Guide to the Records of the Briesen Jewish Community Council
1871-1921

RG 15

Processed by Steven M. Lowenstein in the 1970s. Edited by Rivka Schiller in 2006. Additional processing and revision of finding aid by Violet Lutz, 2017.

YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

Center for Jewish History

15 West 16th Street

New York, NY 10011

Phone: (212) 246-6080

Fax: (212) 292-1892

Email: archives@yivo.cjh.org

URL: http://www.yivoinstitute.org

©2018 YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. All rights reserved.
Center for Jewish History, Publisher.
Electronic finding aid was converted to EAD version 2002 by Yakov Sklar in December 2006; the current version was encoded by Violet Lutz in February 2017. Description is in English.

Descriptive Summary

Creator: Briesen Jewish Community Council
Title: Records of the Briesen Jewish Community Council
Dates:1871-1921
Abstract: The collection comprises a portion of the records of the Jewish Community of Briesen, known in German as the Synagogen-Gemeinde zu Briesen, in what today is the Polish town of Wąbrzeźno, located in the Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship. Wąbrzeźno was under Polish rule from the mid 15th century until 1772, when, as a result of the First Partition of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, it was annexed by Prussia, and became part of the province of West Prussia. Following the First World War, the town fell within German territories that were ceded to the Second Polish Republic. The Jewish Community of Briesen was established in the first decades of the 19th century, during the Prussian period. The present records, dated 1871 to 1921, are concentrated in the era of the German Empire; only a handful of items date from the years 1920-1921, when the town was part of Poland. The collection comprises administrative and financial records kept by the Briesen Jewish Community Council, except for one volume of records kept by the Jüdischer Lese-Verein (Jewish Reading Society) of Briesen, in the years 1901 to 1908. Approximately 40% of the collection comprises financial records, 1882-1921, including official budgets and tax lists; and another 20% comprises records related to community employees, especially rabbis and cantors. The remainder of the collection includes correspondence, communal meeting minutes and decisions, circulars announcing meetings, and a variety of administrative records. Included are records pertaining to communal council elections; synagogue seat rentals; burials and the care of graves; the construction and maintenance of the mikveh (ritual bath house); the expansion of the cemetery; synagogue rules and the renovation of the synagogue; charitable activities and cooperation with regional and national Jewish organizations; and the religious school and Jewish elementary school.
Languages: The collection is predominantly in German, with some Hebrew, and very occasional occurrence of Yiddish.
Quantity: 4.6 linear feet (12 boxes, including 10 five-inch manuscript boxes, one half-size box, and one flat box)
Identification: RG 15
Repository: YIVO Institute for Jewish Research
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Historical Note

The town of Wąbrzeźno (German: Briesen), which today is located in the Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship of Poland, is situated among three lakes—Zamkowe (Castle lake), Sicieńskie (Sitno), and Frydek—in the historical region of Chełmno land (Kulmerland), approximately 40 kilometers northeast of Toruń (Thorn), 70 kilometers east of Bydgoszcz (Bromberg), and 120 kilometers south of Gdańsk (Danzig).

In the early Middle Ages, a small fortress and trade center was established there. The place is first documented in 1246, when it was included in a parcel of land that Heinrich von Hohenlohe, Grand Master of the Teutonic Order, assigned to Bishop Heidenreich, the first bishop of Chełmno (Kulm/Culm). In the early 14th century a castle was built there and the settlement obtained town rights. The castle served as a bishop's residence until the 17th century. In 1466, at the conclusion of the Thirteen Years' War between the Teutonic Order and the kingdom of Poland (allied with the Prussian Confederation, composed of towns and nobility of the region), the town became part of the kingdom of Poland. Left in a state of ruin by the war, it did not begin to recover its former significance until 1534, when its town privileges were confirmed and renewed by Bishop Johannes Dantiscus.

During the First Partition of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, in 1772, Wąbrzeźno became part of Prussia, province of West Prussia. With the exception of the period from 1807 to 1815, during the Napoleonic era, when it was incorporated into the Duchy of Warsaw, the town remained Prussian through the end of the First World War. It was known in German as Briesen beginning in 1788. Briesen belonged to the West Prussian county (Landkreis) of Kulm (also spelled Culm), of which the town of Kulm (Chełmno) was the capital, and Thorn (Toruń) the largest city. County Kulm, in turn, was part of the administrative region (Regierungsbezirk) of Marienwerder, with its capital at the town of Marienwerder (Kwidzyn). In 1792 a fire destroyed most of the town, and it was rebuilt. In the early 19th century it remained a small metropolitan center, with its residents earning their living mainly from agriculture and brewing. Briesen experienced development of industry from the mid 19th century on, as it received better roads and a railroad connection. By 1900 it had factories for cement and machinery, as well as modernized breweries and creameries.

In 1887 Briesen became a county seat when the county of Briesen was formed from parts of the counties of Thorn, Culm, Graudenz, and Strasburg. The town and the county of Briesen remained within the administrative region of Marienwerder, in the province of West Prussia.

The Jewish community

According to Alicke, there was already a community of several hundred Jews in Wąbrzeźno (German: Briesen) at the beginning of the 18th century, when it was still part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Heym notes, however, that following the Prussian annexation of the region in 1772, poor Jews below a certain minimum income level were expelled; and official population figures of 1775 show no Jews at all in the town at that time. By 1808 there were 28 Jews in Briesen, and in 1815 there were 11 Jewish families. In 1831, there were 126 Jews in the town, comprising 11% of the total population.

A Jewish cemetery was established by the Briesen community in the early 1820s. During the 1830s a cantor (hazan) taught religion in his home. Through the 1840s religious services were held in a private home. The cornerstone of the synagogue was laid on May 12, 1847, and the building was dedicated in 1850. In 1856 a Jewish elementary school was established. A mikveh, or ritual bath house (Tauchbad, Badehaus) was built in 1882.

Prior to the Prussian constitution of 1848/1850 the great majority of the Jews living in Briesen were not naturalized citizens but, rather, fell into the category of 'tolerated' Jews who lacked full civil rights, and were restricted, for instance, in their freedom of movement and occupation. In 1846 there were 328 Jews in Briesen, of which only 14 held Prussian citizenship.

The size of the Jewish community increased steadily in the mid 19th century, reaching 465 in 1861 and 540 in 1871 (14.7% and 14.9%, respectively, of the total population).

The community's first set of bylaws (Gemeindestatut) was dated July 17, 1857. The Briesen community encompassed some 76 smaller localities in the surrounding region. There were two other independent Jewish communities in the vicinity: Gollub (Golub) and Schönsee (Kowalewo Pomorskie).

During the 19th century most Jews of Briesen worked in trade and crafts. In 1861 the heads of households included 26 merchants, one doctor, one clerk, 23 craftsmen, two innkeepers, nine traders, eight peddlers, five widows, and eight laborers.

In the late 19th century the Jews of Briesen were well integrated in the civic life of the town; in 1885, seven of the 18 city council members were Jews.

The community peaked in size around 1885, when it numbered 589 members, comprising 12.7% of the total population.

As in West Prussia generally, the Jewish population declined steadily around the turn of the 20th century, mainly due to members moving away to larger German cities, or emigrating. The number of Jews in Briesen was 459 in 1895, and 293 in 1910, making up 8.7% and 3.6%, respectively, of the total population.

In 1905 the synagogue was renovated and redesigned under the direction of architect (master bricklayer) Franz Manna.

Interwar period and Holocaust

Following the First World War, under the terms of the Treaty of Versailles, which took effect in January 1920, most of West Prussia, including Briesen, became part of the Second Polish Republic. The town became known again by its Polish name, Wąbrzeźno. Many Jews, as well as non-Jewish Germans, migrated at that time to areas that were remaining part of Germany. The last rabbi to serve the community, Rabbi Siegbert Neufeld, left the town in 1920. There were 92 Jews in the town in 1921, and 26 in 1925, making up 1.3% and 0.3%, respectively, of the total population.

In the interwar period the firm Polski Przemysl Gumowy (Polish Rubber Industry), PPG, which was headed by the Jewish entrepreneur Solomon Halperin, of Baranowichy (Baranowicze), established a branch factory for rubber-making in the town.

From the late 1920s to the 1930s the Jewish community grew again to as many as 100. In 1932 the Jewish community of Wąbrzeźno was combined with that of nearby Golub.

During the Nazi occupation, which began in September 1939, the town was located in Reichsgau Danzig-West Prussia, Marienwerder county. The Jewish residents were placed in a transition camp set up in the PPG factory in October to December 1939. At that point, like other Jews of Western Poland, they were expelled from the area and driven toward Warsaw, into the district of occupied Poland known as the General Gouvernement. The Central Database of Shoa Victims' Names maintained by Yad Vashem contains data on at least 30 Jews who last resided in Wąbrzeźno, and also some who lived in Golub (the community with which Wąbrzeźno merged), prior to the Second World War, as well as a great many more who were born in Briesen (Wąbrzeźno) but had subsequently moved to Berlin or other German cities, from where they were deported during the Nazi period.

Rabbis and secular leaders of the community

Following are rabbis who served in Briesen, with their approximate years of service:

Israel Goldschmidt, 1878-1880[?]
Leopold Treitel, 1881-1884
Simon Eppenstein, July 1889–November 1911
Rubin Halpersohn, April 1912–March 1914
Siegbert Neufeld, 1915-1920

The Jewish community council consisted of a body of representatives, known collectively as the representatives' assembly (Repräsentanten-Versammlung), who were elected by all the voting members of the community; the representatives in turn elected an executive body (Vorstand), typically consisting of three members. Following, with very approximate years of service (gleaned, as best as possible, from the files in the present collection), are community members who served as chair (Vorsitzende) or co-chair of the community executive, from the late 19th century through the First World War:

Albert Cohn, 1880-1882
Leopold A. Littmann, 1882-1888
Herrmann Wessolowski, 1889-1891
Julius Löwenberg, 1893-1894
Max Bauer, 1894-1897
Simon Ascher, 1895-1907
Sally Bernstein, 1898-1902
Julius Callmann, 1898-1919
David Pollitzer, 1904-1910
Louis Lewin, 1907-1910, 1913-1919

and those who served as chair of the representatives' assembly:

Max Meyer, 1871-1873, 1886-1887, 1892-1893
L. Hochstein, 1873-1883
Moritz Lewin, 1884-1886
Sally Moses, circa 1888, 1899
Simon Ascher, 1888-1891, 1893-1895
Jacob Meyer, 1896-1897
Max Michalowitz, 1901-1902, 1907-1908, 1912-1914
Gustav Goetz, circa 1906

Postscript

No Jewish community was ever re-established in Wąbrzeźno in the postwar period. The Jewish cemetery in Wąbrzeźno, the entrance to which was once located on Maciej Rataj Street, was destroyed in 1939 during the Nazi occupation, and no trace of it remains on the site. As late as the 1950s remnants of Jewish gravestones that had been used for various purposes, were found in the area. In fact, in 2016, a town resident reported that some 150 fragments of gravestones from the Jewish cemetery had been used as paving stones in the yard of the property owned by his family since shortly after the war; he contacted the Virtual Shtetl, of the POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews, Warsaw, which notified the Rabbinical Commission for Jewish Cemeteries in Poland, and the From the Depths Foundation, regarding the removal and further care of the stones.

References

Alicke, Klaus-Dieter (2008). Lexikon der jüdischen Gemeinden im deutschen Sprachraum. 3 vols. Güterloh: Güterloher Verlagshaus. Vol. 1. "Briesen (Westpreussen)." Available online at: www.jüdische-gemeinden.de

Aschkewitz, Max (1967). Zur Geschichte der Juden in Westpreussen. Marburg/Lahn: 1967. Available online in the Virtuelle Fachbibliothek Osteuropa, at www.vifaost.de.

Heym, Benno. Geschichte des Kreises Briesen und seiner Ortschaften. Briesen: Verlag von Otto Weiser, 1902. "Jüdische Gemeinden," p. 125-128. Available online in the Kujawasko-Pomorska Digital Library, at kpbc.umk.pl .

International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS). "Wabrezezno: Kujawsko-Pomorskie." International Jewish Cemetery Project.

Virtual Shtetl. "Wąbrzeźno." Originally a project of the Association of the Jewish Historical Institute of Poland, since 2012 the Virtual Shtetl website, www.sztetl.org.pl, is sponsored by the POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews.

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Scope and Content Note

The collection comprises a portion of the records of the Jewish Community of Briesen, known in German as the Synagogen-Gemeinde zu Briesen, in what today is the Polish town of Wąbrzeźno, located in the Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship. Wąbrzeźno was under Polish rule from the mid 15th century until 1772, when, as a result of the First Partition of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, it was annexed by Prussia, and became part of the province of West Prussia. Following the First World War, the town fell within German territories that were ceded to the Second Polish Republic, in January 1920, under the terms of the Treaty of Versailles. The Jewish Community of Briesen was established in the first decades of the 19th century, during the Prussian period. The present records, dated 1871 to 1921, are concentrated in the era when Prussia was part of the German Empire, after German unification in 1871; only a handful of items date from the years 1920-1921, when the town was located in Poland. The collection comprises administrative and financial records kept by the Briesen Jewish Community Council, except for one volume of records kept by the Jüdischer Lese-Verein (Jewish Reading Society) of Briesen, in the years 1901 to 1908 (Folder 103).

Approximately 40% of the collection by extent comprises financial records (Series II), 1882-1921, including official budgets and tax lists; tax collection ledgers; audit reports and account books; supporting documents for financial statements; and invoices and receipts.

Another 20% of the collection concerns the community's religious institutions, Series IV, with the following subseries: IV.1. Synagogue includes material related to the community's synagogue rules, and synagogue seat rentals, as well as the renovation of the synagogue, in 1905, and the construction of an emergency staircase in 1910. IV.2. Cemetery includes records of burials, and the ownership and care of graves, as well as materials concerning the property, especially the expansion of the cemetery in 1900. IV.3. Mikveh documents the construction of the mikveh, or ritual bath house, in 1882-1883, and the subsequent upkeep, renovation, and administration of the facilities, through 1911 (including architectural plans and technical drawings). Finally, Subseries IV.4 contains a few files concerning kosher meat tax (krupka) administration, in 1880 to 1891; the slaughterhouse facilities, in 1885; and the hiring of a Jewish butcher, in 1905.

Nearly 20% of the collection comprises records related to community employees (Series V), especially rabbis and cantors (with assistant cantors also serving as shochets, or ritual slaughterers), including contracts and correspondence, as well as application letters and supporting documents, such as recommendation letters, related to many candidates who applied to the community as rabbis or cantors but were not hired. The fullest documentation in this series pertains to Rabbi Simon Eppenstein, over the course of his long tenure with the community, from 1889 to 1911. Among the other religious personnel represented are Rabbi Rubin Halpersohn, and cantors Salomon Blaustein, Markus May, and Georg Jospe.

The remainder of the collection includes correspondence, communal meeting minutes and decisions, circulars announcing meetings, and a variety of other administrative records. Series I. General administrative records of the Jewish Community of Briesen contains documentation of communal elections and general files of communal council minutes and decisions, along with related correspondence, and other general and miscellaneous materials. The records in Series III mainly encompass charitable activities, especially relief for Jewish migrant poor and contributions to various charitable Jewish causes outside the community. Some of the materials in this series reflect the community's cooperation with Jewish organizations on a regional and national level, pertaining to general issues as well as charitable matters. Included are files of correspondence with the Deutsch-Israelitischer Gemeindebund (German-Jewish Community Alliance; Folder 92), the Verband der deutschen Juden (Union of German Jews; Folder 94), and, following the First World War, the Zentralwohlfahrtsstelle der deutschen Juden (Central welfare board of German Jews; Folder 98). In addition, Series III includes a small amount of material pertaining to education (Folders 99-103), including the community's Hebrew religious school, in 1897, and Jewish elementary school, mainly in 1906-1907, as well as the records of the local Jewish Reading Society (mentioned above), which was chaired by the community rabbi, Rabbi Simon Eppenstein (Folder 103).

Over 90% of the collection by extent is comprised of files that were organized in the community, either as bound volumes, or as sets of documents secured in file covers using file fasteners. The majority of these original volumes have a title inscribed on the front cover. Brief titles are also found on flaps of paper, or flags, that are typically affixed to the bottom edge of the inside front or back cover of the bound volume, evidently designed to hang outside of the volume, so that one could easily identify the volume before removing it from the shelf or compartment where it was stored. Some of the volumes bear on the front the printed heading: "Acta der Synagogen-Gemeinde zu Briesen W.-Pr., betreffend" (Records of the Jewish Community of Briesen, West Prussia, concerning), with the subject, or file title proper, following, filled in by hand.

In the current container list, the original German-language titles of the volumes, if they have survived, have been preserved, with an English-language title following on the next line; when no original title is present, a title is supplied in English. In some instances, files that were organized in the community are labeled on the front cover with a number (e.g. "No. 131") that perhaps indicates something about how the files were sequenced and grouped (the numbers sometimes repeat); when present, that number has been included in the present container list, in parentheses following the folder title.

Bound volumes or other files assembled in the community are generally of a substantial size; a leaf count is provided only for smaller files, of under 50 leaves.

Less than 10% of the collection by extent arrived as loose documents, with no original folders; those items have been grouped in folders and integrated with records relating to similar categories. Such folders have a supplied English title and are described as "loose documents" in the folder description.

A note concerning the filing practice of the community: Documents in bound volumes are most often arranged in a roughly chronological order; however, the more modern files, dating from after 1900, which are typically contained in commercial file covers, and were secured using file fasteners, are almost always filed in reverse chronological order (or, in the case of numbered financial documents, reverse sequential order), i.e. the oldest items are found at the back of the folder, and the items of the latest dates are at the front. To the extent that chronology is relevant, folder descriptions, for the sake of coherence, generally proceed chronologically, regardless of whether the documents are filed in forward or reverse order.

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Arrangement

The great majority of the collection consists of files that were organized in the community, while it still existed, many of them with original German-language titles. During an earlier processing at the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research in New York in the 1970s, Dr. Steven M. Lowenstein produced a finding aid, including an inventory list, without specifying any arrangement. During the present processing, the materials have been newly arranged, and grouped into series representing broad categories of types of records, in order to facilitate an overview.

The collection is arranged in the following series:

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Access and Use

Access Restrictions

Collection closed for digitization under the Edward Blank Vilna Collections Project.

Permission to use the collection must be obtained from the YIVO Archives by writing in advance to the Director of the Archives and Library at archives@yivo.cjh.org.

Use Restrictions

Permission to publish part or parts of the collection must be obtained from the Director of the Archives and Library by writing to archives@yivo.cjh.org or by writing to Director of YIVO Archives and Library, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY 10011.

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Related Material

A copy of the bylaws of the community dated 1883 are held in the archives of the Centrum Judaicum foundation, located at the Neue Synagoge (New Synagogue), on Oranienburger Strasse, in Berlin, according to the following published catalog: Quellen zur Geschichte der Juden in den Archiven der neuen Bundesländer, Volume 6, Parts 1 and 2, edited by Stefi Jersch-Wenzel und Reinhard Rürup (Munich: Saur, 2001). Several items related to the community dating from the late 19th century are listed in the following publication as held in Polish archives in Marienburg and Toruń: Quellen zur Geschichte der Juden in polnischen Archiven, edited by Stefi Jersch-Wenzel (München: Saur, 2003); see place index (Ortsregister).

In 1965 Rabbi Siegbert Neufeld, then living in Ramat-Chen, Israel, donated to what was then called the Jewish Historical General Archives—today, the Central Archives for the History of the Jewish People, Jerusalem—a transcription of an 1827 memorial book from Briesen; the donation is reported in Zion (journal of the Historical Society of Israel), vol. 30, no. 3/4, 1965, p. viii; available via JSTOR: www.jstor.org/stable/23552017.

