent from synagogue seats; payments for privileges (Ehrenrechte); fees for graves; miscellaneous income; and advances/repayments/regularly expected income (durchlaufende Einnahmen). Gathering of 8 leaves, with no covers.

 
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28 163 Ausgabe Beläge pro 1894/1895
Supporting documents for expenses, for 1894/1895
1894-1895
  

Invoices, receipts, and pay orders. The items are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 147.

 
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28 164 Beläge zur Jahres-Rechnung pro 1895/1896 (Fach 40, No. 6 )
Supporting documents for the financial statement for 1895/1896
1895-1896
  

Documentation related to expenses, numbered 1 to 129, comprises invoices, receipts, pay orders, and communal decisions. Documentation related to income, numbered 1 to 63, comprises orders to register income, petitions, and communal decisions. The petitions are for reduction in communal tax contribution related to reductions in tax assessment. Includes weekly orders to register income collected for privileges (Ehrenrechte) associated with Torah readings in the synagogue, on specially printed forms (Einnahme-Anweisung über Ehrenrechtsgefälle; income no. 14-52).

 
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28 165 Ausgabe Journal der Synagogen-Gemeinde-Kassse zu Ostrowo, vom 1ten April 1895 bis 31ten Maerz 1896
Expenditures journal of the treasury of the Jewish community of Ostrowo, from the 1st April 1895 to the 31st March 1896
1895-1896
  

Cashbook/journal, with entries made on a printed form spanning facing pages, including a table allowing classification of each entry into a specified budget category. There are running totals on each page, by category and overall. The categories are the same as in the expenditures journal for 1881/1882 (Folder 154). 13 leaves.

 
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28 166 Communal tax payments for years 1896/1897, 1897/1898, and 1898/1899 (fragmentary)
1896-1899
  

Includes the last part of the tax list for 1896/1897, the complete list for 1897/1898 (167 names), and the beginning of the list for 1898/1899. Community members are listed alphabetically, in a table that has columns for payments made at five times during the fiscal year, in July, August, October, January, and March. Only individual payments are recorded, with no totals. A gathering of a notebook, 10 leaves, with no covers, and multiple pages missing at both the front and the back.

 
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28 167 Supporting documents for expenses, for 1896/1897
1896-1897
  

Invoices, receipts, pay orders, and communal decisions. Includes an appeal letter from the Jewish community of Schildberg (Rabbi M. L. Bamberger), concerning the building of a new synagogue (no. 225); and newspaper clippings (attached to invoices) of obituary notices pertaining to Boas Fraenkel, in July 1896 (no. 217), Lazarus Callomon, January 1897 (no. 226), and Simon Spiro, February 1897 (no. 227). The items are numbered, in blue pencil, 3 to 229. Bound, with no covers.

 
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29 168 Ausgabe Beläge pro 1898/99 von No. 1-100
Supporting documents for expenses, for 1898/99, no. 1-100
1898-1899
  

Invoices, receipts, pay orders, and communal decisions. The items are numbered 1 to 100.

 
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29 169 Ausgabe Beläge pro 1898/99 von No. 101-211
Supporting documents for expenses, for 1898/99, no. 101-211
1898-1899
  

Invoices, receipts, pay orders, and communal decisions. The items are numbered 101 to 211.

 
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29 170 Einnahme Beläge pro 1899/1900
Supporting documents for income, for 1899/1900
1899-1900
  

List of back taxes (Resten-Liste bis 1897/1898), orders to register income, and receipts. Includes weekly orders to register income collected for privileges (Ehrenrechte) associated with Torah readings in the synagogue (no. 14-34). Items are numbered 1 to 56, with two unnumbered items at back.

 
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29 171 Supporting documents for expenses, for 1899/1900
1899-1900
  

Invoices, receipts, pay orders, and communal decisions. Includes petitions from G. S. Ledermann (no. 158) and Bertha Sonnenfeld (leaf numbered 163); and two leaves of the newspaper Die jüdische Presse (ed. Hirsch Hildesheimer), December 29, 1899, containing the community's ad for a cantor. The items are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 184. Bound, with gatherings now loose, back cover fragmentary, and no front cover.

 
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29 172 Ausgabe Beläge pro 1900/01
Supporting documents for expenses, for 1900/1901
1900-1901
  

Supporting documents, comprising invoices, receipts, pay orders, and communal decisions. Includes a petition from Leba Steinberg (behind no. 171); an appeal (printed flier) from the Jewish community of Johannisburg, and the association of communities in East Prussia, on behalf of those in need in the city of Kolno following a fire (no. 208); and a letter from Hirsch Hildesheimer, Berlin, May 1900, appealing on behalf of Russian Jews in Bessarabia, who were suffering hunger as a result of crop failures in the region (no. 209). The items are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 228.

 
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30 173 Ausgaben-Beläge pro 1902/03
Supporting documents for expenses, for 1902/1903 (partial)
1902-1903
  

Invoices, receipts, pay orders, and communal decisions. Includes petitions from Moritz Weiss, M. Kurzezunge, Loebel Sternberg (all part of item 167). The items are numbered, in red pencil, 97 to 192. Evidently the second of two volumes for this year.

 
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30 174 Ausgabe Beläge pro 1903/04
Supporting documents for expenses, for 1903/1904 (1 of 2)
1903-1904
  

Invoices, receipts, and pay orders. Includes a dues notification from the Verband der Synagogen-Gemeinden des Regierungs-Bezirks Posen (no. 6). The items are numbered, in red pencil, 1 to 89.

 
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30 175 Ausgabe Beläge pro 1903/1904
Supporting documents for expenses, for 1903/1904 (2 of 2)
1903-1904
  

Invoices, receipts, and pay orders. Includes lists of members receiving charitable aid from the community (no. 134, 135) or from bequests (no. 162-186). The items are numbered, in red pencil, 90 to 186. Occasional use of Hebrew words.

 
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30 176 Ausgabe Beläge pro 1904/1905
Supporting documents for expenses, for 1904/1905 (partial)
1904-1905
  

Invoices, receipts, pay orders, and communal decisions. Includes a petition from Bertha Schramm (between no. 154 and 155). Evidently comprises the second of two booklets (the first was not found in the present collection). Items are numbered 85 to 159.

 
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30 177 Ausgabe Journal pro 1917/18
Expenditures journal for 1917/1918
1917-1919
  

Cashbook/journal, with entries made on a printed form (specific to the community), spanning facing pages, including a table allowing classification of each expense into a specified budget category. There are running totals on each page, by category and overall. The categories are: general administrative costs; salaries; construction and repair; debt repayment; synagogue and religious life (Bynagogen- und Kultus-Bedürfnisse); charitable aid fund (Zum Armenfonds) and miscellaneous charitable expenses (ausserordentliche Unterstützungen); miscellaneous expenses (unvorhergesehene Ausgaben); advances and ongoing expenses (Vorschussweise und durchlaufende Ausgaben); and bequests (Legate). 15 leaves. Order form for matzot provisions, January 1919, laid in.

 
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30 178 Arkhiv fun der Ostrover kehila
Inventory list of Ostrowo Jewish community of Ostrowo records (fragment)
undated
  

Handwritten in a gathering of a lined notebook. Presumed to have been produced in YIVO Vilna, circa 1930s; see the Arrangement note for further details. Entries are numbered 1-4, 98-205. After the title leaf, the leaves are numbered 1-2, 20-33, with leaves numbered 3 to 19 evidently missing, which would have contained inventory entries numbered 5 to 97. In German and Yiddish.

 
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