Guide to the Emery I. Gondor (1896-1977) Collection
Undated, 1912-2003, bulk 1926-1960

AR 25397

Processed by Kevin Schlottmann

Leo Baeck Institute

Center for Jewish History

15 West 16th Street

New York, N.Y. 10011

Phone: (212) 744-6400

Fax: (212) 988-1305

Email: http://www.lbi.org/ask

URL: http://www.lbi.org

© 2012 Leo Baeck Institute. All rights reserved.
Center for Jewish History, Publisher.
Electronic finding aid was encoded in EAD 2002 by Kevin Schlottmann in 2012. Description is in English.
October 14, 2014  Links to digital objects added in Container List.

Descriptive Summary

Creator: Gondor, Emery I.
Title: Emery I. Gondor Collection
Dates:undated, 1912-2003
Dates:bulk 1926-1960
Abstract: This collection primarily contains materials relating to Emery I. Gondor's varied career as an illustrator, creator of puzzles, photographer, and writer. It also includes some personal documents and vital records, as well as materials relating to Emery Gondor's brother, artist Bertalan Gondor. It is closely related to the collection AR 25085 (Papers of Emery and Bertalan Gondor).
Languages: This collection is primarily in English, with some Chinese, Danish, French, German, Hebrew, Hungarian, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish.
Quantity: 2 linear feet + 2 oversize folders
Identification: AR 25397
Repository: Leo Baeck Institute
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Biographical Note

Emerich (Emery) I. Gondor (1896-1977) was born in Budapest, Hungary to Karoly and Henriette (née Fried) Gondor. He attended the Royal Hungarian University and received his diploma from the National Academy of Art. As a young art teacher, he observed many children who had suffered during and after World War I and was inspired to learn more about their afflictions and the ways in which art could be used to help them. This prompted a lifelong interest in the field of psychology.

In Budapest, the psychoanalyst Sándor Ferenczi introduced Gondor to the subject of psychoanalysis and therapy. When Gondor moved to Vienna in 1920, to attend the Academy of Industrial Arts, he learned of Professor Csizeck's pioneering work in the field of progressive art education for children. He began working at the Viennese University Clinic, drawing and playing with emotionally disturbed children. From 1925 to 1926, Gondor attended seminars in Berlin and participated in the work of the Individual Psychological Association. He exhibited his own oil paintings during those years, lectured and worked as an illustrator for children's books and several newspapers. He was also named to the post of art director at Ullstein, Europe's largest publishing house.

Gondor immigrated to the United States in 1935 and became a citizen in 1941. During World War II, he worked for the War Department and was Chief of the Technical Operation Unit in the Overseas Service for France and Germany for two years. This unit performed classified work in counter-espionage. Gondor was also an instructor at the training schools in New York, France and Germany, where he taught about the psychological problems of counter-espionage as well as wrote several classified manuals on the subject.

After the war, Gondor was named head of the art and play therapy groups at the Retarded Children's Clinic and the Psychiatric Child Guidance Clinic at New York Medical College. In addition, he wrote and illustrated several books, created puzzles for dozens of comic books, and taught art to juvenile delinquents at Youth House.

In 1959, Gondor received his diploma in Clinical Psychology from New York State University. He became director of the art program at the Institute for Mental Retardation at New York Medical College in 1968. Emery Gondor died in 1977.

Bertalan Gondor was Emery Gondor's brother. Bertalan was born in 1908 in Budapest, Hungary. He studied art in Budapest and Vienna. After the Hungarian White Terror (1919-1920), he moved from Budapest to Vienna. Bertalan finally returned to Budapest once Austria was annexed in 1938. There he worked as an artist and an illustrator. During World War II, he was deported and conscripted into forced labor service in eastern Hungary. In March of 1944, Germany invaded Hungary and took control of the Hungarian ghettos and camps. Bertalan was then deported to Poland and placed in a camp called Harka. He died in March 1945 in the Mauthausen Concentration Camp.

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Scope and Content Note

This collection primarily contains materials relating to Emery I. Gondor's varied career as an illustrator, creator of puzzles, photographer, and writer. It also includes some personal documents and vital records, as well as materials relating to Emery Gondor's brother, artist Bertalan Gondor. It is closely related to the collection AR 25085 (Papers of Emery and Bertalan Gondor).

The personal documents in this collection include some educational documents, journalist identification cards and Hungarian passports, and some of Gondor's military documents. Also included are two expertly illustrated autograph books from the 1940s.