The YIVO Institute for Jewish Research holds other records of Jewish communities in Germany, including: RG 13 Ostrowo (Ostrów Wielkopolski) Jewish Community Council; RG 14 Krotoszyn Jewish Community Council; RG 244 Adelebsen Jewish Community; and RG 31 Germany (Vilna Archives) Collection, Series IV, containing smaller groupings of records of the Filehne (Wieleń), Raschkow (Raszków), and Rybnik communities.

Finally, the archives of the Leo Baeck Institute, New York, also at the Center for Jewish History, focuses on materials pertaining to the history and culture of German-speaking Jewry; in particular, the West European Collection (AR 4099) may contain a small amount of material related to the Briesen community.

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Other Finding Aid

The earlier finding aid, produced by Dr. Steven M. Lowenstein at YIVO in New York in the 1970s, is on file. The YIVO Archives also has on file a document which is a concordance connecting the new current folder numbers and the old folder numbers assigned by Dr. Lowenstein.

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Custodial History

The collection was received by the YIVO Institute in Vilna in the prewar period. During the German occupation of Vilna in 1942, these records were among the materials looted by the Einsatzstab Reichsleiter Rosenberg (a special task force of the National Socialist regime devoted to the plunder of art and cultural artifacts) and sent to the Institut zur Erforschung der Judenfrage (Institute for Study of the Jewish Question), an institution of the National Socialist Party (NSDAP), in Frankfurt am Main. In 1945 these records were among materials recovered by the U.S. Army and returned to the YIVO Institute in New York, via the U.S. Army archival depot in Offenbach. The records arrived at YIVO in New York in 1947.

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Preferred Citation

Published citations should take the following form:

Identification of item, date (if known); Records of the Briesen Jewish Community Council; RG 15; box number; folder number; YIVO Institute for Jewish Research.

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Processing information

During the current processing the materials were transferred into new acid-free archival folders, and the folders were newly arranged and numbered sequentially (see the Arrangement note). The materials also underwent conservation treatment.

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Access Points

Click on a subject to search that term in the Center's catalog. Return to the Top of Page

Container List

 

Series I: General administrative records of the Jewish Community of Briesen, 1871-1920

In German, with occasional occurrence of Hebrew.
20 folders
Arrangement:

Files pertaining to elections and governance are followed by documentation of community council meetings, then general and miscellaneous materials. Within any given grouping, files are arranged roughly chronologically.

Scope and Content:

This series of general administrative records encompasses records of community council elections in the period 1882 to 1913 (Folders 1-3), as well as some general governance matters in the 1880s to 1890s (Folders 4-6); meeting notices, minutes, and related correspondence and other documents, pertaining to community council (representatives' assembly or executive) meetings, 1871-1913 (Folders 7-15); a log of outgoing correspondence covering the period 1898 to 1919 (Folder 16); and general correspondence and miscellaneous materials, 1891-1920 (Folder 17-20).

The files related to community council meetings provide a comprehensive record of communal decisions over extended periods, including a minutes book of the representatives dating from mid 1871 to mid 1894 (Folder 7); and chronologically-ordered files of communal meeting minutes, together with supporting materials, covering 1901 to 1902, and 1907 to 1913 (Folders 12-15). Since these files relate to all aspects of communal life, they sometimes overlap with, or complement materials found in the other series of the collection.

Of the general and miscellaneous materials, two files, 1905-1910, concern matters related to a bequest from community member Clara Joachimsthal, and the community's role as executor of that estate (Folders 17-18); and a small file of materials related to purchases in 1919 (Folder 19) includes sketches and a cost estimate from a local craftsman for a memorial dedicated to community members who died in the First Word War (without information about a final decision or verification of purchase).

BoxFolderTitleDate
1 1 Elections of Jewish Community Council Chairs 1882-1888
  

Concerns election of chair/vice chair of both the representatives' assembly and the executive body, in meetings of those respective bodies (not entire community). Communal minutes; meeting notices (circulars) with agendas, 1887-1888; and resignation letter from representative Max Meyer, March 1888. Bound volume. 18 leaves.

 
1 2 Wahlsachen
Election matters
1891, 1894-1897
  

Concerns elections of representatives by the entire Jewish community. Correspondence with the government, including copies of announcements and election meeting minutes by the mayor (Bürgermeister/Regierungs-Commissar), and approval of election results by Marienwerder office; copy of communal announcement by the community executive, July 1894; letters to communal leaders from individual members; list of eligible voters, September 1897; and newspaper issue (Briesener Kreisblatt, August 25, 1897) containing announcement of election meeting by Briesen mayor Gostomski (p. 4). Letters from individuals concern declining office (Max Michalowitz, 1894), resigning (S. Moses, 1895), or notifying of absence from coming meeting (Herrmann Wessolowski, 1895). Bound volume. 30 leaves.

 
1 3 Neuwahlen des Vorstandes u. Repräsentanten (No. 131)
Elections of the Jewish Community Executive and Representatives
1895-1913
  

Correspondence with the government, 1900-1912, including government directives, 1901, about submitting lists of elected officers, copies of announcements and election meeting minutes by the mayor, and approval of election results by Marienwerder office; list of eligible voters, with tax contributions, 1912 (heading: Repräsentanten-Wahlen 1912), and several other undated lists; circulars about meetings or election results, from community executive; list of representatives to receive invitations for election of the community executive ("Verzeichnis über die Aushändigung von Einladungen betr. Neuwahl"), August 1912; correspondence with members in Lissewo and Dombrowken, September 1912; note listing dates of inaugurations of newly elected officers in 1913; and inclusive list of communal officers, with terms, giving those elected from 1895 to 1913 (bound booklet, "Verzeichniss der Mitglieder des Vorstandes und der Repräsentanten-Versammlung"). All the documents are dated 1900 to 1913, except the latter list of officers, which possibly dates back to 1895. In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner."

 
1 4 Fining of community representatives for unexcused absences from meetings 1883-1885, 1889
  

Minutes/decisions and internal correspondence of the Briesen Jewish Community Council; correspondence with the government; petitions; and one receipt. Includes petitions from representatives Theodor Tobias, Meyer Moses, and Max Meyer. Bound volume. 13 leaves.

 
1 5 Procedural complaint by community executive member Simon Ascher 1896
  

Correspondence with the government, including the complaint submitted by Ascher to the government official (Regierungspräsident) in Marienwerder, against community executive Max Bauer; Bauer's response to the complaint; and a letter from the official conveying his judgment on the matter. The complaint concerned Bauer's having asked a deputy member to attend an executive meeting in Ascher's place in a particular instance, although the community statutes allowed a deputy to take the place of a member only in the event of a more extended absence. Loose documents (4 items).

 
1 6 Treasurer's post 1886-1887
  

Correspondence, communal minutes, and meeting notices (circulars). Includes letter from Julius Callmann, May 1886, resigning the treasurer's position after more than three years in office; Max Meyer, Julius Loewenberg, and Abraham Meyer, declining the position when they are offered it; and treasurer Kannowski, concerning a raise in salary, in 1887. The treasurer's post was made a salaried position after a community member could not be found to fill it; the hiring of Kannowski is recorded in the minutes of July 1886. Bound volume. 19 leaves.

 
1 7 Minutes of the Jewish Community Representatives 1871-1894
  

The meetings are led by the representatives' chair; in some instances the chair and/or other member(s) of the community executive (Vorstand) are also present. In the first part of the volume, communal decisions are individually numbered 44 to 156; thereafter the pages (not the decisions) are numbered 157 to approximately 295 (toward the back the page numbers are written only every few pages). The extant minutes begin in the middle of the decisions of a meeting in mid 1871 (date not given); the last meeting covered is in June 1894. Bound volume lacking covers or a title page, with some leaves loose. Incomplete.

 
1 8 Jewish Community Council Meetings – Auction of community contracts 1883-1893
  

Pertains to delivery of oil and petroleum for the synagogue, and distribution of matzot to the poor. Jewish community announcements of auctions; communal minutes/decisions, including auction meetings, and lists of poor to receive matzot; invoice/receipt, 1883, from L. Silberberg; bids, 1888; and petition, 1889. Bound volume. 44 leaves.

 
1 9 Community representatives' meetings lacking a quorum undated, 1883, 1885
  

Two sets of minutes and one meeting notice pertaining to two representatives' meetings, April 1883 and June 1885, that lacked sufficient attendance to proceed. Bound volume. 3 leaves.

 
1 10 Jewish Community Council Meetings 1889-1890, 1894, 1896-1898
  

Meeting notices (circulars) of the representatives' assembly or the community executive, some with agendas; related correspondence and invoices; and one set of communal minutes/decisions. One item is a circular concerning approval of payment of travel expenses to a family moving to Berlin, 1889. A meeting notice in 1890 is accompanied by four documents considered at the meeting, with decision noted, including a reimbursement request and two invoices approved for payment, and one petition for aid that was denied; one of the invoices is from Herrmann Wessolowski, for delivery of oil and petroleum in fiscal year 1889/1890, and the other is from C. Pfennig, for repairs in the mikveh. Two meeting notices in March 1894 contain references to Cantor Blaustein; one notice in that month is accompanied by a letter from the Briesen municipal government proposing that the two Jewish classes be combined with the Christian school; and one notice of February 1897 has an agenda item pertaining to the religious school. The minutes, July 1896, contain references to the budget plan for 1896/1897 and the salary of the first cantor. Loose documents (22 items).

 
1 11 Miscellaneous internal correspondence of the Jewish Community Council 1889, 1894, 1896-1897
  

Miscellaneous correspondence between the community executive and the representatives' assembly. Includes the following: In 1889, a letter from community executive chair Wessolowski addressed to the representatives' assembly (listing agenda items), a letter from representative Kiewe to Wessolowski, and a resignation letter from representative Theodor Tobias; in 1894, a letter from Simon Ascher, chair of the representatives' assembly, to the community executive; in 1896, two letters from community executive chair Bauer, addressed to Jacob Meyer, chair of the representatives' assembly, and one letter from Simon Ascher to Bauer, about retrieving files; and in 1897, an exchange of notes between Meyer and Ascher. The 1889 item from Kiewe concerns certain decisions made at a representatives' meeting that lacked a quorum, with response from Wessolowski. Ascher's letter concerns access to a copy of the community bylaws (Gemeindestatut). One of the 1896 items concerns action needed on the conveyance of a certain parcel of land; the other concerns a proposed supplementary payment to Cantor Holz, related to his rental of an apartment. The note from Meyer in 1897 is of a procedural nature, with Ascher referring Meyer to the acting/vice chair as the person to receive the decisions of the representatives' meeting (no details about the content of the decisions are given). Loose documents (8 items).

 
1 12 Skripturen 1901
Proceedings of Jewish Community Council Meetings 1901
1901-1902
  

Meeting notices (circulars), with agendas; correspondence from the community executive to the representatives' assembly regarding matters to be addressed; and correspondence, including petitions/complaints, as well as invoices, cost estimates, and receipts. Included are two letters from Rabbi Eppenstein, one supporting a petition for aid from cantor and religion teacher Aronsohn, and another concerning the need to address the problem of low attendance at synagogue morning services, sometimes too few for a minyen; a request from the Jüdischer Lese-Verein zu Briesen (headed by Rabbi Eppenstein); and invoices related to the burials of widow Pauline Götz and Mr. Wessolowski. Among correspondence from outside the community are appeals for aid from the Jewish communities in Athens, Greece (A. Constantinis), Löwen in Schlesien (Dr. Gross), and Fürstenwalde/Spree (Julius Meseritzer); and an appeal for subscriptions from Carl Schulz, of Conitz, founder/publisher of the newspaper Ostdeutsche Tageszeitung, which aimed to fight anti-Semitism. An issue (2 leaves) of the latter newspaper (March 31, 1901) is included. Among other correspondents are the following organizations: Ferien-Kolonien für Jüdische Kinder, Berlin; Nahrungsmittel-Industrie-Berufsgenossenschaft; Jüdisches Krankenhaus zu Memel; the Verband der westpreussischen Synagogen-Gemeinden; and Verein der jüdischen Lehrer der Ostprovinzen, Lissa (Albert Herbst, appealing for support for the family of deceased teacher Isidor Tint, Czempin). In the original commercial file cover "Stolzenberger Schnell-Hefter."

 
1 13 Skripturen 1907/08 (No. 103)
Proceedings of Jewish Community Council Meetings 1907/08
1907-1908
  

Meeting notices (circulars), with agendas; correspondence from the community executive to the representatives' assembly regarding matters to be addressed; correspondence with organizations, individuals, and the government; petitions; minutes of the burial society; and communal circular. The latter, dated June 1907, lists 57 members, who are asked to note their opinion concerning a proposal to reestablish a fund to aid the poor ("Armen-Kasse"), with the understanding that community members as individuals would then refrain from giving money to migrant poor ("durchziehende Arme"). Correspondence includes a thank-you letter from community executive member Julius Callmann and his wife for well wishes on their 25th wedding anniversary (December 1907), addressed to Max Michalowitz, representatives' assembly chair; and items from the following Jewish communities: Schönlanke (F. Joseph), asking advice about the building of a mikveh, and the Chevra Kadisha in Bischofswerder (M. Danziger), asking for aid to build a mikveh (both in 1908). One item conveys a decision of the burial society (1908), concerning the burial of Mrs. Baumann. Organizations represented include: Verein Lehrlingsheim, Pankow, Berlin; Schutz-Komitee für durchreisende russische Juden in Königsberg (Committee for the Protection of Migrant Russian Jews in Königsberg), a committee of the Hilfsverein der Deutschen Juden (Aid Society of the German Jews), sub-committee for Soldau and Illowo. In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner."

 
1 14 Scripturen 1910/11
Proceedings of Jewish Community Council Meetings 1910/11
1909-1911
  

Meeting notices (circulars), with agendas; list of regular payments to be made by the treasurer without individual pay orders, as directed by the community executive, under the 1910/1911 budget; correspondence from the community executive to the representatives' assembly, regarding matters to be addressed; correspondence with current or former members, government offices, and others; receipts, including for charitable donations; audit committee report for 1909/1910; and cost estimates. Only one item is dated in 1909. Correspondents include the journal Israelitisches Familienblatt; the Verein selbständiger handwerker jüdischen Glaubens, Berlin; the Jewish community of Berlin; and Rabbi Sonnabend, of Dobrzyń near Gollub. Several items concern tax contributions due to the community from a few families in Lissewo and one in Dombrowken. Two bilingual printed receipts for donations, in Hebrew and German. In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner," custom printed for the records of the Jewish Community of Briesen.

 
BoxFolderTitleDate
2 15 Scripturen 1912/13 (No. 103)
Proceedings of Jewish Community Council Meetings 1912/13
1911-1913
  

Meeting notices (circulars), with agendas; correspondence from the community executive to the representatives' assembly, regarding matters to be addressed; correspondence with community members, the government, and others; petitions; communal minutes/decisions related to petitions; receipts/acknowledgments for charitable donations; and cost estimate. Only one item is dated in 1911. Correspondence includes a thank-you note from J. Alexander for well wishes on his 70th birthday; an attestation for Carl Müller, Berlin, concerning glass painting ("Glasmalerei") that he executed in the synagogue in 1905; an inquiry from the Schloppe Jewish community, concerning details about obtaining government permission to employ a non-German in the congregation, with response concerning Cantor May, an Austrian; a recommendation letter for Cantor Albert Falkenstein, responding to an inquiry from the Jewish community in Brandenburg; exchange with government assessor concerning tax assessments of members in Lissewo and Dombrowken. Cost estimate is for two synagogue seats. In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner," custom printed for the records of the Jewish Community of Briesen.

 
2 16 Log of outgoing correspondence 1898-1919
  

Entries dated October 1898 to February 1919, in a pre-printed book, with columns for date, recipient (name and town/city), description of content, postage paid, and remarks. Periodic summation of postage noted. Occasional loose items or items affixed to the pages, including receipts for telephone conversations (from 1910 on). Bound volume. 37 leaves.

 
2 17 Clara Joachimsthal'sche Nachlass-Sache (No. 119)
Estate of Clara Joachimsthal
1905, 1907-1910
  

Concerns the Jewish community's responsibility as executor of the estate of Miss (Fräulein) Joachimsthal, who died in Briesen, August 18, 1908. Includes: fire insurance policy, 1907, in Joachimsthal's name, with household inventory; correspondence of the Jewish community executive with the local court, the inheritance tax office, Danzig, and others; internal correspondence of the Jewish Community of Briesen, including acknowledgments from the community treasurer of interest income received and taxes paid; inventory of the estate ("Verzeichnis über den Nachlass"), August 31, 1908; undated handwritten text of a eulogy (for a deceased male who left behind a widow); newspaper issue of the Briesener Zeitung, September 5, 1908, containing the community's announcement of its role as executor (p. 4); communal minutes/decisions; invoices and receipts, including doctor's prescriptions in Joachimsthal's name, from shortly before her death, two receipts signed by her, 1907-1908, and 15 items (numbered in red pencil 21 to 35), 1908, documenting expenses for the estate; mortgage deed (Hypothekenbrief), Briesen, 1907, concerning a property of Johann Gaszynski; entry from the land registry of Briesen, 1905, related to a property of Franz Saft and a loan to Joachimsthal; court decision, Briesen, 1909, related to auction of property of Robert Radinz; checking account booklet for account in the name of the Clara Joachimsthal estate, at the Vorschuss-Verein zu Briesen (Credit association of Briesen); and financial report on the estate, 1910, with undated list of payments related to medical expenses, funeral and burial. Correspondents include family members I. Joachimsthal, Detroit, Michigan (Detroit Millinery Co.), and Henriette Joachimsthal, Briesen; the Casper Lachmann’sches Waisenhaus, a Jewish orphanage in Graudenz; the Johanniter hospital, Briesen; and S. Meyer, sculptor in Thorn, concerning a grave memorial (Denkmal). In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner."

 
2 18 Gaszynski’sches Grundstück (No. 120)
Gaszynski property
1909-1910
  

Documents related to auction of the property owned by Johann Gaszynski, February 1909, with note of purchase by the Jewish Community of Briesen; correspondence with the municipal court, government offices, and others; Jewish communal minutes/decisions, 1909-1910, as well as meeting notice (circular), 1909; copy, 1909, of entry for the property in the land registry of Briesen, 1907, pertaining to loan of Clara Joachimsthal; court documents in law suit against Gaszynski, as tenant; registration of lease ("Pacht- und Mietverzeichnis"), 1909; Jewish community treasurer's acknowledgment of refund of interest income received, 1910; and community executive's order to register income from re-sale of the property, 1910. Correspondence includes exchanges wtih Gaszynski, as tenant; copy of letter to government tax inspector (Zollinspektor) Wohlfeil, Strasburg; and exchanges with attorney Ruhnau, Briesen (with copies of his correspondence representing the community). With the purchase, the Jewish community had aimed to mitigate debt from the Joachimsthal estate; in September 1910 the community sold the property to Matthias Topczynski. The property was located on Klein Walliczer Weg. In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner."

 
2 19 Materialien (No. 217)
Correspondence and supporting materials regarding various purchases
1919
  

Correspondence, cost estimates, and sketches. Topics include office supplies, a cabinet for the storage of records (technical drawing included), and a war memorial/plaque. Sketches by Briesen craftsmen: Johann Kaminski, for a memorial plaque, and carpenters Zander and Ahrend, for a cabinet. German title taken from flag affixed to inside back cover. In the original commercial file cover "Schnellhefter Helios." 25 leaves.

