Guide to the Records of the Columbia Religious and Industrial School for Jewish Girls (New York, N.Y.), undated, 1905-1944
 
*I-24

Processed by Abigail Lawrence and Felicia Herman

American Jewish Historical Society

Center for Jewish History

15 West 16th Street

New York, N.Y. 10011

Phone: (212) 294-6160

Fax: (212) 294-6161

Email: reference@ajhs.org

URL: http://www.ajhs.org

© 2014, American Jewish Historical Society, Boston, MA and New York, NY. All Rights Reserved.
Finding aid was processed by Abigail Lawrence in December 1992 and Felicia Herman in August 1996. The finding aid was reformatted by Marvin Rusinek in January 2007. Finding aid was encoded by Marvin Rusinek on January 17, 2007. Description is in English.

Descriptive Summary

Creator: Columbia Religious and Industrial School for Jewish Girls (New York, N.Y.)
Title: Columbia Religious and Industrial School for Jewish Girls (New York, N.Y.) records
Dates:undated, 1905-1944
Abstract: Contains correspondence, financial data, and reports (some published) on the work and activities of the School. Among the officers were N. Taylor Phillips, treasurer, and his wife, Rosalie Solomons Phillips, president and first vice president.
Languages: The collection is in English.
Quantity: 0.25 linear feet (1 one-half manuscript box)
Identification: I-24
Repository: American Jewish Historical Society
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Historical Sketch

Columbia Religious and Industrial School for Jewish Girls (1888-1944?)

Founded in 1888 by Adolph Benjamin and Adolphus Solomons, the Columbia Religious and Industrial School for Jewish Girls was created as a protection against the many Christian missionaries on the Lower East Side of New York. It was originally located at 120 Columbia Street, but it went through numerous changes of location, including East 3rd Street, East 5th Street, and Eldridge Street. Lack of space is mentioned several times as a reason for turning away hundreds of children, and in the President's Annual Report for 1910, Lewis Isaacs, Acting President, simply states that none of the residences were "wholly satisfactory," and that he hopes that their current location will "invite a broadening of [the school's] sphere of influence."1

In 1907, the school claimed to serve a total of 1,000 pupils per week in its Sunday School, Saturday afternoon services, and Industrial classes held four afternoons every week. Most of the students were described as being "from the poorest elements of [the Lower East Side], and… of Gaelican and Hungarian parentage."2

The Industrial branch of the school taught sewing by hand as well as by machine, mending, embroidery, cutting, and garment-making to about 200-300 girls per afternoon. These classes were held in two sessions in order to have enough space to accommodate all the students. At the end of each class, the girls were dismissed with a hymn, a prayer, or a short uplifting talk. The girls were apparently eager to learn, and were described as "clean and neat."3 One of their assignments included sewing their own graduation gowns. The Industrial classes were meant to occupy girls' time so that they would not have time to be ensnared by Missionaries, and to teach them the skills they would need to run a Jewish home, as well as to create a Jewish female network to bind future Jewish women to the Jewish community.

The Religious branch of the school, headed by students from the Jewish Theological Seminary, served about 120 pupils. This branch consisted of Saturday afternoon services and Sunday School classes in which students learned the "tenets of Jewish doctrine, Bible history, and Hebrew."4 There were nearly two times as many students attending the industrial classes than the religious activities of the school.

The Jewish Theological Seminary supplied the teachers for the school and Solomon Schecter's wife, Mathilde Schecter, was active on the Columbia School Board of Directors. In the 1907 Annual Report she wrote the Annual report of the President under the title of Vice President and Acting President, in which she discusses the virtues of the school's efforts to "keep sacred and alive every little flame of Jewish home life, the holiness, the reverence for authority and religion, and harmonize the old and the new elements in [the children's] lives."5

Other benefits pupils received through their participation in the Columbia School include: instruction in singing, exposure to nature and the wilderness during July outings and excursions, ice cream treats in the summer, help in finding employment for the family members of the students, and after graduation, involvement in the Alumnae Club.