Most of the materials in this collection relate to Gondor's professional career as an illustrator, creator of puzzles, photographer, and writer, primarily from his years in the United States. He worked on a wide range of publications, including books of manners, literature, children's stories, comic books, magazines, and newspapers. The items include working materials such as individual printed pages, drafts, transparencies, sketches, printing plates, proofs, correspondence, and reproductions of sketches. The collection also contains many finished products, such as published books, journals, and comic books. Additional material about Gondor's work in Germany and Austria in the 1920s and early 1930s is found in AR 25085 (Papers of Emery and Bertalan Gondor).

The collection also contains a variety of other materials related to Emery Gondor's professional life as an artist, such as correspondence and photographs of his artwork.

The materials relating to Emery Gondor's brother, artist Bertalan Gondor, include correspondence from Bertalan to his wife Lily in 1944. A small amount of original work is found here, including drawings in newspapers and a handwritten poem. Some vital documents and scholarly work about Bertalan are also included.

This collection contains very little information about Gondor's career as a psychologist.

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Arrangement

This collection is divided into three series. The first two series contain personal and professional materials related to Emery Gondor, while the third series contains materials by and about his brother Bertalan Gondor.

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Access and Use

Access Restrictions

This collection is open to researchers.

Access Information

Collection is digitized. Follow the links in the Container List to access the digitized materials.

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Access Points

Click on a subject to search that term in the Center's catalog. Return to the Top of Page

Related Material

This collection is closely related to AR 25085 (Papers of Emery and Bertalan Gondor). The collections have some overlap, but AR 25085 has more personal material and more of Gondor's work from Germany and Austria, while this collection has more material concerning Gondor's professional publishing work in the United States, both work-product and published materials.

Two of Bertalan Gondor's works have been digitized, Dream, Labor Battalion and Dream. Over the Hills-Labour Battalion.

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Separated Material

Bertalan Gondor prints from the 1930s were removed to the LBI Arts and Objects collection, as were sketches of and for Emery Gondor by the artist Vertes.

The following books were removed to the LBI Library:

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Preferred Citation

Published citations should take the following form:

Identification of item, date (if known); Emery I. Gondor Collection; AR 25397; box number; folder number; Leo Baeck Institute.

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Processing Information

Materials were rearranged into series. Plastic sleeves, duplicates, and envelopes were removed. Photocopies were made of articles in complete journals and newspapers, and the originals discarded.

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Container List

The following section contains a detailed listing of the materials in the collection.

Follow the links to access the digitized materials.

 

Series I: Personal, undated, 1912-1967

This series is in English, with some French, German, Hungarian, and Russian.
0.5 linear feet + oversize materials
Scope and Content:

This series contains personal documents and some vital records of Emery Gondor. Educational documents include transcripts from secondary school and university in Hungary, as well as diplomas and certificates relating to Gondor's career in psychology in the United States. The vital documents include journalist identification cards, Hungarian passports, and a marriage certificate. The series also contains a few of Gondor's military documents, notably a special 1946 leave order allowing him to visit his father in Budapest. It also includes a music theory pamphlet by Paul Emerich and a piece of printed music.

The series also contains a birthday card and two illustrated autograph books. They appear to be from Gondor's time in the civilian censorship division of the army. One autograph book appears to have been in a ring binder, and among many other things contains an illustrated alphabet. The other autograph book is bound, and appears to be a book for visitors while Gondor was in the hospital. The illustrations are mostly pencil or ink, and some also have water color. Both also have materials such as letters and clippings pasted in.

BoxFolderTitleDate
11Educational documents1912-1967
BoxFolderTitleDate
OS145Educational documents1959
BoxFolderTitleDate
12Employment book1913-1919
13Military documents1946-1947
14Naturalization certificate1941
15Vital documents1928-1942
16Autograph book1946
17Autograph book leaves1944-1946
18Autograph book leaves1944-1946
19Birthday cardCirca 1947
110MusicUndated, 1949
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Series II: Professional, undated, 1914-2003, bulk 1936-1960

This series is primarily in English, with some Chinese, Danish, German, Hebrew, Hungarian, Portuguese, and Spanish.
1.3 linear feet + oversize material
Arrangement:

This series is divided into two subseries. The first contains Gondor's published material and the underlying work product, while the second contains additional professional materials.