 
2 20 Miscellaneous undated, 1891, 1894-1912, 1920
  

Correspondence, notes, invoice/receipt, list of fees, and a piece of blank letterhead (printed for the 1900s). Includes: Cover letter from attorney Stein in matter of Günther, 1891. Fragment of an invoice from a locksmith, 1893. Postcard, 1894, from F. Wolff, Rehden, to J. Alexander, concerning slaughter fees. Telegram from Kulikow[?] of Thorn, about arrival in Briesen, 1894[?]. Request for reimbursement from Pauline Hirsch, addressed to the Jewish community executive via Rabbi Eppenstein, 1897. Two slips of paper with notes, likely in the hand of Rabbi Eppenstein, with some Hebrew (in one instance, possibly notes for a sermon). Postcard from K. Sonnabend, Gollub, 1912, making reference to an honorarium and to his father, the rabbi. Reimbursement request/receipt from Moritz Neumann, 1920. List of fees for the saying of the El Male Rachamim (meaning "G-d full of compassion"), a memorial prayer for the deceased, undated. Fragment of a typed letter signed by S. Bernstein. Loose documents (9 items).

 
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Series II: Financial records, 1882-1921

In German.
64 folders
Arrangement:

Arranged in the following subseries:

Scope and Content:

This series contains records related to the community's budget and financial accounts, including tax lists, audit records, account books, supporting documents for financial statements, and invoices and receipts. Further details are conveyed in the scope notes for each subseries.

Subseries 1: Budget plans, 1882-1918

21 folders
Arrangement:

Arranged chronologically, with two folders of miscellaneous materials at the end.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains records related to the community's annual budget plans in the period 1882 to 1918, with gaps. The budget plan (Haushaltplan; Haushaltungsplan) pertained to the fiscal year, from April 1 to March 31 of the following year. It had two main parts: the budget proper (Haushalt; Etat) and the approved communal tax list, or tax roll (Heberolle). The tax list includes the names of individual community members (heads of households), their profession, their annual general tax contribution, their contribution due to the Jewish community, and remarks (e.g. a reduction of a certain amount, or a note that the person has emigrated).

After being prepared and approved by the Jewish community council, the budget plan was then submitted to the local municipal government in Briesen, which then forwarded it to the provincial regional government office in Marienwerder, for final approval. The Jewish community council approval of the budget is typically signified by signatures of members of the Jewish community representatives' assembly, followed by the signatures of the community executive (a three-person body) and the executive's stamp reading "Vorstand der Synagogen-Gemeinde Briesen Wpr." (Community executive of the Jewish Community of Briesen, West Prussia), usually on the last page of the budget portion of the plan. The acknowledgments of the municipal and provincial regional government offices, with signatures and stamps of the respective offices (sometimes the stamp of the Marienwerder office is on a small paper seal rather than directly on the document), typically appear on the last page of the tax list, and serve to certify that the tax list submitted is valid. The municipal office specifically certifies that the figures used for the general government tax assessment for the individuals listed are accurate (those figures provided the basis on which the Jewish community tax was then assessed). The stamp of the Briesen office reads: "Der Magistrat zu Briesen Wpr." (The magistrate of Briesen, West Prussia); the stamp of the Marienwerder office reads "Königliche Preussische Regierung, Marienwerder" (Royal Prussian Government, Marienwerder). Along with the approved budget plan, certain documents that the Jewish community had been required to submit would also be returned by the Marienwerder office (typically, community council meeting notices and minutes documenting the community's approval of the budget, and the community's letter to the county-level government income tax assessment commission, seeking tax information on the Jewish community members residing in localities outside of Briesen). The process of preparing the budget plan for the upcoming fiscal year began around March, and the community typically received the approved budget plan from the Marienwerder provincial regional office in May or June.

The records mainly comprise official copies of the budget plan (typically a bound booklet), often accompanied by the cover letter from the Marienwerder provincial regional office, upon return of the approved plan, with enclosure of the various accompanying documents that the community had submitted; in two instances, only a preliminary version of the budget plan was found (for 1903/1904, Folder 31, and 1912/1913, Folder 34). Two folders (27, 30) contain drafts and other materials related to the official budget plans in the respective preceding folders, and two folders at the end of the subseries (Folders 40-41) contain miscellaneous materials related to the preparation of budget plans in instances in which no complete version of the budget plan was found.

BoxFolderTitleDate
2 21 Budget and tax list for 1882/83 1882
  

Approved by the Jewish community council, with government acknowledgment from the provincial regional office in Marienwerder. The budget portion is fragmentary, with title page and beginning of the income section missing. The tax list (Heberolle) has 111 names. 6 leaves.

 
2 22 Budgets and tax lists for 1883/84 and 1884/85 1882-1885
  

Correspondence with the provincial regional government office in Marienwerder, and the county of Kulm government office; budgets and tax lists, approved by the Jewish community council, with government acknowledgments from the Briesen magistrate and the provincial regional office in Marienwerder; communal minutes/decisions, 1884-1885; a draft tax list, circa 1885; and internal correspondence of the Jewish Community of Briesen, including a petition, December 1884, from community members wishing to speak at the Jewish community representatives' meeting to protest the planned tax collection. The tax list (Repartition) for 1883/84 contains 104 names, and that for 1884/85, 105 names. Leaves partially bound together with string, evidently part of what was once a bound volume. 33 leaves.

 
2 23 Haushalt-Etat der Synagogen-Gemeinde Briesen pro 1 April 1885 bis ultimo März 1886
Budget of the Jewish Community of Briesen for 1 April 1885 to March 1886
1885
  

Budget and communal tax list (Steuer-Erhebeliste; 112 names), approved by the Jewish community council, with government acknowledgments from the Briesen magistrate, the county of Kulm (regarding Jewish community members residing outside of Briesen), and the provincial regional office in Marienwerder. Accompanied by cover letter from the Marienwerder office, October 1885, upon return of the approved budget plan, and a letter from the Kulm office, April 1885, concerning the incomes of Jewish community members residing outside of Briesen. 9 leaves.

 
2 24 Haushaltungs-Plan pro 1895/96
Budget plan for 1895/96
1895-1896
  

Approved by the Jewish community council, with government acknowledgments from the Briesen magistrate and the provincial regional office in Marienwerder. Tax list (Heberolle), dated 1895, has 116 names. An accompanying loose note, dated February 1896, by the Jewish community treasurer, concerns the communal tax assessment for member Simon Salomon. Bound volume. 5 leaves.

 
2 25 Haushalt und Heberolle der Synagogen-Gemeinde Briesen pro 1 April 1896 bis ultimo März 1897
Budget and tax list of the Jewish Community of Briesen for 1 April 1896 to March 1897
1896
  

Approved by the Jewish community council, with government acknowledgments from the Briesen magistrate and the provincial regional office in Marienwerder. Tax list has 110 names. 5 leaves.

 
2 26 Haushalt und Heberolle der Synagogen-Gemeinde Briesen pro 1897/98
Budget and tax list of the Jewish Community of Briesen for 1897/98
1897
  

Two copies of the budget plan, including budget and tax list (109 names), both copies approved by the Jewish community council, with government acknowledgments from the Briesen magistrate and the provincial regional office in Marienwerder, one labeled "Hauptausfertigung" (main copy), the other "Nebenausfertigung" (secondary copy); and and cover letter from the Marienwerder office, October 1897, upon return of the approved budget plan, with three enclosures. 17 leaves.

 
2 27 Income list and preliminary budget plan for 1897/98 1897
  

List of members with incomes (Veranlagungsrolle; 112 names); preliminary copy of the budget and tax list (110 names), undated and without signatures; and a second, partial copy of the budget. 12 leaves. For the official version of the budget plan for 1897/1898, see Folder 26.

 
2 28 Haushalt und Heberolle der Synagogen-Gemeinde Briesen pro 1898/99
Budget and tax list of the Jewish Community of Briesen for 1898/99
1898
  

Approved by the Jewish community council, with government acknowledgments from the Briesen magistrate and the provincial regional office in Marienwerder. Tax list has 108 names. 6 leaves.

 
2 29 Etat
Budget
1899-1902
  

Budget plans, with budgets and tax lists, for 1899/1900, 1900/1901, 1901/1902, and 1902/1903, all approved by the Jewish community council, with government acknowledgments from the Briesen magistrate and the provincial regional office in Marienwerder, and accompanied by a cover letter from the Marienwerder office upon return of the approved document. Number of names on tax lists as follows: 1899/1900: 98 names; 1900/1901: 113 names; 1901/1902: 112 names; and 1901/1902: 112 names. The plans are bound in reverse chronological order. Bound volume.

 
2 30 Repr. Vorlagen – Etat
Representatives' documents – Budget
1899-1902
  

Unofficial copies or drafts of budget plans and tax lists; related correspondence with the Kulm county government; one set of communal minutes/decisions; and internal correspondence of the Jewish Community of Briesen. Pertains to the following budget plans. For 1899/1900, budget portion only. For 1900/1901, budget and communal tax list (114 names), dated May 1900. Also, two additional copies of the budget portion only (one designated as a draft), a letter to the county of Kulm, April 1900, seeking tax information for Jewish community members residing outside of Briesen, with responses noted, and two undated lists of names and amounts (apparently a partial draft tax list). For 1901/1902, communal minutes, March 1901, concerning the tax list for that year, with an undated list of names and amounts (apparently a partial draft tax list), and an item with exchanges between the treasurer and the executive of the Jewish Community of Briesen, concerning corrections to a budget form for printing, as well as the tax assessment for community member Riesenburger. For 1902/1903, draft of the budget portion only, and correspondence with the Kulm county office, April 1902, seeking tax information for Jewish community members residing outside of Briesen, with responses noted. In an original Briesen Jewish Community file cover. 30 leaves. For the official versions of the budget plans in this time period, see Folder 29.

 
BoxFolderTitleDate
3 31 Haushaltplan der jüdischen Gemeindekasse Briesen pro 1903/04
Budget plan of the Jewish community treasury Briesen for 1903/04
1903
  

Preliminary budget and tax list, undated and without signatures, with penciled notes and corrections. Tax list of 95 names. 5 leaves.

 
3 32 Etat der jüdischen Gemeindekasse Briesen 1907
Budget of the Jewish community treasury Briesen 1907
1907
  

Budget and tax list for 1907/1908, approved by the Jewish community council, with government acknowledgments from the Briesen magistrate and the provincial regional office in Marienwerder, accompanied by a cover letter from the Marienwerder office upon return of the approved document. Tax list of 82 names. 7 leaves.

 
3 33 Etat der jüdischen Gemeindekasse Briesen 1908
Budget of the Jewish community treasury Briesen 1908
1908
  

Budget and tax list for 1908/1909, approved by the Jewish community council, with government acknowledgments from the Briesen magistrate and the provincial regional office in Marienwerder. Tax list has 79 names. 6 leaves.

 
3 34 Etat der jüdischen Gemeindekasse Briesen 1912
Budget of the Jewish community treasury Briesen 1912
1912
  

Preliminary budget and tax list for 1912/1913, with signatures of the community executive and chair of representatives, but no government acknowledgments. Tax list has 86 names. Also includes a draft of the budget portion only, and a copy of two outgoing letters one sheet, dated February 1912, one addressed to Lehmann in Lissewo, concerning Jewish community members there, and the other addressed to the Kulm county income tax assessment commission, concerning tax information for members living in Lissewo and Dombrowken. 18 leaves.

 
3 35 Etat der jüdischen Gemeindekasse Briesen 1913
Budget of the Jewish community treasury Briesen 1913
1913
  

Budget and tax list (85 names) for 1913/1914, approved by the Jewish community council, with government acknowledgments from the Briesen magistrate and the provincial regional office in Marienwerder, along with a cover letter from the Marienwerder office, June 1913, upon return of the approved document, with return of eight enclosures dated March to June 1913. 16 leaves.

 
3 36 Etat der jüdischen Gemeindekasse Briesen 1914
Budget of the Jewish community treasury Briesen 1914
1914
  

Budget and tax list (84 names) for 1914/1915, approved by the Jewish community council, with government acknowledgments from the Briesen magistrate and the provincial regional office in Marienwerder, accompanied by a cover letter from the Marienwerder office, June 1914, upon return of the approved document, with return of two enclosures dated March 1914. Also includes a second, incomplete copy of the budget, with the tax list portion blank. 16 leaves.

 
3 37 Etat der jüdischen Gemeindekasse Briesen 1915
Budget of the Jewish community treasury Briesen 1915
1915
  

Budget and tax list (70 names) for 1915/1916, approved by the Jewish community council, with government acknowledgments from the Briesen magistrate and the provincial regional office in Marienwerder, accompanied by a cover letter from the Marienwerder office, May 1915, upon return of the approved document, with four enclosures dated March to May. 12 leaves.

 
3 38 Haushaltungsplan der jüdischen Gemeindekasse Briesen 1916
Budget plan of the Jewish community treasury Briesen 1916
1916-1917
  

Budget and tax list (73 names) for 1916/1917, approved by the Jewish community council, with government acknowledgments from the Briesen magistrate and the provincial regional office in Marienwerder, accompanied by a cover letter from the Marienwerder office, June 1916, upon return of the approved document, with three enclosures dated March to May. One of the latter enclosures (a Jewish community meeting circular) has on the verso a copy of a letter from the community to the Marienwerder office, May 1917, concerning submission of the budget for 1917/1918. At the back of the budget plan booklet is a list of communal assets ("Vermögensbestand der Synagogengemeinde"), giving further details on 13 bequests and holdings of war bonds. 12 leaves.

 
3 39 Synagogen-Gemeinde Briesen, Haushaltungsplan 1918
Jewish Community of Briesen, budget plan 1918
1918
  

Budget and tax list (83 names) for 1918/1919, approved by the Jewish community council, with government acknowledgments from the Briesen magistrate and the provincial regional office in Marienwerder, accompanied by cover letter from the Marienwerder office, May 1918, upon return of the approved document, with four enclosures, dated March to May. 12 leaves.

 
3 40 Etat etc. (No. 105)
Budget etc.
1886-1887, 1892, 1906
  

Miscellaneous materials concerning several different budget plans, as follows. 1886/1887: Correspondence with Kulm county, April 1886, concerning the tax assessments of Jewish community members residing outside of Briesen. 1887/1888: cover letter from the Marienwerder provincial regional office, in June, that would have enclosed the approved tax list for that year (enclosure not included); and minutes of a Jewish community representatives' meeting in July pertaining to the budget for 1887/1888 (because of the departure of several members, the meeting fell below the quorum and could not proceed). 1892/1893: Jewish community representatives' meeting notice (circular), April 1892, along with minutes for the corresponding meeting, on May 1, at which the budget plan was to be reviewed (that agenda was postponed). 1906/1907: Cover letter from the Marienwerder office, May 1906, that would have enclosed the approved budget plan (enclosure not included). In an original Briesen Jewish Community file cover. Loose documents (6 items).

 
3 41 Etat etc. (No. 105)
Budget etc.
1911, 1917
  

Miscellaneous materials concerning two different budget plans, as follows. 1911/1912: Letter to Kulm county, with response on verso, and copy of letter to the Marienwerder provincial regional office. 1917/1918: Letter to Kulm county, with response on verso; four community council meeting notices (circulars); and two sets of community council minutes, May-July 1917. In an original Briesen Jewish Community file cover. Loose documents (9 items).

 

Subseries 2: Communal tax collection ledgers, 1890-1901, 1908-1919

10 folders
Arrangement:

Arranged chronologically.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains ledgers that were used to record community members' periodic payments of communal taxes in the course of the year, generally on a quarterly basis; the records cover the period 1890 to 1919, with gaps. Except for Folder 42, which contains a list for one particular quarter of the fiscal year 1890/1891, the items in this subseries are all ledger volumes containing the records of tax collection for the entire given fiscal year. Community members are listed by name and profession. Insofar as these ledgers contain an unofficial copy of the Jewish community tax list, they complement the tax lists found in Subseries II.1 (Budget plans), above, as a documentation of community membership in certain years.

BoxFolderTitleDate
3 42 Communal tax collection for 1890/91 1890 August
  

Loose document (2 leaves). List of community members (97 names), with professions, and amount of second quarter tax contributions due, with instructions from community executive chair Wessolowski to community attendant Salomon, to proceed with collection. Includes notes indicating those paid, running totals, and list of members with amounts still unpaid.

 
BoxFolderTitleDate
4 43 Synagogen-Beitraege Hebe-Rolle pro Rechnungsjahr 1894/95
Jewish community tax roll for fiscal year 1894/95
1894-1895
  

Communal tax list (120 names), with record of contributions; and correspondence from the community executive to the treasurer bound in at back (5 items). Tax list on oversize two-page spreads (16-1/2 x 21 inches), with columns for name, profession, quarterly/annual amount assessed, and amounts paid quarterly; includes interim and sum totals. The correspondence concerns tax assessments of certain members and the review of the accounts by the audit committee. Bound volume. 14 leaves.

 
4 44 Steuer-Hebe-Rolle pro 1896/1897
Tax roll for 1896/1897
1896-1897
  

Communal tax list (111 names), with record of contributions, on oversize two-page spreads (16-1/2 x 21 inches), with columns for name, profession, quarterly/annual amount assessed, and amounts paid quarterly; includes list of back contributions owed, and interim and sum totals. Bound volume. 8 leaves.

 
4 45 Synagogen-Beiträge Heberolle pro 1896/97
Jewish community tax roll for 1896/97
1896-1897
  

Not identical with the volume in the previous folder (different order of names as well as different information); appears incomplete, with recording of payments ending in fall 1896. Communal tax list (111 names), with record of contributions, on oversize two-page spreads (16-1/2 x 21 inches), with columns for name, profession, quarterly/annual amount assessed, and amounts paid quarterly; includes interim and sum totals. On last page is a list of amounts collected and submitted (abgeliefert). Bound volume. 9 leaves.

 
4 46 Gemeindesteuer Hebe-Rolle für das Rechnungsjahr 1899/1900
Communal tax roll for fiscal year 1899/1900
1899-1900
  

Communal tax list (101 names), with record of contributions, on oversize two-page spreads (16-1/2 x 21 inches), with columns for name, profession, quarterly/annual amount assessed, and amounts paid quarterly; includes interim and sum totals. Also includes a list of amounts collected and submitted in each quarter ("Ablieferungen zur Kasse"). Bound volume. 8 leaves.

 
4 47 Gemeindesteuer-Hebe-Rolle für das Rechnungsjahr 1900
Communal tax roll for fiscal year 1900
1900-1901
  

Communal tax list (120 names) for 1900/1901, with record of contributions, on oversize two-page spreads (16-1/2 x 21 inches), with columns for name, profession, quarterly/annual amount assessed, and amounts paid quarterly; includes interim and sum totals. Affixed to one page is a letter from the community executive to the treasurer concerning the contributions of a particular member in Lissewo. Bound volume. 10 leaves.

 
4 48 Steuer-Einziehungs-Liste pro 1908/09
Tax collection list for 1908/09
1908-1909
  

Communal tax list (86 names), with record of contributions, on oversize two-page spreads (16-1/2 x 21 inches), with columns for name, profession, quarterly/annual amount assessed, and amounts paid quarterly; includes interim and sum totals. Also includes a list of amounts collected and submitted in each quarter, and six small receipts (affixed at back), for payments received through the mail from members in Lissewo and Dombrowken. Kept by synagogue attendant Guth. Bound volume. 8 leaves.

 
4 49 Gemeindesteuer Liste für 1911/12
Communal tax list for 1911/12
1911-1912
  

Communal tax list (94 names), with record of contributions, on oversize two-page spreads (16-1/2 x 21 inches), with columns for name, profession, quarterly/annual amount assessed, and amounts paid quarterly; includes interim and sum totals. Included are four loose receipts for payments received through the mail from members in Lissewo and Dombrowken. Kept by synagogue attendant Guth. 8 leaves.

 
4 50 Gemeindesteuer Liste für 1912
Communal tax list for 1912
1912-1913
  

Communal tax list (99 names) for 1912/1913, with record of contributions, on oversize two-page spreads (16-1/2 x 21 inches), with columns for name, profession, quarterly/annual amount assessed, and amounts paid quarterly; includes interim and sum totals. Affixed to one page is a small receipt for a payment received through the mail from a member in Lissewo. 10 leaves.

 
4 51 Steuerhebeliste Etatsjahr 1918/19
Tax list for budget year 1918/19
1918-1919
  

Communal tax list (81 names), with record of contributions, on two-page spreads, with columns for name, profession, quarterly/annual amount assessed, and amounts paid quarterly. Includes a list of those leaving the community ("Abgänge"), and interim and sum totals. Two envelopes pasted to the front and one to the back inside cover contain a few receipts that were voided, returned, or still to be given out, including four small receipts for payments received through the mail from members in Lissewo and Dombrowken. Bound volume. 9 leaves.

 

Subseries 3: Audit-related records and account books, 1884-1895, 1911-1921

6 folders
Arrangement:

This subseries contains records pertaining to the audit committee (Revisions-Commission), and audits of the community accounts, dated 1884 to 1889, and 1895; and a few community account books in the period 1911 to 1921. Included are audit committee reports (Folders 52-53), expense journals (Folders 54-55), one volume of monthly balance sheets (Folder 56), and one ledger for which the purpose could not be specifically determined (Folder 57).

Scope and Content:

BoxFolderTitleDate
5 52 Audit committee 1884-1889
  

Minutes/decisions and internal correspondence of the Briesen Jewish Community Council, including community executive requests to the representatives' assembly to elect an audit committee and circulars calling meetings of the audit committee; audit committee reports for 1883/1884, 1885/1886 (partial), and 1888/1889; and treasurer's year-end report (Jahres-Abschluss) for 1887/1888. Two loose items dated 1889 are inserted at the back of the volume. Leaves at front partially loose; at least one leaf appears to be missing (p. 4-5 of the audit report dated April 1885). Bound volume with fragmentary front cover. 37 leaves.

 
5 53 Rechnungsrevisionsprotokolle
Report of financial statement audit
1895
  

Report of the audit of Jewish communal treasury for year 1894/1895 carried out by the audit committee of the Jewish community council; and letter to the community executive from Jacob Meyer, member of the audit committee and chair of the representatives' assembly. The committee consisted of Meyer and Alex Harris. The final report is dated May 5, with marginal notes dated May 8. Meyer's letter, dated in April, while the audit was still in process, concerns certain account books the committee had not yet seen; on the verso is the response of community executive chair Bauer. Bound volume. 4 leaves.

 
5 54 Ausgabe Journal der jüdischen Gemeindekasse Briesen für das Rechnungsjahr 1911
Expense journal of the Jewish community treasury Briesen for fiscal year 1911
1911-1912
  

Cashbook/journal of expenses for 1911/1912, entered in a printed form (two-page spread), with columns for date, name, description, amount, and budget categories. Includes totals for each spread and sum totals at the end. Signed by treasurer Kannowski, April 1912. The budget categories include salaries, interest and reduction of principal ("Zinsen und Kapitalabtragungen"; i.e. on loan/debt obligations), building repairs/insurance, congregational expenses (Synagogenbedarf), administrative expenses, mikveh administration, and charitable aid. Bound volume. 14 leaves.

 
5 55 Expense journal for year 1912/1913 1912-1913
  

Cashbook/journal of expenses, entered in a printed form (two-page spread) identical to that found in the volume in Folder 54, with running totals and sum totals at the end; probably in the same hand, but without a signature, or any indication of official responsible. Bound volume. 14 leaves.

 
5 56 Bilanzen und Generalbilanzen für die Synagogengemeinde Briesen
Preliminary and final balance sheets for the Jewish Community of Briesen
1918-1919
  

Preliminary (Probebilanz) and final balance sheets (Generalbilanz), monthly, from April 1918 through August 1919, with only the preliminary version in August 1919. Bound volume. 18 leaves.

 
5 57 Ledger 1918-1921
  

Ledger possibly recording adjustments, referring to debits and credits from and to certain funds; the entries are cross-referenced to the main community account books, with notations in the margins of numbered entries in the journal ("J") and Hauptbuch ("HB"), or general ledger. Bound volume. 46 numbered pages.

 

Subseries 4: Supporting documents for annual financial statements, 1886-1919

15 folders
Arrangement:

Arranged chronologically.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains records documenting approval of expenses by the Briesen Jewish Community Council, in the period 1886 to 1919, with gaps; and, in one instance, a volume documenting both income and expenses, in the fiscal year 1911/1912 (Folder 68). The records include pay orders or (in the case of income) orders to register income; general instructions to the treasurer, authorizing certain recurring payments as approved by the community council; receipts from community employees for salary payments received; receipts from the Briesen municipal government for taxes paid; and various other documentation of expenses paid, sometimes with communal decisions noted.

The majority of these materials are in bound volumes organized in the community, and labeled in German as "Ausgabe-Beläge" (supporting documents for expenses) with the individual documents sequentially numbered. These supporting documents would presumably have been referenced by number in the community's annual financial statement submitted to the government, although the present collection does not contain any of the actual financial statements. In contrast, the next subseries, Subseries II.5, Invoices/receipts, contains volumes typically labeled in German simply "Rechnungen" (invoices), containing invoices documented as paid, but without direct correlation to the approvals of the Briesen Jewish Community Council. To the extent that the fiscal years represented overlap, the two subseries complement each other, with invoices in Subseries 5 typically corresponding to pay orders in Subseries 4 that show the authorization of the expenses by the community council.

BoxFolderTitleDate
5 58 Expenses – Supporting documents for 1886/87 1886-1887
  

Communal decisions/approvals, invoices/receipts, petitions for aid, and correspondence. The latter items are dated March 1886 to January 1887; two loose items inserted at the back of the volume (an internal memo and a meeting notice), dated June 1887, relate to a meeting of the audit committee, chaired by L. Lewin, to review the accounts for year 1886/1887. One item is a note and invoice from attorney Gimkiewicz, Thorn, for work related to the school accounts. Another is a Jewish community council decision to present teacher Stern with a gift on the occasion of his 25th anniversary as a teacher, as proposed by community executive chair Littmann, who notes that Stern had recently been honored and presented with gifts at an anniversary celebration organized by the town and various committees that had formed for the occasion. Bound volume. 37 leaves.

 
5 59 Expenses – Supporting documents for 1888/89 (1 of 2) 1888
  

Dated April to December 1888. Invoices/receipts; three circulars to representatives concerning authorization of expenses; petitions for aid; letter from Rabbi J. Münz (applicant) for travel reimbursement; and communal decisions. The circulars concern travel expenses for rabbis Auerbach and Wolff, who were applicants for the community's rabbi position, and reimbursement to Cantor Blaustein for hosting rabbi applicants. Includes a communal decision concerning funds for the feeding of Jewish soldiers. Several of the invoices bear notes about communal approval for payment, with signatures of representatives. Approximately 22 leaves. Remnants of binding with string, lacking covers.

 
5 60 Expenses – Supporting documents for 1888/89 (2 of 2) 1889
  

Dated January to April 1889. Petitions for aid, and invoices/receipts. The petitions and, in some instances, invoices have communal decisions/approval noted. One invoice bears a date of August 1888 but is marked as approved for payment in March 1889. Bound with string and glue, lacking covers. 16 leaves.

 
5 61 Ausgabe-Belaege der jüdischen Gemeindekasse Briesen pro Rechnungsjahr 1894/95
Supporting documents for expenses, of the Jewish community treasury Briesen, for fiscal year 1894/95
1893-1895
  

Pay orders, receipts, and paid invoices, accompanied by two letters from the community executive to treasurer Kannowski, in November 1893 and June 1894, concerning salary payments. Items are numbered, in pencil, 1 to 157. Bound volume.

 
5 62 Ausgabe-Belaege der jüdischen Gemeindekasse Briesen pro Rechnungsjahr 1895/96
Supporting documents for expenses, of the Jewish community treasury Briesen, for fiscal year 1895/96
1895-1896
  

Pay orders, receipts, and paid invoices, accompanied by a letter from the community executive to treasurer Kannowski, October 1895, concerning a salary payment. Pay orders are numbered 1 to 91, plus one pay order numbered 11 from year 1896/1897, noted as belonging to year 1894/1895. Bound volume.

 
5 63 Ausgabe-Belaege der jüdischen Gemeindekasse Briesen für das Rechnungsjahr 1900
Supporting documents for expenses, of the Jewish community treasury Briesen, for fiscal year 1900
1900-1901
  

Pay orders, receipts, and paid invoices for 1900/01, accompanied by a letter from the community executive to treasurer Kannowski, August 1900, concerning salary payments. Pay orders are numbered 1 to 132. Bound volume.

 
5 64 Ausgabe-Belaege der Kasse der Synagogengemeinde Briesen für das Rechnungsjahr 1903/04
Supporting documents for expenses, of the Jewish community treasury Briesen, for fiscal year 1903/04
1903-1904
  

Pay orders, receipts, and paid invoices, accompanied by letters from the community executive to treasurer Kannowski (no. 1 to 6), mostly concerning salary payments. One item (no. 2) is a report on income and expenses for the fund for aid to non-resident poor, for year 1902/1903, from Rabbi Eppenstein, the fund's treasurer, forwarded from the community executive to community treasurer Kannowski, with a directive to register the remaining balance as income in the communal treasury. Items are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 217. Bound volume.

 
5 65 Ausgabe-Beläge der Synagogenkasse Briesen für das Rechnungsjahr 1904/05
Supporting documents for expenses, of the Jewish community treasury Briesen, for fiscal year 1904/05
1904-1905
  

Pay orders, receipts, and paid invoices, accompanied by two letters from the community executive to treasurer Kannowski, in August and October 1904, concerning salary payments. Includes documentation of a loan (Schuldschein), dated Briesen, 1898, in the name of Sally Bernstein, co-signed by Max Jacobsohn and Julius Callmann, with amortization table for repayment over years 1898 to 1904, together with the receipt for the final payment on the loan, dated January 1905 (toward the back of the volume, with a second copy of the amortization table at the front). Pay orders are numbered 1 to 127. Bound volume.

 
BoxFolderTitleDate
6 66 Beläge zum Ausgabe-Journal der jüdischen Gemeindekasse Briesen für das Rechnungsjahr 1905/06
Supporting documents for expenses, of the Jewish community treasury Briesen, for fiscal year 1905/06
1905-1906
  

Pay orders, receipts, and paid invoices, accompanied by a letter from the community executive to treasurer Kannowski, October 1905, concerning a temporary monthly support payment to be made to recently retired community assistant Jacobsohn. Pay orders are numbered 1 to 194. Bound volume.

 
6 67 Ausgabe-Belaege der jüdischen Gemeindekasse Briesen pro Rechnungsjahr 1910
Supporting documents for expenses, of the Jewish community treasury Briesen, for fiscal year 1910
1910-1911
  

Pay orders, receipts, and paid invoices for 1910/11, accompanied by a list of regular payments to be made by the treasurer, without individual pay orders, as directed by the community executive, under the 1910/1911 budget, dated April 1910, and a letter of general instructions (Generalanweisung) from the community executive to treasurer Kannowski, April 1910. The pay orders, receipts, and paid invoices are numbered 1 to 207. Bound volume.

 
6 68 Einnahme- und Ausgabe-Beläge der Synagogenkasse Briesen für 1911/12
Supporting documents for income and expenses, of the Jewish community treasury Briesen, for fiscal year 1911/1912
1911-1912
  

Pay orders, receipts, and paid invoices, accompanied by a list of regular payments to be made by the treasurer ("General-Anweisung für die Kasse") without individual pay orders, as directed by the community executive, under the 1911/1912 budget, dated April 1911; nine orders to register income (Einnahme-Anweisung); and a letter from the community executive to treasurer Kannowski, October 1911, concerning the ending of rabbi Eppenstein's contract in November. Pay orders are numbered 1 to 124. Bound volume.

 
6 69 Ausgabe-Belaege der jüdischen Gemeindekasse Briesen für das Rechnungsjahr 1912/13
Supporting documents for expenses, of the Jewish community treasury Briesen, for fiscal year 1912/13
1912-1913
  

Pay orders, receipts, and paid invoices, accompanied by a list of regular payments to be made by the treasurer without individual pay orders, as directed by the community executive, under the 1912/1913 budget (no. 1); and letters from the community executive to the treasurer (no. 2-4), concerning salary or other compensation payments. Items are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 210. Bound volume.

 
6 70 Expenses – Supporting documents for 1914/15 1914
  

List of regular payments to be made by the treasurer without individual pay orders, as directed by the community executive, under the 1914/1915 budget (2 leaves); and a note, dated June 1914, related to the instructions for one particular payment in the list (interest payments on a loan). Loose documents (2 items).

 
6 71 Expenses – Supporting documents for 1915/16 and 1916/17 1915-1916
  

Loose document (1 item). List of regular payments to be made by the treasurer without individual pay orders, as directed by the community executive, under the 1915/1916 budget (2 leaves). Evidently used as a draft for the 1916/1917 instructions: in the title, the year 1915 has been crossed out and 1916 penciled in; and the content also shows some emendations.

 
6 72 Expenses – Supporting documents for 1918/19 1918-1919
  

Pay orders numbered 1 to 58. In the original commercial file cover "Briefhefter Fortschritt."

 

Subseries 5: Invoices/receipts, 1883-1919

12 folders
Arrangement:

Arranged chronologically.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains invoices for goods or services billed to the community, typically signed by the party owed with an acknowledgment that the amount was received, or accompanied by a receipt for payment sent. This subseries is closely related to Subseries II.4, which contains supporting documentation of communal expenses for annual financial statements. Most of the present invoices are in volumes that were prepared in the community, and are usually, although not always, organized according to the fiscal year. (The exceptions are Folders 74 and 76, which seem to be based on the calendar year, both beginning in January; and Folder 75 contains various loose invoices that were not part of any bound volume.) To the extent that the fiscal years represented overlap, the two subseries complement each other, with invoices in the present subseries typically corresponding in Subseries 4 to pay orders showing the authorization of the expense by the community council. In fiscal year 1904/1905, for example, the 127 numbered invoices found in Folder 78, below, correspond to 127 numbered pay orders found in Folder 65, in Subseries 4.

BoxFolderTitleDate
6 73 Invoices/receipts 1883-1884
  

Dated September 1883 to January 1884, mostly pertaining to repair and maintenance work. One invoice is for a silk-embroidered bridal item ("Brautdeckchen") from the firm Isidor & Rosalie Reiter, Breslau. German title taken from fragmentary flag affixed to inside back cover (the piece bearing the title is detached). Bound volume. 10 leaves.

 
6 74 Invoices/receipts 1889, 1891, 1893
  

Dated January to November 1893, except for one item, a request from Jacob Salomon, dated December 1891, with communal decision noted, pertaining to an error in the amount charged for the burial of his mother, Rachel Salomon, in 1889, with accompanying receipt from that time. Several other items are also related to burials, of Mrs. Salomon and a child (both in July 1893) and Max Goetz (February 1893). 41 leaves. Bound volume.

 
6 75 Invoices/receipts 1891-1894
  

Includes an invoice and receipt for payment sent, regarding an advertisement for assistant cantor (Hilfsvorbeter) in the publication Der jüdische Cantor, Bromberg, 1891; a fragment of an invoice from a locksmith, 1893; and 14 invoices from 1894, all with signed acknowledgments of payment received. One invoice, from Herrmann Wessolowski, is for delivery of oil and petroleum in fiscal year 1893/1894. One invoice/receipt, from the firm H. Rosenkranz, Posen, on a card, has an advertisement for the firm on the verso, in both German and Polish. Two invoices are from Max Abraham, carpenter, for caskets (Hebrew: aron), for Mrs. Simon and for a small child of the Joelsohn family. Loose documents (16 items).

 
6 76 Rechnungen 1895/96
Invoices/receipts for 1895/96
1895-1896
  

Dated January 1895 to April 1896. Some invoices have notation of communal approval for payment, and some have signed acknowledgments of the vendor for payment received. Several items are related to burials, of Mr. Braun (no. 18, 21), Mr. Pottlitzer and Mrs. Goetz (both, no. 30-31), Mr. Oschitzki (no. 49-51), Mr. Michalowitz (no. 54), and Mrs. S. Ascher (no. 64, and unnumbered invoice from Max Abraham). Items are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 64, with five additional loose items inserted at the back of the volume. Bound volume.

 
6 77 Rechnungen 1902
Invoices/receipts 1902
1902-1903
  

Pertains to fiscal year 1902/1903. Includes a letter from community executive chair Callmann to L. Silberberg concerning distribution of matzot at Passover, with a list of nine recipients (no. 9); invoice from M. Wittenberg for esrogim, lulavim, and hadassim (no. 52); dues notification/receipt for dues to the Deutsch-Israelitische Gemeindebund (no. 60); a petition from Fr. Moritz Ascher regarding tax assessment (no. 65); and an invoice for a stamp for the community saying "kosher" in Hebrew characters (no. 99). German title taken from flag affixed to inside front cover. Items are numbered, in blue or plain pencil, 1 to 100, with gaps; the following numbers are missing: 5-7, 11, 16, 20, 23-24, 28, 31, 35, 40-41, 44, 46, 48-49, 51, 54-56, 62, 64, 70, 83, 92, and 96. One item at back appears to be labeled as no. 100 for year 1901/1902, dated April 1902. In the original commercial file cover "Stolzenberger Schnell-Hefter."

 
6 78 Rechnungen (Quittungen) 1904
Invoices/receipts 1904
1904-1905
  

Pertains to fiscal year 1904/1905. Includes invoice from S. Simon for distribution of matzot to poor members at Passover, with a list of eight recipients (no. 5); documentation of a donation to the Casper Lachmann orphanage in Graudenz (no. 18) and of dues payments to the Verband der westpreussischen Synagogen-Gemeinden (no. 29) and the Ausschuss des Verbandes der Deutschen Juden (no. 57); and invoice from Cantor H. Nelken for esrogim, lulavim, and myrtle (no.70). Items are numbered, in blue or purple pencil, 1 to 127 (the absence of no. 125 and 126 is explained with a notation on no. 127). In the original commercial file cover "Stolzenberger Schnell-Hefter."

 
BoxFolderTitleDate
7 79 Rechnungen 1905
Invoices/receipts 1905
1905-1906
  

Pertains to fiscal year 1905/1906. Includes an approval of an amendment to the community fire insurance policy (no. 22) that details the location of community property during a building renovation, apparently of the synagogue, in May to October 1905; documentation of dues payments to the Verband der westpreussischen Synagogen-Gemeinden (no. 29) and the Ausschuss des Verbandes der Deutschen Juden (no. 55); and an invoice from Cantor H. Nelken for esrogim, lulavim, and hadassim (no. 67). Items are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 131. In the original commercial file cover "Stolzenberger Schnell-Hefter."

 
7 80 Rechnungen 1907/08
Invoices/receipts for 1907/08
1907-1908
  

Includes invoice from S. Simon for distribution of matzot to poor members at Passover, with a list of six recipients (no. 6); receipt for matzot money given to Rabbi Eppenstein, H. Nelken, and Nathan Wohlgemuth (no. 1-3); receipt from Max Abraham related to the burial of the wife of tailor Meyer, April 1907 (no. 12); documentation of dues payments to the Verband der westpreussischen Synagogen-Gemeinden (no.18) and the Deutsch-Israeltische Gemeindebund (no. 24); and an invoice from Cantor H. Nelken for esrogim, lulavim, and myrtle (no. 58). Items are numbered, in blue or plain pencil, 1 to 117. In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner."