Scope and Content:

This series contains materials relating to Gondor's career as an illustrator, creator of puzzles, photographer, and writer. He worked on a wide range of publications, including books of manners, literature, children's stories, comic books, magazines, and newspapers. It also contains posters, newspaper articles, and a few publications in the field of psychology, his other specialty.

Most of the series consists of working materials such as individual printed pages, drafts, transparencies, sketches, printing plates, proofs, correspondence, and reproductions of sketches. These are separated from published books, journals, and comic books, which are grouped together at the end of each section of the subseries.

This series also contains a variety of other materials related to Emery Gondor's professional life as an artist. These include photographs he took in Berlin in the 1920s and correspondence with a variety of people and institutions, including the writer Erich Kaestner and the Ullstein publishing house. It also includes photographs of his art work, informational materials such as a CV, obituaries, and Who's Who entries, the United States copyright registrations for some of his work, and photocopies of inscriptions and titles pages of books dedicated to Gondor. The series also contains correspondence between the Jewish Museum in Berlin and his daughter Erika about Gondor's works in the museum's collection.

Subseries 1: Publications, undated, 1914-1973, bulk 1936-1960

This subseries is primarily in English, with some Chinese, Danish, German, Hebrew, Hungarian, Portuguese, and Spanish.
Arrangement:

This subseries is divided into two sections: Books, Pamphlets, and Posters, and Comic Books. The series is arranged alphabetically by title within each section. Working materials are separated from published books, journals, and comic books, which are grouped together at the end of each section.

Scope and Content:

This subseries primarily contains materials relating to Gondor's career as an illustrator, creator of puzzles, photographer, and writer. He worked on a wide range of publications, including books of manners, literature, children's stories, comic books, magazines, and newspapers. It also contains posters, newspaper articles, and some psychology publications.

Most of the subseries consists of working materials such as individual printed pages, drafts, transparencies, sketches, printing plates, proofs, correspondence, and reproductions of sketches. These are separated from published books, journals, and comic books, which are grouped together at the end of each section of the subseries. Many of the published children's books have dedications from Gondor to his daughter Erika.

This subseries is divided into two sections, based on the type of publication. The Books, Pamphlets, and Posters section includes materials relating to book covers, book and magazine illustrations, and other items such as Christmas cards and pamphlets. The actual published items are grouped together at the end of the section. This section also includes a folder of clippings of Gondor's work for newspapers, as a print and photo journalist and as an illustrator. He started with Hungarian newspapers, but soon moved to Berlin where he worked primarily for the Morgenpost and the Ullstein publishing house, and later to Vienna. Finally, it also includes a few of Gondor's publications in the area of psychology, his other professional specialty.

The Comic Books section contains Gondor's work, primarily during the 1950s, creating puzzles, connect-the-dots, and other games for comic books. The full comic books are grouped together at the end of the section.

Section I: Books, Pamphlets, and Posters

BoxFolderTitleDate
111Adventures in ScienceUndated
112Better than Beauty: A Guide to Charm1938
113Christmas cardsUndated
114Cut Out Zoo1940
BoxFolderTitleDate
OS145Cut Out Zoo1940
BoxFolderTitleDate
115Cut Out Zoo photographs1942
116Germinal Circle exhibitionCirca 1921
117Johnny Get Your Money's Worth1938
118Marriages are Made at Home1938
119Mr. Gondor Comes to America1936
120New Cut Out Zoo1962-1973
121Newspaper clippings1914-1941
BoxFolderTitleDate
OS145Newspaper clippings1942-1951
BoxFolderTitleDate
122Personal Conduct for the Soldier1949
BoxFolderTitleDate
OS145PostersUndated, 1920s
BoxFolderTitleDate
123The Plough and the Sword1938
124Psychology publications1941-1970
BoxFolderTitleDate
OS145Sadko record coverUndated
BoxFolderTitleDate
125The Secret Zoo1943
BoxFolderTitleDate
OS145The Secret Zoo1943
BoxFolderTitleDate
126Shiver1938
127Squirly the Curly Pig1941
BoxFolderTitleDate
128Admiral Bobby (book)1932
129American-Hungarian Medical Association (pamphlet)1945
130Better than Beauty: A Guide to Charm (book)1938
131Cut Out Zoo (book)1940
132Fritz Freeman wird Reporter1932
133Germinal (journal)Undated
134Gold Watch (הזהב שעון)1956
BoxFolderTitleDate
21Illustrierte Gesundheitsschriften fuer das berufstaetige Volk (pamphlets)1932?
22Personal Conduct for the Soldier (book)1949
23Purim Spiel (pamphlet)1948
24The Secret Zoo (book)1943
25Shiver (book)1938
26Squirly the Curly Pig (book)1941
27Tu Bishvat pageant (pamphlet)1947
28Der Verein das Kreide-Dreieck erforscht die Geheimnisse der Erwachsene (book)1932
29You Are… (book)1937