 
7 81 Rechnungen 1909/10 (No. 102)
Invoices/receipts 1909/10
1909-1910
  

Includes invoice from S. Simon, for delivery of matzot (no. 6), followed by several receipts for distribution of matzot (no. 5?); documentation of dues payment to the Deutsch-Israelitische Gemeindeverband (no. 30) and the Ausschuss des Verbandes der Deutschen Juden (no. 80); documentation of donations to the Casper Lachmann orphanage in Graudenz (no. 4), a committee of the Central-Verein deutscher Staatsbürger jüdischen Glaubens, concerning opposition to a ban on ritual slaughter (no. 33), and the Israelitische Erziehungsanstalt zu Ahlem bei Hannover (between no. 118 and 119). Items are numbered, mostly in blue pencil, 1 to 135. In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner."

 
7 82 Rechnungen 1912/13 (No. 102)
Invoices/receipts 1912/13
1912-1914
  

The expense items include documentation of dues to the Deutsch-Israelitischer Gemeindebund (no. 4), the Verband der westpreussischen Synagogen-Gemeinden (no. 15), and Ausschuss des Verbandes der Deutschen Juden (no. 45); and various donations (no. 14-15). Items are numbered, in blue pencil, 1 to 114. Also includes two unnumbered items: a letter from the audit committee (Harris and Wolff), March 1914, to the community executive, reporting on the completion of the audit of accounts for the year 1912/1913, along with an undated order to register interest income from the Joachimsthal bequest. In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner," custom printed for the records of the Jewish Community of Briesen.

 
7 83 Invoices/receipts for 1918/19 (1 of 2) 1918-1919
  

Dated April 1918 to April 1919. Includes two appeal letters from the Rabbinerverband in Deutschland (no. 43, 65); two items from the Verband der deutschen Juden, one concerning dues (no. 116) and the other (no. 123) concerning the Verband der jüdischen Lehrervereine; documentation of dues paid to the Rabbiner-Seminar, Berlin (no. 124); a letter from the Provinzialkasse der Wanderarmenfürsorge der Provinz Westpreussen (no. 126); and a report (3 leaves) of the Zentralwohlfahrtsstelle der deutschen Juden, circa 1919 (no. 153). Items are numbered, in pencil or ink, 1 to 169. In the original commercial file cover "Briefhefter Fortschritt."

 
7 84 Rechnungen 1918/19
Invoices/receipts for 1918/19 (2 of 2)
1918-1919
  

Dated April 1918 to January 1919. Includes dues paid to the Verband der Westpreussischen Synagogengemeinden (no. 8) and the Deutsch-Israelitischer Gemeindebund (no. 21). Items are numbered, in pencil, 1 to 58. In the original commercial file cover "Stella."

 
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Series III: Correspondence and other documents relating to general, charitable, and educational institutions, 1876, 1885-1921

In German, with occasional occurrence of Hebrew.
19 folders
Arrangement:

Files pertaining to charitable activities, and/or regional and national Jewish organizations, are followed by files pertaining to education, with a roughly chronological arrangement within the two groupings; and one file related to the Jewish Reading Society is found at the end of the series.

Scope and Content:

Some three quarters of the materials in this series pertain to the community's charitable activities in the period 1885 to 1921 (Folders 85-98), often in cooperation with regional and national Jewish organizations. Several files pertain to education (Folders 99-103), including the community's religious school, and Hebrew instruction, in 1897 (Folders 99-100); the support of religious instruction in the branch community of Lissewo (Lisewo), in 1903 (Folder 101); and the Jewish elementary school, mainly in 1906-1907 (Folder 102). Finally, one volume of records documents the activities of a local Jewish cultural society called the Jüdische Leseverein zu Briesen (Jewish Reading Society of Briesen), from its founding, in 1901, until 1908 (Folder 103), including membership lists, fliers for lectures and events, and the catalog of a small lending library. Other materials related to charitable activities and education can be found in the general files of communal meeting minutes and related correspondence in Series I.

The records on charitable activities mostly concern the Jewish migrant poor and other charitable causes outside of the community. Included are materials concerning a special communal fund established in the late 1880s to aid poor itinerant, or migrant Jews, who were only temporarily residing in Briesen and were not members of the Jewish Community of Briesen (Folder 85), and later on, the Provinzial-Kasse für jüdische Wanderarmenfürsorge der Provinz Westpreussen (Provincial fund for the aid of Jewish migrant poor in the province of West Prussia; Folder 96), founded in Thorn (Toruń) in 1910, under the auspices of the Deutsch-Israelitischer Gemeindebund; and in 1894, the community's response to appeals on behalf of expelled Russian Jews in the Russian-German border area, and cholera victims in a Russian Jewish community near the border (Folders 89-90, respectively). One file dating from just after the First World War contains appeals from a variety of Jewish organizations (Folder 98).

Only scattered items pertain to aid for community members, including a few petitions dated 1889-1897 (Folders 86-87); and, in 1920, correspondence with the community's Frauenverein, or Women's Association (in Folder 98), which performed charitable work. One file relates to the community council's honoring of the chair of the Frauenverein, in 1900, on the occasion of the association's 25th anniversary (Folder 91).

Jewish charitable activities on a regional and national basis are reflected in the community's correspondence with the Deutsch-Israelitischer Gemeindebund (German-Jewish Community Alliance; Folder 92), over the period 1902 to 1919; and, following the First World War, the Zentralwohlfahrtsstelle der deutschen Juden (Central Welfare Board of German Jews; Folder 98), which was founded 1917. One file contains a booklet of tickets related to distribution of matzot in 1917, during the First World War, under the auspices of the Zentrale für Mazzosversorgung (Center for provision of matzot) in Frankfurt am Main (Folder 97). There is also correspondence with the Caspar Lachmann Jewish orphanage (Folder 93), located in Graudenz (Grudziądz), some 30 kilometers northwest of Briesen, with its administrative seat in Danzig (Gdańsk); that institution was founded in 1903 by the Verband der Westpreussischen Synagogen-Gemeinde (Union of Jewish communities in the province of West Prussia).

Some materials in this series reflect not only charitable matters but collective German-Jewish issues and advocacy more generally, including a few items concerning defense of ritual slaughter against certain local and regional government measures, in 1893-1894 (Folder 88); an appeal from the Central-Verein deutscher Staatsbürger jüdischen Glaubens (Central Association of German Citizens of Jewish Faith) concerning anti-Semitism, in 1919 (contained in Folder 98); and correspondence with the Verband der deutschen Juden (Union of German Jews; Folder 94), from its founding, in 1904, until 1920. The latter file includes a mailing from the Verband in 1919 concerning communities in the areas ceded to Poland after the war.

BoxFolderTitleDate
7 85 Charitable aid for the migrant poor 1885-1888
  

Communal minutes/decisions pertaining to the dissolution of the Armen-Verein, in 1885, and subsequently the establishment and management of a special fund for aid for poor migrant Jews, who were only temporarily residing in Briesen ("durchziehende Arme," or poor people traveling through), also referred to as the non-resident poor ("auswärtige Armen"), since they were not members of the Jewish Community of Briesen; community executive authorizations of appropriations for the latter fund, with receipts signed by Wolf Salomon (as the fund's treasurer), for amounts received; and circular to the representatives, 1887, on the question of whether the special fund should be continued for budget year 1887/1888. Includes a letter from W. Salomon, May 3, 1885, to the community executive (loose document inserted following the first page), resigning from office as treasurer, presumably pertaining to the Armen-Verein (resignations of the treasurer and head of the Armen-Verein are noted in the communal minutes of May 4, 1885). Bound volume. 8 leaves.

 
7 86 Petition from Rabbi Eppenstein concerning divorce case 1889
  

Correspondence, meeting notices (circulars), and communal minutes/decisions. Rabbi Eppenstein's petition concerns funds to cover the costs for community member Oschitzky to obtain a proper Jewish divorce from his first wife, which he otherwise could not afford, so that he would be able, under Jewish law, to marry his present wife, with whom he had had only a civil marriage. Loose documents (5 items).

 
7 87 Petitions for aid from community members 1889, 1896-1897
  

Two petitions, in 1889 and 1896, have a communal decision noted; the other two, in 1897, do not appear to have been acted on, although one has a notation indicating it was received. Loose documents (4 items).

 
7 88 Defense of ritual slaughter 1893-1894
  

Two letters received, one with copy of response. The 1893 item, from the Jewish community of Berlin, includes the text of a petition it had submitted to Prussian officials, objecting to recent measures, in Harburg and Marienwerder, that directly or indirectly curtailed the right of Jews to practice ritual slaughter; a note indicates that the Briesen community wrote back expressing support for the petition. The 1894 item is from a Danzig representative of the Comite zur Abwehr des Antisemitismus (Committee for defense against anti-Semitism), Berlin, appealing for a contribution in support of a project that assembled expert opinions about ritual slaughter. Loose documents (2 items).

 
7 89 Charitable aid to Russian Jews 1894 April
  

Correspondence, receipt, and communal decisions. Letter from Rabbi Isaac Rülf, of Memel, on behalf of the Grenzcomité für die russischen Juden (Border committee to aid Russian Jews), 1894, with notation of communal decisions, accompanied by a postal receipt for money sent to Memel, and a postcard from Rabbi Rülf acknowledging the gift. Rabbi Rülf's letter highlights the situation of a group of 50 women, with children, among Jewish expellees (Vertriebenen) residing in border areas (Grenzorten). One decision is signed by the community executive, and the other is signed by members of the Frauenverein (Women's Association). Loose documents (3 items).

 
BoxFolderTitleDate
8 90 Unterstützung an Auswärtige
Charitable aid to individuals outside of the community
1894 August
  

Concerns collection of donations to aid hungering cholera victims in Dobrzyń (in Russian Poland), which was just across the border (the Drwęca river) from the Prussian town of Gollub. Collection list, with names and amounts donated; a postal receipt for money sent to Gollub; and a letter, with enclosed receipt, from the Jewish community of Gollub. The letter from Gollub expresses thanks for the aid given to their neighboring community, and is accompanied by a receipt from the aid committee of Dobrzyń, headed by Rabbi Dawid Taub (David Dov Ber Taub). The latter receipt, in German, has a Hebrew letter from Rabbi Taub on the verso, and bears his stamp on both sides. The collection list has the heading "Sammelliste für die durch die Cholera und Grenzeabsperrung sehr hart bedrängte, hungernde Glaubensgenossen unserer nächsten Grenzstadt Dobrzyn" (Collection list for our distressed, starving coreligionists of our nearest border town, Dobrzyń, who are beset by cholera and the effects of the border blockade), penned by the Gollub community on behalf of the Jews in Dobrzyń. Bound volume. 4 leaves.

 
8 91 Frauenverein – 25 jähriges Bestehen
Women's Association – 25th anniversary
1900
  

Correspondence with the Jewish community's Frauenverein (Women's Association), and internal correspondence of the Briesen Jewish Community Council, including: confidential meeting notice (circular) for a meeting of the council regarding the anniversary of the Frauenverein; undated draft letter to Rosalie Michalowitz, concerning her 25th anniversary as chair of the Frauenverein, on letterhead of Simon Ascher; letter from the Jewish community executive to the Jewish community representatives' assembly, with notation of communal decision; letter of invitation to a celebration honoring Michalowitz, addressed to the Jewish community council from the executive of the Frauenverein (M. Kiewe, A. Eppenstein); and a final and a draft copy of a letter of well wishes to Michalowitz, from the Jewish community council, dated March 1900, on the occasion of the anniversary. In the original commercial file cover "Stolzenberger Schnell-Hefter." German title taken from flag affixed to inside front cover. 6 items.

 
8 92 Deutsch-Israelitischer Gemeindebund (No. 126)
German-Jewish Community Alliance
1902-1903, 1908-1919
  

Correspondence with the DIGB and others; printed requests and announcements from the DIGB; postcard receipts for payment of dues; and a completed questionnaire (circa 1909), giving financial and educational statistics about the community. Correspondents include Rabbi Eppenstein and, later, Rabbi Neufeld (1917), who advise on matters related to the DIGB; attorney Blumenthal, Culm, who represents the community at a DIGB conference in Berlin in May 1909; the Jewish communities of Culmsee and Culm (April to May 1909), Thorn (May 1911), and Neumark (February, April 1912); and the Verband der westpreussischen Synagogen-Gemeinden (March 1912). Also includes a letter from the Rabbinerverband in Deutschland, concerning raising money for holiday meals for Jewish soldiers (apparently forwarded by Rabbi Neufeld, July 1918); and a letter from the Zentralwohlfahrtsstelle der deutschen Juden, shortly after its founding, in 1917, requesting information about a bequest. The DIGB correspondence includes two letters from the community in March 1903, applying for support on behalf of teacher Shapira, who was seeking assistance to cover the expenses of educating his two daughters in Berlin. In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner," custom printed for the records of the Jewish Community of Briesen.

 
8 93 Casper Lachmann’sches Waisenhaus, Graudenz, Sitz Danzig
Caspar Lachmann Orphanage, Graudenz, office in Danzig
1903-1921
  

Correspondence with the orphanage (M. Kadisch) and with the Verband der westpreussischen Synagogen-Gemeinden (Gustav Davidsohn), which was apparently responsible for its founding; donor lists, 1903, 1906, 1908; and postal receipts for monies sent. The donor list of 1903 gives each donor's one-time and/or annual donation pledge; the majority of that list is evidently a reproduction, giving donors from elsewhere, while the information for Briesen donors is filled in by hand on the last two pages, signed and dated by community executive chair Callmann; there are 47 names from Briesen, and 233 names in the front part of the list. A copy of a letter to the orphanage, April 20, 1903, and several subsequent items, April-September 1903 (including printed flier of requirements for children applying for admittance), concern the situation of two brothers in Briesen (family name Rosenberg), and the acceptance of one of them at the institute. Some of the correspondence with the Verband pertains to dues and other matters besides the orphanage; an undated copy or draft of a letter (circa 1903) to the Verband (perhaps by Rabbi Eppenstein) highlights the worsening financial situation of smaller communities due to declining population, and asks that discussion of forming a district rabbinate be placed on the agenda of the next meeting. Many letters from the orphanage are reproductions of handwritten text (hectograph or mimeograph). In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner."

 
8 94 Verband der deutschen Juden (No. 127)
Union of German Jews
1904-1920
  

Correspondence with the Verband, and others; a set of clippings concerning the meeting of the Verband in Hamburg in November 1913; postcard receipts for payment of dues; and a manuscript of a speech. The speech pertains to the Verband's 1913 meeting, and is evidently by Sally Bernstein, of Briesen, who was the representative that year for the communities of counties Briesen and Thorn. Correspondents include Rabbi Eppenstein; the Jewish communities of Culm, Culmsee, and Gollub; and Rabbi Walter of Bromberg (September 1917, enclosing a photograph). One letter from the Verband, in August 1919, concerns member communities in areas being ceded to Poland, and encloses a list of those member districts, with number of Jewish community members in each. Printed materials from the Verband include: a flier with its constitution, 1904; a business report for the October 1905 meeting; a statement addressed to the Prussian legislature (Haus der Abgeordneten), 1905, raising concerns about fairness in a draft of a law on the funding of religious instruction in the public elementary schools (Volksschulen); and a list, 1910, of the Verband’s member districts, with number of members in each (enclosure in letter from community of Culmsee, June 1913). Also included is a typed copy of a resolution that was introduced by Rabbi Eppenstein at the October 1909 meeting of the Verband during a discussion of Jews in the Ostmark (that text was published in the journal Ost und West, November 1909, cols. 701-702). In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner," custom printed for the records of the Jewish Community of Briesen.

 
8 95 Verband der westpreussischen Synagogen-Gemeinden
Union of Jewish Communities in the Province of West Prussia
1908 May
  

Two letters from Verband, without evidence of a response. One, addressed to the community executive, concerns completion of a questionnaire (not found), pertaining to the organization's efforts to obtain a state subsidy for Jewish religious instruction for the community. The other, addressed to Rabbi Eppenstein, is an appeal to him to solicit in his circle further personal memberships in the Verband, which would help cover the organization's expenses in efforts to obtain state subsidies for smaller communities. Loose documents (2 items).

 
8 96 Wanderbettelei Reformen (No. 162)
Reforms to address beggary by migrant poor
1909-1916
  

Correspondence (mostly with Jewish organizations); communal announcements, including a circular (listing 72 male and female members) concerning a lecture by Dr. Wolf, of Thorn, April 1910; related to Wolf's lecture, pledge of community members not to give individual alms to migrant poor (approximately 50 signatures); and meeting announcements and printed annual reports (1911, 1913) of the Provinzial-Kasse für jüdische Wanderarmenfürsorge der Provinz Westpreussen (Provincial fund for the aid of Jewish migrant poor in the province of West Prussia), Thorn. Correspondents, besides the Provinzial-Kasse, include: Deutsch-Israelitischer Gemeindebund (DIGB), Berlin; Verband der westpreussischen Synagogen-Gemeinden, Danzig; the employment bureau (Verein für Arbeitsnachweis) of the Berlin B'nai Brith lodge; and the German Eisenbahn (Railroad) office, Graudenz. In late 1910, correspondence includes a handwritten draft of a form (Abfertigungskarte) provided by the Provinzial-Kasse, to be filled out with personal data by individual applicants whom the community was sending to the regional office in Thorn; and the community's inquiry with the railroad concerning arrangements to enable it to more efficiently support the applicants' rail travel to Thorn. Printed materials include minutes of a DIGB conference, December 1909, at which the plan was formulated for the Germany-wide organization, and copy (hectograph?) of handwritten minutes of meeting in Thorn, September 1910, to form the West Prussia provincial branch; DIGB study by Wilhelm Neuman, "Reform der jüdischen Wander-Unterstützungswesens," 1909; stenographic report of the Deutsche Zentralstelle für Jüdische Wanderarmenfürsorge (of the DIGB), meeting September 1910; and a flier of the latter Zentralstelle, circa 1910, giving instruction for border offices. In the original commercial file cover "Stolzenberger Schnell-Hefter."

 
8 97 Matzot distribution tickets 1917
  

Loose document (1 item). Book of tickets for matzot ("Bezugschein auf Mazzos"), issued by the Zentrale für Mazzosversorgung, Frankfurt am Main, with 42 stubs of tickets used, including one with ticket still attached. Most stubs bear names of individual community members, with the number of household members indicated; several are filled out generically for those who were away, and for prisoners (tickets 30129, 30130, 30142).

 
8 98 Wohlfahrtspflege – Sammelakten (No. 225)
Charitable aid – Collection records
1919-1920
  

Appeals for aid from and correspondence with various organizations; letter from Rabbi Neufeld to the community executive, October 1919, with recommendations for charitable contributions; correspondence with the Zentralwohlfahrtsstelle der deutschen Juden, including report of activities, February 1920; copies of cover letters from the community pertaining to the sending of donations; correspondence with the Frauenverein, Briesen, concerning aid to a community member; memo from the Jewish community of Posen concerning appeal for aid for Jewish pogrom victims in the Ukraine, May 1920, and copies of memos from the community executive to various community associations forwarding the same appeal; and one postcard receipt from the Deutsch-Israelitischer Gemeindebund. Other organizations represented include: Verein Esra, Berlin; Deutsch-israelitischer Kinderhort, Limburg an der Lahn; Hilfswerk für Palestine, Berlin; Central-Verein deutscher Staatsbürger jüdischen Glaubens; Verband der Ostjuden in Deutschland; Kriegswaisenfond der Agudas Jisroel, Halberstadt; Caspar Lachmann'sches Provinzial-Waisenhaus; Jüdischer Literatur-Verein, Briesen; Rabbiner-Seminar zu Berlin; and Komitee zur Sanierung der notleidenden israelitischen Wohlfahrtsanstalten Wiens. German title taken from fragmentary flag affixed to inside back cover (the piece bearing the title is detached). In the original commercial file cover "Schnell-Hefter Helios." 39 leaves.

 
8 99 Religion teacher Jacob Stern 1897 January - February
  

Petition of Rabbi Eppenstein to the community executive, with communal decision noted; copies of community executive correspondence with Eppenstein, Stern, and the government; internal correspondence of the Briesen Jewish Community Council; and copy of petition by Stern to the government. Eppenstein's petition asks that teacher Stern no longer be allowed to teach religion and Hebrew, due to his having married his daughter to a person of a different faith; and a letter from the community executive to the government announces a communal decision to dismiss Stern. In his petition Stern protests his dismissal and the discontinuation of his salary. Loose documents (4 items).

 
8 100 Religious school/ Hebrew instruction 1897 February - July
  

Meeting notices (circulars) and minutes pertaining to the Jewish community's school commission; curricula of the school; communal announcement (circular); and correspondence with Hebrew teacher L. Schapira. The school commission was headed by Jewish community executive chair Max Bauer. Includes two sets of minutes of the commission, in February (with undated curricula for I. and II. class) and April; and a curriculum for Hebrew instruction reviewed by the Jewish community executive and circulated to the Jewish community representatives' assembly in March. The announcement concerns Rabbi Eppenstein's continuing to give Hebrew instruction at that time; in the meantime, the commission had decided to place an advertisement for the position of Hebrew teacher. Three items from Schapira, all dated April 30, with identical content but to different addressees, concern his application for the advertised position. Two further letters from Schapira, in May and July, concern the ongoing instruction (class size: 45); his request for an attendance list form and payment of his salary; and, subsequently, his request for a raise. Loose documents (14 items).

 
8 101 Lissewo
Lissewo (branch community)
1903
  

Correspondence with L. Lehmann, of Lissewo, and with the Deutsch-Israelitische Gemeindebund, concerning aid for the support of religious instruction in Lissewo. In the original commercial file cover "Stolzenberger Schnell-Hefter." 6 leaves.

 
8 102 Jüdische Volksschule (No. 146b)
Jewish elementary school
1876, 1906-1907
  

Correspondence with the government, the Central-Verein deutscher Staatsbürger jüdischen Glaubens, and the Verband der deutschen Juden; internal correspondence of the Briesen Jewish Community Council; meeting notice (circular) for extraordinary meeting of representatives; and communal decisions. Concerns negotiation of terms pursuant to a government proposal to close the Jewish elementary school because of the small number of students, and to have the Jewish students attend the local Christian school instead, where a Jewish teacher would be employed to give Jewish religious instruction. Correspondence from the Briesen magistrate includes minutes of a school committee (Schuldeputation) that examined the issues. Also includes one letter from the government dated 1876, which conveys the denial of a request by the community at that time to maintain a separate school fund in the interim until the local nondenominational school (Simultanschule) was established. In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner." 36 leaves.

 
8 103 Acta des Jüdischen Lesevereins zu Briesen Wpr.
Records of the Jewish Reading Society of Briesen
1901-1908
  

Announcement circulars, including agendas of meetings and lectures; list of library holdings; programs of Chanukkah and Purim celebrations; correspondence; and a list of members, with a record of receipt of circulars 1906-1907. Correspondence includes a letter from the Briesen municipal government, December 1905, granting permission for a holiday event, and one postcard addressed to Rabbi Eppenstein from one of the speakers, Marta Bukofzer, of Königsberg. The circulars initially list approximately 30 members, and later over 50. The announcements are typically signed by the secretary, Adolf Jäger, and sometimes co-signed by Rabbi Eppenstein, as chair. The earliest dated item, October 1901, announces a meeting for the founding of the society, at which a draft constitution was to be presented, and election of leadership held; it is signed by Rabbi Eppenstein, Jäger, teacher Schapira, Mendelssohn, and Wolff. The announcement of the first lecture evening, December 1901, indicates that the event is open also to women, and to children 14 or older (later announcements refer to families of members being invited, and sometimes also to guests being welcome); that of March 9, 1902, includes a note about the opening of the society's library, and is accompanied by a list of 40 works that were available from the librarian, Dr. Wolff. Earlier meetings were held at Harris's hall; after fall 1902 the venue is typically Hotel Schwarzer Adler. In the original file cover; a note on the front suggests that these records were kept by Jäger, the society's secretary (Schriftführers).

 
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Series IV: Religious institutions, 1880-1921

In German.
32 folders
Arrangement:

Arranged in the following subseries:

Scope and Content:

This series contains correspondence and administrative records related to communal religious institutions, including the synagogue (Subseries 1), the cemetery (Subseries 2); the mikveh, or ritual bath house (Subseries 3); and kosher meat tax (Krupka) administration, the slaughterhouse facilities, and the hiring of a Jewish butcher (Subseries 4). Further details are conveyed in the scope notes for each subseries.

Subseries 1: Synagogue, 1880-1919

12 folders
Arrangement:

One file concerning synagogue rules is followed by groupings concerning synagogue seat rentals and construction projects. Arrangement within the latter groupings is roughly chronological.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains records related to the synagogue of the Briesen community, which was dedicated in 1850. The first file contains a few documents related to the community's rules for the synagogue (Folder 104), which were first issued in 1872; included is a printed flier of rules (Tempel-Ordnung) for posting to the community, especially relating to order and decorum during services. The remaining files in the subseries fall into two groupings: records documenting synagogue seat rentals in the periods 1880-1890, and 1904-1919 (Folders 105-111), including lists of individual seat owners; and records concerning renovation and construction pertaining to the synagogue. Several of the latter files (Folders 112-114) concern a major renovation of the building in 1905 that included installation of decorative windows bearing inscriptions from donors; included is a letter of appreciation sent to donors, enclosing the text of a newspaper article about the renovation and the dedication ceremony. The last file in the subseries concerns the construction of an emergency staircase in the synagogue in 1910 (Folder 115).

BoxFolderTitleDate
8 104 Synagogue rules undated, 1883, 1910
  

Handwritten announcements, 1883, 1910; printed synagogue rules for posting to the community, undated (circa 1910?); and copy of one outgoing letter, 1883. The 1883 announcement, referring to community synagogue rules dated September 1872, specifies that the synagogue attendant is the person designated by the community executive to monitor adherence to the rules, and recapitulates certain rules related to order and decorum during synagogue services; the handwritten announcement of 1910 reminds community members to follow the rules, in particular the prohibition against bringing children under six years old into the synagogue. The letter, signed by community chair Leopold Littmann, is an admonishment to the addressee, Elias Schoenbarth, to desist from holding private services in his home. Loose documents (4 items).

 
8 105 Synagogue seat rentals 1880-1890
  

Annual lists of synagogue seat owners, 1880/1881 to 1890/1891; communal announcements and meeting minutes concerning sale of seats; meeting notices and other circulars; one petition from several seat owners, 1885, concerning spacing of seats, with communal decision; and one note from the community executive to the treasurer, 1885, concerning a payment. The lists indicate the total amount received by the communal treasury, with signature of the treasurer and community executive. One circular, 1886, from the community executive, is a proposal to lower the prices of some seats in order to reduce the surplus of unsold seats. Volume lacks a cover or title page, and the first document (list of seat owners 1880/1881) is fragmentary. Bound volume.

 
BoxFolderTitleDate
9 106 Verpachtung der Sitze
Synagogue seat rentals
1904-1910
  

Lists of seat owners, 1905/1906 to 1909/1910, in a continuous ledger, with totals each year for amount received by the communal treasury, signed by treasurer Kannowski. At back is a copy of a communal announcement, 1910, and several pages of lists and sums pertaining to various years. A receipt for a payment through the mail, 1907, is affixed on one page. Also includes community executive proposal of steps to encourage the sale of women's seats, 1904. Bound volume. 23 leaves.

 
9 107 Synagogue seat rentals 1911/1912 1911-1912
  

List of seat owners for 1911-1912. Also includes a receipt and a communal announcement, August 1912, concerning the sale of seats for 1912/1913. Bound volume. 7 leaves.

 
9 108 1914/1915
Synagogue seat rentals 1914/1915
circa 1914
  

List of seat owners, and a plan of the men's and women's seats, including names of members assigned to seats. Bound volume. 9 leaves.

 
9 109 1915/1916
Synagogue seat rentals 1915/1916
1915
  

List of seat owners, and a plan of the men's and women's seats, including names of members assigned to seats. Bound volume. 9 leaves.

 
9 110 Sitz-Verpachtung 1917/18
Synagogue seat rentals 1917/18
1917-1918
  

List of seat owners. Also, a plan of the men's and women's seats, including names of members assigned to seats, and a page of notes. With the total amount received by the communal treasury, signed by the treasurer. The list includes two notations for year 1918/1919. Bound volume. 8 leaves.

 
9 111 Synagogue seat rentals – Miscellaneous undated, 1910, 1919
  

Receipt, correspondence, communal minutes/decisions, and an undated plan of the women's seats. In 1910: receipt for payment, correspondence concerning the transfer of one woman's seat, and a petition by a female member for reduction in price. In 1919: correspondence/decision concerning the sale of a men's seat. Loose documents (5 items).

 
9 112 Synagogenfenster (No. 150)
Synagogue windows
1905-1906
  

Correspondence with various glass works, and the Deutsche Glaser-Zeitung, Berlin; receipt for placement of a newspaper advertisement; sketches; cost estimates; communal minutes/decisions concerning hiring of Carl Müller, Berlin, June 1905; and list of donors and corresponding inscriptions for windows, June 1905. Besides Müller, the following firms are represented: Max Marcus, Berlin; Wilhem Haas, Berlin; Balduin Schulze, Stettin; Karfunkel & Wolf; Gerstner & Werner, Görlitz; E. Hoffmann, Marienwerder; Richard Scheibe, Delitzsch; Gustav Rüssmann, Iserlohn; K. Guckeisen, Halle an der Saale; Wilhelm Franke, Naumburg/Saale; Otto Sablewski, Danzig; and Joseph Noafeldt, Neumark. In the original commercial file cover "Stolzenberger Schnell-Hefter."

 
9 113 Quittung – Bau
Receipts – Building fund
1905
  

Copies of receipts from the community for large contributions to the building fund for the synagogue renovation, including a promissory note; and receipts for community bank account balances, Stadt-Spar-Kasse. 3 leaves, with several smaller receipts affixed. German title taken from flag affixed to inside front cover. In the original commercial file cover "Stolzenberger Schnell-Hefter."

 
9 114 Synagogue renovation – Letter to donors 1905 October 15
  

Loose document (1 item). Form letter of thanks for contributions to support renovation of the synagogue, with text of an article about the dedication ceremony. The letter is signed from community executive chair Callmann and the building commission. The article gives details about the renovations carried out and names donors who supported specific aspects.

 
9 115 Bau der Nottreppe an Synagoge (No. 171)
Construction of an emergency staircase in the synagogue
1910
  

Cost estimate for the construction (from the builder J. Littmanns Sohn); communal minutes/decisions; building permit issued by the municipal government, and letter from the government certifying satisfactory completion of the work; communal meeting notices (circulars); correspondence with the builder; and one letter to a tinsmith inviting a bid. In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner," custom printed for the records of the Jewish Community of Briesen. 17 leaves.

 

Subseries 2: Cemetery, 1887-1921

8 folders
Arrangement:

In three groupings concerning burials, ownership and care of graves, and property- and construction-related matters, with each grouping in a roughly chronological order.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains records related to burials in the period 1887 to 1893 (Folders 116-117), and the ownership and care of graves in the cemetery, in 1905 and 1916-1921 (Folders 118-120). Also included are files concerning property- and construction-related matters pertaining to the cemetery, 1899-1903, 1910-1911 (Folders 121-123), especially the building of a new fence upon expansion of the cemetery in 1900. See also, in Folders 132 (Subseries IV.3 Mikveh), items dated 1912 related to the cemetery's becoming connected to the municipal water system.

BoxFolderTitleDate
9 116 Beerdigungen
Burials
1887-1889, 1892
  

Correspondence with the municipal government; communal minutes/decisions; death certificates; invoices/receipts for burial costs paid by the community; receipts for money deposited into the communal treasury (from the family, a death benefit, or collection at the funeral); statements for funeral expenses/income by community treasurer or executive; attestations by physician; and one petition from the community cemetery attendant Isidor Salomon, 1888. Following are the names of the deceased represented (in Briesen, unless otherwise noted). In 1887: Sally Goetz, Lewin Cohn, Rahel Jacobsohn, Julie Joseph, Eva Lipke, Joseph Mendelsohn, Simon Thal, Clara Shmul, and Joseph Hirsch Moses. In 1888: Hermann Oschitzki; Friederike Lewin; Louis Hochstein; infant son of David Oschitzki (Lissewo); Sally Becker; Lewin Goetz; Gabriel Moses; Zalka Moses; Julius Schmul; Abraham Cohn; Elisabeth Benjamin (Lissewo); Liebe Schapira; Max Cohn; Jacob Arondt; infant daughter of Herrmann Harris; and infant daughter of Max[?] Abraham. In 1889: Jonas Benjamin (Lissewo), Rahel/Rachel Salomon, Itzig Littmann, Friederike Goldstein, Julius Jacobi/Jacoby, Margarethe Chaim (Dembowalanka), Betty Moses, Anna Salomon, and Wolff Peter. In 1892: Samuel Goldstein, Hirsch Benjamin, Jeannette Lindenheim (née Littmann), and Leo Goetz. The earlier sets of documents (through J. Benjamin, 1889) are numbered 1 to 26. Bound volume, with detached front cover.

 
9 117 Burials 1890-1893
  

Death certificates; correspondence with the municipal government, and others; and attestations by physician. Other correspondents include Pauline Hochstein, asking for permission to have a tree removed from the grave of her husband, and the executive body of the Jewish burial society, conveying to the community executive a decision concerning the society's not performing its usual functions in certain cases. Following are the names of the deceased represented (in Briesen, unless otherwise noted). In 1890: Johanna Thal (Lobdowo, registered at Lindhof), Simon Joseph, Minna Moses, Henriette Ascher, Amalie Galitzenstein, and Jonas Joachim Benjamin (Lissewo). In 1891: Joseph Harris, Jenny Schmul, Sophie Lewin, Friederike Thal (Lobdowo, registered at Lindhof), and Pauline Samter (née Schachmann). In 1892: Renate Benjamin (Lissewo); an infant son of teacher Eduard Glass (Lissewo); Simon L. Levy; Henriette Meyer (née Gortatowski); Abel Callmann; pensioner Goldstein; Rebecca Cohn (née Leyser); Louis Salomon; and Joseph Ascher. In 1893: Max Goetz, Luise Ascher, and Marie Salomon (née Levy; Gross Leistenau, registered at Schloss Leistenau). Bound volume. 44 leaves.

 
9 118 Cemetery administration – Miscellaneous 1905 October 31
  

Loose document (1 item). Memo (probably from the community executive chair) addressed to community executive member D. Pollitzer with a listing of fees to be collected from three community members, for headstones and fencing, according to the community bylaws; includes a draft of a letter to be sent to grave owner Schulen, in Chemnitz.

 
9 119 Friedhofsverwaltung: schwebende Angelegenheiten
Cemetery administration – Pending matters
1916-1921
  

A series of dossiers on individual grave owners (all residing outside of Briesen), containing correspondence, invoices, and receipts for payments; and a few items of correspondence with Jewish community assistant Guth, 1917, concerning the care of certain graves. The dossiers are in uniform paper folders, each with a form on the front for name, address, and file number. The file numbers range from 1 to 43, with 9, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16, 24, 28, 41, and 42 skipped; one dossier is unnumbered, and several loose items, without folders, pertain to two further individuals. Almost all of the dossiers contain a printed notice from the community, March 1917, concerning an addendum to the community bylaws, with a detachable response form, and a flier with the text of the addendum, dated 1916; the addendum concerns fees for the care of graves. Other materials in some of the dossiers are dated 1916-1921. Following are the grave owners represented, in file number order: Pauline Ascher, Heinrich Ascher, Bernhard Baumann, pensioner Bernhard, Auguste Alexander, Hermann Braun, F. J. Benjamin, Caecilie Cohn, Rosalie Friedländer, widow S. Hirschberg, David Jakobsohn, Jenny Littmann, Alfred Littmann, Martha Marcus, Isidor Mendelsohn, Malwine Sass, Bruno Salomon, Meyer Schwarz, S. Schulen, Anna Wessolowski, Lina Salomon, Isidor Tuchler, Hugo Ascher, Louis Salomon, Isidor Moses, Moritz Schmoll, Moritz Marcus, Artur A. Wolfson, Josef Crohn, S. Auerbach, Max Ascher, Sally Goetz, Henriette Lewy, Georg Lachmann, Louis Joseph, and F. Sally. In the original file cover.

 
9 120 List of graves circa 1917
  

Loose document (5 leaves). Informal notes, or rough draft. Includes names with a grave number and location, and notes about the contact person, or other details concerning the care of the grave. One notation is dated 1917.

 
9 121 Friedhofsmauer/ Zaun
Cemetery wall/ fence (1 of 2)
1899-1900
  

Report of the Jewish community council's cemetery commission to the Jewish community representatives' assembly, 1899; communal minutes/decisions; correspondence with communal societies and with the government; meeting notices (circulars); formal plans/drawings by W. Franck, January 1900, and various other pencil sketches; cost estimates; legal opinion by attorney Stein, Thorn, March 1900; attorney's invoice; and letter from Dr. Hoffmann, Briesen county physician, enclosing invoice for an expert opinion he provided, May 1900 (actual opinion not included). Correspondence includes several petitions of the Jewish community to the Briesen police administration for approval of expansion of cemetery, early 1900, and provincial government permit for the project, issued by the Marienwerder district office, May 1900. German title taken from fragment of a flag found with the documents (once affixed to the cover of the volume). 47 leaves.

 
9 122 Bau der Friedhofsmauer II
Construction of the cemetery wall (2 of 2)
1900-1903
  

Meeting notices (circulars) of the Jewish community council's cemetery building commission; booklet of minutes (p. 1-15, 26-27) and accounts (p. 16-23) of the commission, June 1900 to May 1903; correspondence with the government and others; contract with builder Wilhelm Franck, August 1900; invoices; receipts; sketches; minutes of the Briesen magistrate's office, of a hearing in a border dispute, the Jewish community v. Sankowski, and attorney's invoice in the case, April 1901; reminder notice from the Briesen municipal government concerning amount due for accident insurance for workers, May 1901; agreement with gardener Domanski, October 1901; bid on sale of a piece of unoccupied land of the Jewish community cemetery, December 1901; registered letter to carpenter G. Günther, October 1901; and order to appear at the Briesen mayor's office for meeting about repair of path, November 1901. In the original commercial file cover "Stolzenberger Schnell-Hefter," with fragmentary front cover.

 
BoxFolderTitleDate
10 123 Friedhofsfenster – Zimmermeister Günther (No. 169)
Cemetery window – Carpenter Günther
1910-1911
  

Correspondence of the Jewish community executive with Günther, including minutes of one in-person meeting with him, concerning the community's request that he seal up a certain window and other openings in a firewall on his property, which was adjacent to the community's cemetery; the openings were in violation of municipal regulations. In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner," custom printed for the records of the Jewish Community of Briesen. 7 leaves.