Section II: Comic Books

BoxFolderTitleDate
210Bugs Bunny1952
211Calling All KidsUndated
212Crazy Cat1951
213Felix the CatUndated
214Flash Gordon1953
215Funny Book1943-1961
BoxFolderTitleDate
216Gene Autry1951-1955
217Howdy DoodyUndated, 1950
BoxFolderTitleDate
218Indian Chief1953
219Lassie1959-1960
220Little Lulu1954
221Lone Ranger1958-1960
222Mister Softee1961
223Nancy and Sluggo1960
224OswaldUndated, 1951
225PopeyeUndated
226Porky Pig1952
227Rin Tin Tin1957
228Rocky1960
229Roy RogersUndated, 1951-1957
230Roy and Santa1951-1957
231Santa Claus1949-1953
232Santa's WorkshopUndated
233Space Cadet1952
234Tarzan1951-1952
235Tom and Jerry1951-1952
236VariousUndated, 1955-1961
237Published comic books1940s-1960s

Subseries 2: Various, undated, 1920s-2003

This subseries is in German and English, with some Hungarian.
Scope and Content:

This subseries contains a variety of other materials related to Emery Gondor's professional life. These include photographs he took in Berlin in the 1920s and correspondence with a variety of people and institutions, including the writer Erich Kaestner and the Ullstein publishing house. It also includes photographs of his art work, informational materials such as a CV, obituaries, and Who's Who entries, the United States copyright registrations for some of his work, and photocopies of inscriptions and titles pages of books dedicated to Gondor. The subseries also contains correspondence between the Jewish Museum in Berlin and his daughter Erika about Gondor's works in the museum's collection.

BoxFolderTitleDate
238Austrian Institute1975
239Book dedications1931-1969
  

Photocopies

 
240Copyrights1937-1962
241Correspondence1926-1955
242CVUndated
243Jewish Museum, Berlin1975-2003
244Jewish Museum, Berlin (caricatures)2002?
245Jewish Museum, Berlin (photographs)2002?
246Kaestner, Erich1959-1969
247Letters of reference1923-1936
248Obituaries and Who's Who entries1943, 1978
249Photographs by Gondor1920s?
250Photographs of drawings1920s?
BoxFolderTitleDate
OS145Photographs of drawings1920s?
BoxFolderTitleDate
251Photograph of Gondor1920s?
252Psychology1950-1964
253Ullstein1927-1941
254VariousUndated, 1926-1943
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Series III: Bertalan Gondor, undated, 1926-1960

This series is in German, English, and Hungarian.
6 folders + oversize material
Scope and Content:

This series contains materials relating to Emery Gondor's brother, artist Bertalan Gondor. He was born in 1908 in Budapest, Hungary. He studied art in Budapest and Vienna. After the Hungarian White Terror (1919-1920), he moved from Budapest to Vienna. Bertalan finally returned to Budapest once Austria was annexed in 1938. There he worked as an artist and an illustrator. During World War II, he was deported and conscripted into forced labor service in eastern Hungary. In March of 1944, Germany invaded Hungary and took control of the Hungarian ghettos and camps. Bertalan was then deported to Poland and placed in a camp called Harka. He died in March 1945 in the Mauthausen Concentration Camp.

The correspondence is mostly from Bertalan to his wife Lily in 1944, and is in German. A small amount of original work is found here, including drawings in newspapers and a handwritten poem. The vital documents include identification documents, his wife Lily's certificate of baptism, and a death certificate. The series also contains clippings and scholarly articles about Gondor and his work, a poster for a 1962 exhibit, and some miscellaneous documents.

Prints from the 1930s were removed to the LBI Arts and Objects collection.

BoxFolderTitleDate
255ClippingsUndated, 1926-1947
256Correspondence1935, 1944
257Original WorkUndated, 1932-1942
BoxFolderTitleDate
OS145Poster for exhibit1962
BoxFolderTitleDate
258Scholarly articles1962-1978
259Various1949-2003
260Vital documents1938-1960
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