 

Subseries 3: Mikveh, 1881-1913

9 folders
Arrangement:

Arranged in roughly chronological order.

Scope and Content:

The files in this subseries include records concerning the construction of the mikveh, or ritual bath house, in 1882-1883 (Folder 124), and the subsequent upkeep and administration of the facilities, 1884-1913 (Folders 125-132). Included are materials concerning the purchase of land and obtaining of a loan to finance the construction (Folder 124); court cases related to problems with drainage (Folder 125) and to a dispute with a contractor (Folder 129); a renovation in 1895, with architectural plans and technical drawings (Folder 127); and mikveh attendants, either as leaseholders, or employees (Folders 126-127). See also, in Series V, materials concerning assistant cantor Simon Glassmann, who was hired as a mikveh assistant (Badewärter) in the mid 1880s (Folders 146, 148-149).

BoxFolderTitleDate
10 124 Construction of a mikveh 1881-1883
  

Correspondence with the government and others; amortization plan for 12,000 Mark loan; communal minutes/decisions; meeting notices (circulars); minutes/decisions of the Jewish community council's building commission; newspaper advertisements for builders; auction announcement, March 1883; contract with builder Chr. Sand, Thorn, April 1883; invoices; and receipts. Topics include the receipt of the loan of 12,000 Mark from the Provinzial-Hilfskasse (Provincial Relief Fund) of West Prussia, October 1882 (see Folder 127 for the debt instrument related to the loan, dated July 1882) and the purchase of land for the mikveh from Max Abraham, January 1883. The building commission was elected to oversee the project in January 1883; the members were Moritz Lewin, Louis Lewin, Hochstein, and Fabian Kiewe, together with community chair, Leopold Littmann, and sometimes also Albert Cohn. Includes a receipt from builder G. Krafft, 1883, for expenses incurred in submitting drawings and a cost estimate, together with a copied excerpt of Jewish community council minutes from 1881, concerning the council's commissioning of Krafft's submission. Newspaper pages containing ads are from the Ostdeutsche Presse (Bromberg), March 7, 1883, and Der gesellige Zeitung (Graudenz), March 15, 1883. Bound volume.

 
10 125 Abfluss des Badewassers/ Prozess Becker contra Synagogengemeinde
Drainage of bathwater – Court case of Becker v. the Jewish community
1884-1885, 1889, 1891-1893
  

Correspondence with attorneys Gimkiewicz, Warda, and Ruhnau (all in Thorn), the government, and contractors/businesses; court documents; communal minutes/decisions; meeting notices (circulars); cost estimates; architectural plans/diagrams; invoices; and receipts. Besides the first case brought against the Jewish community in 1884-1885, by the widow Becker, there are materials related to two later cases: in 1892-1893, Wilhelm Günther (or his heirs), the new owner of the Becker property; and in 1889, 1892-1893, Mrs. Sass (earlier name: Lukowski). Cost estimates concern the construction of a water drainage system for the mikveh. Includes an architectural plan with diagram that folds out (measuring 16-3/4 x 21-1/2 inches). Title taken from fragmentary flag affixed to inside back cover (the piece bearing the title is detached); front of volume is labeled only informally with the word "Vorfluth" (drainage). Bound volume.

 
10 126 Leasing of the mikveh 1885-1886, 1889, 1892-1893
  

Communal minutes/decisions and meeting notices (circulars); Jewish community announcements of auction of lease; conditions of lease, 1886; contracts; inventory of mikveh, 1886; correspondence from individuals offering bids and subsequently with leaseholders. Includes contract for three-year terms with Simon Simon, 1886, and Simon Cohn, 1889. One item records the appearance of Cohn before the Jewish community executive and his promise to pay an amount owed, January 1893. The items are not bound in any particular chronological order. Some documents dated 1892-1893 are at front, followed by the contract of 1889, then items 1885-1886, 1889 at back. Bound volume.

 
10 127 Badehaus (No. 132)
Mikveh
1882, 1895-1896, 1907, 1911
  

Contract for the Jewish community's sale of boiler/heating equipment, 1911; correspondence with the government, and others; communal minutes/decisions; meeting notices (circulars); architectural plans (f. 13, which folds out; 83v; 99; 145) and technical drawings (blue prints, f. 36-38); cost estimates (f. 113-135); invoices; and receipts. Topics include the repayment of a loan of 12,000 Marks from the West Prussia Provincial Relief Fund (f. 1-2), with a letter from the government, 1896, enclosing the original debt instrument, dated 1882 (f. 175-177); assumption of a new loan of 14,000 Marks from the Schlesische Boden-Credit-Actien-Gesellschaft (Silesian land credit joint-stock company), 1895 (f. 45, 69-70) and 1907 (precedes f. 168); communal decision to undertake a renovation/expansion of the mikveh, 1895 (f. 53); permit for the installation of the heating equipment (f. 85-86); and the hiring of Carl Jahnke as superintendent of the mikveh (f. 93). Correspondents include P. Holz, with a complaint about disrepair of the mikveh (f. 15); Max Cochius, Königsberg (f. 17, 46), acting as the Jewish community's agent in the matter of the new loan; and craftsmen and foundry/engineering firms, most frequently E. Drewitz, Thorn, who provides the boiler. Includes several telegrams, and printed material regarding loans from the West Prussia Provincial Relief Fund (f. 3-4) and the Preussische Central-Bodenkredit-Aktiengesellschaft (Prussian central land credit joint-stock company; f. 5-7). Some meeting notices pertain to the Jewish community council's mikveh building commission. Most of the leaves are numbered, in red pencil, 1 to 177; there are unnumbered leaves bound in at front, dated 1911, and at back, dated 1907. Bound volume.

 
10 128 Mikveh – Various 1884, 1889-1897
  

Cost estimate with drawing/plan, 1884; report of the Jewish community council's commission for repair of the mikve, 1889; communal minutes/decisions, 1889, 1893; invoice for repairs, 1891; and correspondence, 1897. The cost estimate is for landscaping around the mikveh. The communal decision of 1889 regards the leasing of the mikveh to Simon Cohn for the three-year period October 1889 to October 1892. The decision of 1893 apparently concerns the waiving of an amount owed by Cohn to the community following the end of his lease. (For other materials related to Cohn, including his contract for 1889-1892, see the bound volume in Folder 126.) The correspondence consists of one letter from mikveh superintendent Carl Janke/Jahnke, mainly concerning salary; the other is from E. Drewitz, Thorn, a boiler maker/machinery firm, concerning a repair and a payment. Other correspondence from both Jahnke and Drewitz is found in the bound volume in Folder 127; and documents pertaining to a court case with Drewitz are found in Folder 129. A statement for mikveh expenses in 1885 is found in Folder 149. Loose documents (7 items).

 
10 129 Repräsentanten-Vorlagen
Represenatives' documents
1896-1897
  

Official court documents in case of E. Drewitz v. the Jewish Community of Briesen; and correspondence with Drewitz, pertaining to a dispute over payment. Also included is a draft of the communal budget of the Jewish community of Briesen for 1896/1897. Drewitz was a maker of steam engines and boilers, located in Thorn, and completed work related to the mikveh/bath house. In the original file cover custom printed for the records of the Jewish Community of Briesen. 18 leaves.

 
10 130 Mikveh – Various 1900
  

Draft instructions for the mikveh attendant, along with draft contract for the hiring of Jahnke as the attendant for term April 1900 to April 1901. Loose documents (2 items).

 
10 131 Badehaus-Verwaltung (No. 132c)
Mikveh administration
1900-1903
  

Communal minutes/decisions; correspondence with the government and others; reports on the mikveh by the community executive to the representatives' assembly, including annual budgets of income and expenses; invoices; cost estimates; two newspaper clippings; and a pencil sketch. Among the correspondents are several companies providing repairs or supplies. Includes a chart from May/June 1900 apparently recording usage statistics; a packet of materials separately bound together pertaining to repair of the well in the mikveh, 1901-1902, with minutes of the Jewish community council's mikveh commission; two items in 1903 from the Westpreussischer Verein zur Ueberwachung von Dampfkesseln (West Prussian association for the monitoring of boilers), Danzig; and correspondence in 1902-1903 concerning a new ordinance requiring residential houses, including the mikveh, to be connected to the municipal water system. The clippings are pages from a Briesen county newspaper (Briesener Kreisblatt) containing government announcements and police ordinances. In the original commercial file cover "Stolzenberg Schnell-Hefter."

 
10 132 Kanalisation des Badehauses und des Friedhofs (No. 184)
Provisions for sewer drainage of the mikveh and the cemetery
1912-1913
  

Cost estimates; architectural plans/technical drawings; correspondence with the government, with contractors (plumbing, boring, builders); internal correspondence of the Briesen Jewish Community Council; building permit; contract with plumber Joseph Jakobsohn; inspection certificate (Abnahme-Schein), 1913; communal minutes reporting on the community executive's inspection of the completed work, October 1913, and communal meeting notices (circulars). The plans give the address of the property where the mikveh is located as Schulstrasse 30. Only two items, both dated May 1912, pertain to the cemetery: a memo from the community executive to the chair of the representatives' assembly, Max Michalowitz, asking him to convene the community council's cemetery commission; and a petition to the Briesen magistrate conveying a community decision to have the cemetery connected to the municipal water system (both copies without indication of reply or follow-up). In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner," custom printed for the records of the Jewish Community of Briesen.

 

Subseries 4: Kosher meat tax administration, slaughterhouse, and Jewish butcher, 1880-1891, 1905

3 folders
Arrangement:

Arranged in roughly chronological order.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains materials related to the administration of the kosher meat tax (Krupka) in the period 1880 to 1891 (Folder 133), with inclusion of a few items pertaining to the position of assistant cantor and shochet (ritual slaughterer); the construction of a slaughterhouse facility in 1885 (Folder 134); and the hiring of a Jewish butcher in 1905 (Folder 135). See Series V for the bulk of the materials related to the hiring and tenure of assistant cantors.

BoxFolderTitleDate
10 133 Kosher meat tax administration; assistant cantor and shochet position 1880-1891
  

Jewish community announcements of auctions for leasing of kosher meat tax collection; communal minutes/decisions and meeting notices (circulars); contracts with leaseholders of kosher meat tax collection; agreement with Cantor Blaustein concerning shochet duties, 1880; rules for the leasing of kosher meat tax collection, 1882, 1883; bids, 1883; and resignation letter of Cantor J. Schoen, July 1883. Meeting notice and minutes for meeting of July 1883 mainly concern the filling of the cantor position after Schoen's resignation, with draft advertisement for the position. Leaseholders represented with contracts: Herrmann Wessolowski, 1880; Meyer Moses, 1881; and Meyer Cohn, 1882. Bound volume. 46 leaves.

 
BoxFolderTitleDate
11 134 Slaughterhouse 1885
  

Minutes/decisions and internal correspondence of the Briesen Jewish Community Council; letter/invoice from Joseph Chaim, Dembowalonka, concerning amount owed by the Jewish Community of Briesen for rent of slaughterhouse for the year 1884/1885; correspondence with the Briesen magistrate and the provincial government office in Kulm concerning permission to build a slaughter stall; building permits issued by the Briesen police administration and the provincial office in Kulm; contract with builder Wilhelm Franck; and cost estimate for building the new slaughter stall. Bound volume. 12 leaves.

 
11 135 Fleischer
Jewish butcher
1905
  

Newspaper clipping from the Israelitisches Familienblatt, Frankfurt am Main (July 20; 2 leaves), containing the Briesen Jewish Community's advertisement for a Jewish butcher, and completed order form for the same announcement; letters of application, and further correspondence to community executive member Michalowitz from applicants. Some of the letters have notations indicating that a response was sent, and the amount of postage, although there are no copies of the outgoing letters. The applicants: Joseph Sommer, Rotenburg; B. Baruch, Göttingen; M. Trykl, Wronke (2 items); Felix Werner, Berent; Adolf Zilversmit, Hardenberg, Netherlands (Dutch letterhead; 3 items); E. Guth, Lessen; and Paul Levin[?], Rogasen. In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner." 15 leaves.

 
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Series V: Employment of rabbis and other community personnel, circa 1873-1919

Predominantly in German, with some Hebrew and occasional occurrence of Yiddish.
26 folders
Arrangement:

Records pertaining specifically to the post of community rabbi are followed by more general personnel files pertaining to the position of cantor and shochet, and other positions. Within these two groupings files are arranged roughly chronologically.

Scope and Content:

The records in this series pertain to the community's hiring of rabbis, cantors, and other personnel, as well as administrative matters during the employees' terms of office, including such topics as contracts, salary negotiations, duties, time off, and complaints or special requests from the employees, or complaints from community members related to employees. Files that cover the hiring process for a given position include application letters and supporting materials, such as recommendation letters and educational certifications; supporting materials are included not only for candidates who were hired but also for some of those who were not hired.

Approximately the first third of the materials (Folders 136-145) concern the community rabbi position, while the remaining files (Folders 146-161) pertain to various positions, mostly those of cantor (hazan) and assistant cantor, positions that also included duties as shochet, or ritual slaughterer; one file pertains to a short-term position as cantor (Vorbeter) for the High Holidays (Folder 158).

Of the community's rabbis, Rabbi Simon Eppenstein is best represented, with materials pertaining to the entire course of his long tenure with the community (Folders 137-141), from his hiring, in July 1889, until his departure at the end of 1911, as well as some subsequent correspondence. One file of materials concerns Rabbi Rubin Halpersohn (served April 1912 to March 1914; Folder 142). In addition, some items concerning Rabbi Leopold Treitel (served 1881 to 1884) are found in Folder 146; a few concerning Rabbi Siegbert Neufeld (served 1915-1920) are found in Folders 142 and 160; and there is one item related to Rabbi Israel Goldschmidt (served circa 1878-1880; Folder 136). One file concerns a dispute with a community member over a wedding fee, in view of the vacancy of the community rabbi post in 1914, following the departure of Rabbi Halpersohn (Folder 144).

Of the cantors employed by the community, the best represented are Salmon Blaustein, who served the community from 1874 until 1894 (Folders 147 and 150; see also an agreement in Series IV, Folder 133); Markus May (served 1910-1912; Folder 156); and Georg Jospe (served 1913-1918; Folder 160). Much of the material related to Jospe pertains to his service in the military during the First World War, and the community's petitions to the government for him to be granted leaves or deferments; the same file also contains references to Rabbi Neufeld's serving as a military chaplain during the same period.

Smaller amounts of material concern other employees, including cantors D. Heymann (served 1896-1897; Folder 152) and Hermann Tykoschinski/Tykocinski (served 1909-1910; Folders 154-155, 159). There are also items concerning assistant cantor Simon Glassmann (served 1883-1885; Folders 146, 148-149), whom the community was forced to dismiss when it came to light that he was not a German subject; and a few items concerning teacher Schapira (Folder 146).

BoxFolderTitleDate
11 136 Rabbi Israel Goldschmidt smicha certificate circa 1873-1878
  

Loose document (1 item). Printed copy of certificate, in Hebrew, with notations referring to the seal of the Rabbiner-Seminar, Berlin, and of signature of Rabbi Hildesheimer, the director. Rabbi Goldschmidt (1849-1924) served in Briesen for a short time, beginning in 1878. The Hildesheimer seminary was dedicated in fall 1873. Fragmentary, with the upper left quarter of the document missing.

 
11 137 Employment of a rabbi 1887-1889
  

Communal minutes/decisions, meeting notices (circulars), newspaper advertisement for the rabbi position, a draft contract for the rabbi position, a signed contract with Rabbi Simon Eppenstein, July 1889, and a letter from the provincial regional government office in Marienwerder, July 1889, inquiring about the citizenship status of Rabbi Eppenstein. The advertisement for the vacant rabbi position appeared in Der Israelit, 2nd supplement to Nr. 18, Jahrg. 29, p. 335, in the last week of February 1888. Bound volume, with detached front cover. 26 leaves.

 
11 138 Election of Rabbi Simon Eppenstein 1889 June
  

Meeting notice (circular) and communal minutes/decision, for the representatives' meeting on June 18, 1888, at which Rabbi Eppenstein, of Krotoschin, was elected, over Rabbi Salomon Goldschmidt, of Wreschen. Loose documents (2 items).

 
11 139 Anstellung des Rabbiners Dr. Eppenstein (No. 121)
Employment of Rabbi Dr. Simon Eppenstein
1888-1889, 1894-1895, 1898-1910
  

Letter of application, 1889; certificate of Prussian citizenship from Krotoschin government office; educational certifications (Gymnasium, Krotoschin; Rabbiner-Seminar, Berlin; and Leipzig University diploma, 1888); contract, 1889; communal announcement of early services, 1900; correspondence with Eppenstein, and others; communal decisions; and correspondence between the representatives' assembly and the community executive, concerning Eppenstein's petition for a raise, 1907. One letter from the community executive, June 1894, concerns the community's decision at that time to dismiss Eppenstein, and is accompanied by proof of delivery by a court officer. The other correspondents are the Rabbiner Verband, 1903, concerning its call for communities to establish a pension fund for rabbis; and the Provinzial-Schul-Kollegium of West Prussia, 1903-1904, concerning arrangements for Rabbi Eppenstein to give religious instruction at the local high school (the Realprogymnasium), and co-funding of his salary by the community. One item in Latin (oversize university diploma, 26 x 18-3/4 inches); and one letter with a Hebrew passage. Bound volume.

 
11 140 Correspondence from Rabbi Simon Eppenstein 1890, 1892, 1894
  

Topics include negotiation of his duties under his contract, vacation time, and financial matters. One letter (April 1894), addressed specifically to J. Alexander, partially concerns a burial society matter. In the last letter (June 1894) Eppenstein indicates that he had received a termination letter from the community, although he considers it to have no validity, in view of a recent communal decision that had already been conveyed to him, confirming that he would continue in office. Loose documents (6 items).

 
11 141 Rabbiner Dr. Eppenstein (No. 121b)
Rabbi Dr. Simon Eppenstein
1909-1913
  

Correspondence with Eppenstein and others; internal correspondence of the Briesen Jewish Community Council; communal decisions; newspaper clippings; and one receipt. Topics include invitations to a farewell reception for Eppenstein in November 1911, before he leaves to assume a teaching post at the Hildesheimer Rabbiner Seminar; those correspondents include the Jewish communities of Gollub, Schönsee, and Bischofswerder, and the director of the local high school (Realprogymnasium). One item is a letter from community member Gustav Götz, 1910, raising a concern about the validity of a certain decision with respect to the community statutes. The correspondence with Rabbi Eppenstein includes a letter of thanks from him and his son Siegfried, for the community's gift on Siegfried's bar mitzvah, 1910. Two items of the correspondence date from after Eppenstein's departure from the community: a copy of a thank-you letter to Rabbi Eppenstein and his wife from the community, 1912, for their gift of a silver yad (pointer used to read from the Torah scroll), and, in 1913, a thank-you letter from Rabbi Eppenstein to the community related to the burial of his mother. One newspaper clipping, affixed to a letter from Eppenstein, December 1911, concerns a memorial service for the first yahrzeit of Hirsch Hildesheimer; the other is a page from the education section of Israelitisches Familienblatt, January 26, 1911. In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner," custom printed for the records of the Jewish Community of Briesen.

 
11 142 Rabbiner Dr. Halpersohn (No. 182)
Rabbi Dr. Rubin Halpersohn
1912-1916, 1919
  

Heidelberg University diploma, with envelope; correspondence with Halpersohn, the government, and others; communal minutes/decisions (or excerpts); program of inauguration; Halpersohn's contract; meeting notices (circulars); a note about salary of the rabbi, as well as Cantor Jospe, circa 1913; and a draft contract for Halpersohn's successor, Rabbi Neufeld, 1916. Rabbi Halpersohn, of Hohensalza, began his term as a religion teacher for the community in April 1912. Accompanying the program of the inauguration is a copy of a welcome speech, apparently by community executive chair Callmann, and a welcome letter from Sally Bernstein, to be read aloud at the event, both dated March 31, 1912. One letter from Halpern, in October 1912, contains proposals regarding education and religious services. Other correspondents include the director of the local high school (Realprogymnasium); the Jewish communities in Bischofswerder, Gollub, and Schönsee; and, in 1919, the Jewish community of Offenburg (who request a recommendation for Halpersohn). One item is a picture postcard of Golub-Dobrzyń, August 1912, related to an excursion there of the Briesen religion class. Topics include such matters as vacations, duties, and salary. Items in March 1914 include a resignation letter from Halpersohn; a farewell text by community executive chair Callmann, commending Halpersohn's accomplishments; and a recommendation for him from the community. In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner," custom printed for the records of the Jewish Community of Briesen. One item in Latin (oversize diploma, 26 x 18-3/4 inches).

 
11 143 Besetzung des Rabbinats (No. 191)
Employment of a rabbi
1914 March
  

Correspondence with the rabbinic seminary (Rabbinerseminar), Berlin (Rabbi Simon Eppenstein), and the Jewish Theological Seminary, Breslau, concerning vacancy for a rabbi and teacher; draft advertisement for the position; letters of application and further correspondence; school certifications, recommendation letters, and curricula vitae; and one postal receipt. Applicants: Treumann, Lautenburg; Levy (Leo) Rosenblatt, Paderborn; Julius Moses, Bütow; Moses Ucko, Hamborn; Martin Lachmann, Beuel (Bonn); Siegfried Steinweg, Hüls (Krefeld); Willy Gabbe, Hüls (Krefeld); Adolf Philippsborn, Münstereifel; Max Rosenberg, Gumbinnen; M. Jaffe, Bromberg; A. Neuwirth, Mainz; and Josef Honig, Grosswardein, Hungary. In the original commercial file cover "Stella," custom printed for the records of the Jewish Community of Briesen. Some recommendation letters in Hebrew.

 
11 144 Josef David Streitsache (No. 194)
Joseph David litigation
1914 April - July
  

Correspondence with the government, including copies of David's initial complaint, concerning a wedding fee, and follow-up response; and invoice from the government for a fee incurred for paperwork. David's complaint concerns the fee that the community charged for his daughter's wedding at a time when the rabbi position was vacant, compelling him, he argued, to hire an outside rabbi, whom he paid out of pocket (he engaged Rabbi Halpersohn, the community's former rabbi, who had recently left for another post). Normally when the rabbinate was vacant, the fee would have been reduced by half; however, since the community had engaged a religion teacher and preacher, D. Weinmann, who could have performed the ceremony, it had charged David the full fee. In the original commercial file cover "Stella," custom printed for the records of the Jewish Community of Briesen. 18 leaves.

 
11 145 Besetzung des Rabbinats (No. 198)
Employment of a rabbi
1915
  

Letter to Israelitisches Familienblatt, and copy of issue July 8, 1915, including advertisement for rabbi at Briesen (p. 6); letters of application, and further correspondence with applicants; recommendation letters, including one by Rabbi Halpersohn, former rabbi of Briesen; and list of applicants. Applicants: Salomon Horowitz, Gütersloh; L. Darmstadter (a German American living in Berlin); A. Neuwirth, Mainz; Joseph Prys, Galanta, Hungary; H. Rosenberg, Zurich; and H. Wiesel, Hohensalza. In the original commercial file cover "Stella," custom printed for the records of the Jewish Community of Briesen. 24 leaves.

 
11 146 Personnel matters – Cantors, rabbi, teacher 1881-1888
  

Correspondence with employees, with applicants, and with the government; communal minutes/decisions, or excerpts; meeting notices (circulars); instructions for cantor, 1880, and for assistant cantor, 1883; and petitions. Correspondents include Cantor Salomon Blaustein, assistant cantor Simon Glassmann, Rabbi Leopold Treitel, and teacher L. Schapira. Volume comprises 3 discernible sections bound together. Section 1 (in plain blue covers) with a fragmentary flag bound in at front, showing the title "Gehaltszulage" (salary increase), 1885-1886, concerns Blaustein's request for a raise upon extension of his contract. Section 2 (with a tan back cover), 1883-1886, concerns employment matters related to Blaustein, Glassmann and Schapira, as well as action on vacant rabbi and second teacher positions in 1884, and assistant cantor position in 1885. Includes a recommendation for Blaustein at his request, and certification of Glassmann's qualifications as shochet, by Rabbi Treitel, both in 1883; and two petitions of representatives, December 1884, protesting the months' long delay in filling the rabbi position. Some items in 1883-1885 concern a government order for Glassmann, as a Russian subject, to be expelled, including a petition by the community on his behalf, and Glassmann's report on his own in-person petition in Danzig. Section 3, dated 1881-1888, concerns Blaustein and Treitel: Excerpts regarding hiring of Blaustein, 1874, and contracts, 1877, 1880. Copy, 1883, of excerpt regarding election of Treitel, 1881, and signed contract, 1881; in 1884, decision not to renew his contract, and to leave rabbi position unfilled as of September 1884, due to community debt. Regarding latter decision, includes letter from Treitel's father-in-law, Rabbi Salomon Brann, Schneidemühl, and community petition in protest (43 signatures). In 1884-1888, materials concerning Blaustein's compensation and renewals of his contract. The last item is a government directive, 1888, highlighting that a rabbinical divorce and permission to remarry is not sufficient without verification that a civil divorce has been carried out. Bound volume, lacking back cover.

 
11 147 Personal-Akten der Beamten
Personnel records of the officers
1883-1885, 1892-1893
  

Communal minutes, including complaints of community members pertaining to community employees, and investigation of complaints; petitions from or correspondence with community employees and community members; meeting notices (circulars); and police warning, 1892, about condition of the courtyard. Mostly relates to cantor and shochet Salomon Blaustein; a few items, 1883, concern assistant cantor Schoen. Complaints pertain to matters such as hours available, or validity of kosher certification; one complaint, 1883, relates to an incident in which Blaustein sought to persuade a certain young man to make a marriage proposal to the niece of a member. Other topics include matters of compensation, rules about taking leave, and extension of contract. German title taken from fragmentary flag bound in at back (the piece bearing the title is detached). Bound volume. 25 leaves.

 
BoxFolderTitleDate
12 148 Employment of an assistant cantor and shochet 1883
  

Letters of application for the position; petition from community members in support of applicant Simon Glassmann (45 signatures); letter from synagogue attendant L. Hirsch (critical of Glassmann); and letters from the Jewish communities of Chemnitz and Wiesbaden, concerning religion teacher Rabbi Leopold Treitel, with Briesen community's letters of recommendation for Treitel in response (noting that they had been unaware he was looking for a new position). Includes two postal receipts and several notations on letters concerning return of personal documents, but no copies of any letters from the community to the applicants. Applicants (in order of first occurrence): M. Kallmann, Schneidemühl; S. M. Grossbard, Thorn; S. Schwarz; Wolf Markels, Breslau; Max Markels, Breslau; Moritz Lippe/Lippschütz, Berlin; Moritz Goldberg, Ostrowo; C. Lublinski, Thorn (with a postscript in Yiddish); Mendel Saron, Schmaeleningken (with copy of recommendation letter, and second enclosure in Hebrew); Simon Glassmann, Briesen; Julius Stich, Obersitzko; R. Friedmann, Rawitsch; and Faust, Dresden. Bound volume. 30 leaves.

 
12 149 Assistant Cantor Samuel Glassmann; mikveh administration 1885
  

Correspondence with the government; financial statement concerning mikveh expenses; and meeting notices (circulars). Includes two items comprising partial correspondence related to the dismissal of Glassmann as a mikveh assistant, due to his not being a German subject: a copy of a petition from the community to the government, in February; and a letter from the government, in June, regarding a fine imposed on the community executive for approving the hiring. The petition explains the background of the hiring and employment of Glassmann since August 1883, and his good character and performance, and asks that he be allowed to continue on a provisional basis. The financial statement, from the end of June, includes a note about a salary payment to be made to Glassmann. In the original file cover custom printed for the records of the Jewish Community of Briesen.

 
12 150 Correspondence with Cantor Salomon Blaustein 1888-1891, 1894
  

Concerns various matters related to compensation and employment. One item, 1888, addressed to Blaustein from community executive Littmann, concerns the extension of Blaustein's contract until 1891. Two letters from Blaustein, in April 1894, convey his protests against his termination by the community. See also two items from March 1894 that make reference to Cantor Blaustein, in Folder 10. Loose documents (6 items).

 
12 151 Inquiries about vacant cantor positions 1894, 1896
  

Three items in May 1894 concern the vacant cantor position following the departure of Cantor Blaustein. One (postmarked 1894?) refers to a cantor position for the High Holidays; and one, in 1896, to an assistant cantor position. The correspondents are M. Löwensohn, Krojanke; B. Rochelsohn, Weissensee/Berlin; A. Salkow, Jarotschin; Finkelstein, Russia (postmarked Graudenz-Marienburg); and L. Platan, Thorn. Loose documents (5 items).

 
12 152 Correspondence with Cantor D. Heymann 1896-1897
  

Two items in 1896 are appeals from Heymann for reimbursement for moving and travel costs related to his move from Rogowo to Briesen; the earlier item has a communal decision noted. In the last item, in 1897, Heymann refers again to the latter matter, and also requests a contract, after having served in the community for ten months. Loose documents (3 items).

 
12 153 Kantor – Provisorische Besetzung
Cantor – Temporary filling of the post
1904
  

Letters of application, recommendation letters, and one letter from Rabbi Eppenstein reporting on a test he administered to candidate Bornstein. The applicants: Leopold Bornstein, Kobylin; A. Lenitzky, Berlin; Simon Glück, Cöthen; L. Wittenberg, Wreschen; M. Fuchs, Gollub; E. Salomon, Langallen; Mordecai Yitzhok Isaac Rabinovitch (letter in Hebrew, possibly a recommendation); Rück, Bajohren (Memel county); A. Stutcka; S. Isaksohn, Königsberg; and Marcus, Berlin. In the original commercial file cover "Stolzenberger Schnell-Hefter." 34 leaves. Some recommendation letters in Hebrew and one recommendation (postcard) in Yiddish.

 
12 154 Besetzung des Kantorats (No. 124)
Employment of a cantor
1909-1910
  

Clippings of newspaper advertisement for the position of cantor and shochet; letters of application and further correspondence; letters from Rabbi Eppenstein reporting on tests he administered to shochet candidates; and communal minutes recording agreement with Cantor Tykoschinski (Tykocinski), of Leibitsch, as assistant cantor for the High Holidays, 1910. The other applicants are: B. Holzmann, Lipno; Piechotka, Preussisch Friedland; D. Fleischmann, Berlin; Rafael Goetz, Berlin; H. M. Drewienka, Thorn; J. Rawitscher, Löbau; Heinrich Saler, Saar-Union; Abraham L. Lewy, Rossdorf; Willy Jastrow, Dirschau; H. Wolfram, Labes; Abraham Lewithan, Tuchel; Julius Wartelski, Miloslaw; M. Ucko, Riesenburg; Leopold Loewenthal, Schwersenz; S. Schul, Znin; Samuel Lasowski, Neustadt; Salo Cohn, Potsdam; Arnold B.[?], Bromberg. A letter to the government, March 1910, discussing the consideration of several of these candidates is found in Folder 156. Some recommendation letters in Hebrew. Title on flag affixed to inside front cover: Meldungen – Schächter & Cantoren (Applications/communications – Shochets and cantors). In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner."

 
12 155 Correspondence concerning Cantor Tykoschinski 1910
  

One item is a draft letter to the Jewish community of Freystadt marked as 'not sent'; it concerns the Briesen community's allowing Cantor Tykoschinski to serve in Freystadt for the High Holidays. The other item (2 leaves) consists of typed copies of two letters sent to Josef Reich, Leibitsch, conveying a recommendation for Tykoschinski, with mention that he served in Briesen from November 1909 to September 1910. Loose documents (2 items).

 
12 156 Kantor May (No. 161)
Cantor Markus May
1910-1912, 1914
  

Application from May, with recommendation letters; circulars concerning May's test presentation and inauguration (January/September 1910); correspondence with May, the government, and others; letter from Rabbi Eppenstein reporting the results of test he administered to May; newspaper clipping (affixed to letter of Cantor May) and flier pertaining to cantorial course offered by the Deutsch-Israelitischer Gemeindebund, April 1910; May's contract; communal minutes/decisions; invoices; and receipts. One item is a telegram. Correspondence includes a letter from the community to the government, March 1910, detailing the process of evaluating candidates that led to May's election; letters to booksellers about music books; and a letter from S. Bernstein to the community executive requesting an investigation of May's behavior in a disagreement over his duties, May 1911. Includes communal minutes/decisions on the following topics: In 1910, May's inauguration, and the income received from the auction of the honor of aliyah ("Elie"; being called up to the Torah to make a blessing before the next chapter of the Torah is read publicly), on Simchat Torah. In 1911, a hearing pertaining to a disagreement between May and synagogue attendant Guth and his wife, stemming from a physical fight between their young sons; May's assuming duties of bar mitzvah preparation and Hebrew instruction; and the writing of a letter to May admonishing him against collecting slaughtering fees in instances not authorized by the community. In 1912: the content of and fees for bar mitzvah instruction. Only two items date from later than 1912: a sympathy letter from the community to May, in Lautenburg, upon the death of his wife; and May's thank-you letter in response. In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner."

 
12 157 Correspondence with applicant Cantor M. Kornblum 1910-1911
  

One item, 1910, declines Kornblum's application for a cantor position that had been taken at that time by Cantor Tykoschinski. The other three items, all dated in June 1911, concern his renewed application for a position; two are about arrangements for his sample presentation in Briesen as part of the application process, and the last is a follow-up letter giving biographical details and enclosing a copy of a recommendation letter. Kornblum writes from Biala, near Bielitz, Silesia. Loose documents (4 items).

 
12 158 Vorbeter für die hohen Festtage (No. 168)
Cantor for the High Holidays
1909, 1911
  

Letters of inquiry; recommendation letters; and correspondence with applicants. The majority of applicants are represented only with a letter of inquiry; recommendations are present for Falk, Kornblum, and Schlesinger (the latter in Hebrew, with a note in German from Rabbi Eppenstein on verso). The applicants: M. Bergmann, Königsberg; Max Dobriner, Märkisch Friedland; Samuel Schmulewitz, Leipzig; S. Händler, Frankfurt; Wolf Neufeldt, Löbau; M. Kornblum, Biala; A. Kalinowski, Königsberg; S. Spandau, Berlin; J. Dudelkeim, Berlin; M. Kochmann, Schokken; Simon Friedmann, Berlin; Heinrich Gescheit, Berlin; Joseph Moses, Posen; H. Mairants, Berlin; N. Weinberg, Hamburg; E. Salomon, Langallen; Hugo Meyer, Hannover-Ahlem; A. Friedmann, Düsseldorf; Leopold Horwitz, Berlin; B. Holzmann, Bischofswerder; L. Schlesinger, Königsberg; J. J. Jacobsohn, Löbau; M. Birnbaum, Bad Flinsberg; Gerson Fischer, Hamburg; S. Buck, Berlin; Hirsch Kober, Kalisch; Sachs, Preussisch Friedland; D. L. Rubin, Kalisch; Bernhard Kuschinski, Landsberg; M. Loewenthal, Bad Harzburg; Isidor Zweig, Breslau; Ernst Domany, Frankfurt am Main; and Hans Falk, Breslau. A. B. Birnbaum, Preussisch-Herby, writes on behalf of his students, without naming a specific one. In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner." One item in Hebrew.

 
12 159 Cantorat (No. 185)
Cantor post
1912-1913
  

Correspondence with cantor applicants, the government, and others; internal correspondence of the Briesen Jewish Community Council; recommendation letters for applicants; letter of termination of Cantor Cohn, February 1913; and Briesen community's recommendation for Cohn upon his departure. Includes two telegrams. The community hires Salo Cohn, of Potsdam (writing from Kolmar in Posen), on a temporary basis, beginning October 1912; he serves until March 1913. Other applicants represented: Samuel Platus, Langallen; Hermann Tykoschinski, Leibitsch (also writes from Trier); F. Seegall, Posen; J. Margolies, Schönsee; Leopold Lowenthal, Wirsitz; Salo Lewin, Schwiebus; Ad. Goldberg, Berlin; S. L. Ehrlich, Baldenburg; H. Jospe, Gollub; Hermann Scheftelowitz, Gosel; Kozminski, Schmiegel; and Moritz Schlamm, Samotschin. Other correspondents include Aron Markus of the Neutomischel Jewish community, March 1913, inquiring about Cohn's service in Briesen. A letter of Scheftelowitz, January 1913, enclosing copies of his recommendations, is accompanied by a card with comments about the cantor search from Rabbi Halpersohn, who had apparently been sent the materials to review. In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner," custom printed for the records of the Jewish Community of Briesen. Some recommendation letters in Hebrew.

 
12 160 Kantor Georg Jospe (No. 188)
Cantor Georg Jospe
1912-1918
  

Application of Cantor Jospe, Fordon, December 1912; correspondence with Jospe, the government, and others; Rabbi Halpersohn's report on a test he administered to Jospe, and meeting circulars for Jospe's election, January 1913; attestation for Jospe from Fordon police; communal minutes/decisions; recommendation of the community for cantor M. Lent of Lipno, filling in for Jospe, 1914; contract and instructions for Jospe, April 1913; government notices concerning his military service (as telegraphist, stationed in Thorn); and circular for confidential meeting, 1918, concerning appeal for his deferment; and Jospe's resignation letter, 1918. Other correspondents include Verband der westpreussischen Synagogen-Gemeinden, 1914, concerning Jospe's being called up for military service; Jospe's wife, Rosa, 1914-1915, concerning payments; Berlin Jewish hospital, 1917, concerning treatment of Jospe’s sick child, and its costs; and Dr. W. Wolff, with report on examination of Jospe and invoice, 1917, and further certifications, 1918. Recurrent topics include the hiring of substitutes in Jospe's absence and petitions to the government for him to be granted leave, or for his return to service to be deferred, with occasional reference to Rabbi Neufeld's service as military chaplain, and one copy of a notice addressed to Neufeld, 1918. One item is the community's report of salaries of its employees, 1916, and another is a rations request, 1917. Other topics: collection of kosher meat tax slips; insurance for Jospe; his leaves from work; his presentation of the yahrzeit book; and a complaint of community member related to his saying of the "El Male Rachamim" (meaning "G-d full of compassion"), a memorial prayer for the deceased, 1917. Minutes of a communal meeting, 1917, concern complaints about Jospe’s exceeding leaves granted, and other matters, including rumors of his participation in black marketeering. Much of the outgoing correspondence is in the form of typed carbon copies. In the original commercial file cover "Stella Schnell-Ordner," custom printed for the records of the Jewish Community of Briesen.

 
12 161 Personnel matters – Miscellaneous 1887, 1913
  

In 1887: Form letter from the Marienwerder government office on the question of community employees being exempted from communal taxes; and a request by community employee M. Braun for a raise, upon his return to service after a serious illness. In 1913: Letter appointing Gustav Goetz as superintendent of the synagogue (Tempelvorsteher), for the month of September. Loose documents (3 items).

 
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