The Alumnae Club was composed of about 500 women and girls, both graduates of and teachers at the school, who met regularly for "religious and educational uplift."6 Many alumni taught at the school. The School found it important to keep close ties with the Alumnae Club and the graduates "during their young womanhood, that subtle period of life when girls develop the best of the worst instincts of their future."7 The Alumnae Club sponsored evenings of entertainment, a Purim dance, anniversary celebrations, and other "occasional social meetings [that] serve to strengthen the bond of union and devotion to the School."8

Not only were graduates and members of the Alumnae Club supportive of the Columbia Religious and Industrial School. Though Lewis Isaacs, in his Annual report of 1910, claimed that the school was proud to be "unobtrusive and little known among the uptown Jews of the city,"9 the school was well-loved by the neighborhoods it served and the families of the students. Poor workers, parents of the pupils, would often contribute 5 or 10 cents of their earnings regularly to pay their share of the school's expenses from books, repairs, and holiday celebrations. Mothers of the students cooked food for these celebrations, met once a month in social gatherings, and supported the "practical good their daughters derive[d] from the industrial instruction." Fathers of the students supposedly supported the school because of "the thoroughly Jewish spirit prevailing throughout [the school], which [made] it a safeguard against the surrounding missionary activities."10

By 1911, President Pauline Sternberger wrote in her Annual Report that "the school has been very successful in offsetting the Christian missionaries, as the children comprehend the evil of the mission." The 1907 report also states that the school "so effectually performed its work that the missionaries have for the most part ceased their efforts at conversion, and have left the school free to pursue more constructive work."11

The Columbia School acknowledged that for the poor Jewish immigrants on the Lower East Side of New York, "with their crowded, unattractive homes, it is natural that the children grasp eagerly at the kind treatment, beauty, and entertainment held out to them by the Mission Schools."12 The founders of the Columbia School hoped that by giving children a strong connection to Judaism, they would be able to resist Christian missionary's tactics in which Jewish children were "urged to forsake the Faith of their parents."13 In a scene in the "Vignettes From the Life of the Alumnae Club" performed at a pageant in honor of the Club's 35th anniversary, students demonstrate their own fear of missionaries, as a young girl, upon meeting her new teacher, whispers to a friend, "I'll bet she's a Chrischt! I'll bet she's pretending she's the leader, but she's only one of those Missionaries who want to fa-fier us… I told you she's a Chrischt! That's how all Missionaries begin. First they fool you in with bible stories, then they take you someplace and they burn a cross on your chest."14 Indeed, the fear of Missionaries influencing Jewish children was great and induced action to counter the threat. An interesting tactic of the school, mentioned briefly in the 1907 President's Annual Report by Mathilde Schecter, was to imitate the way in which the Missionaries got the attention of Jewish children. Schecter describes how Reverend Lewis B. Michaelson, Superintendent of the School, works in "the manner of a Jewish Salvation Army officer,"15 copying the discipline, methods, and speech of missionaries. In general, the School educated its students on the belief that "[We must not], the largest Jewish community in the world, allow little, innocent souls to be neglected, especially where there are so many watching for the opportunity of profiting by such neglect. Our children must be made conscious that they are under the loving care of Jewish eyes and Jewish guardians."16

By educating Jewish girls and keeping them in contact with the Jewish community even after their graduation through the Alumnae Club, the Jewish community will be guaranteed active Jewish mothers and wives who will keep Judaism alive in the home. Indeed, the school often measured its success by how many of its graduates married respectable Jewish men. Pauline Sternberger, in her 1911 Annual President's Report, notes the four marriages that year of Columbia School graduates to "estimable young men, proving the good training given to those girls during their school life at the Columbia School."17 In the Vignettes from the Alumnae Club, a whole scene is dedicated to the marriages of Columbia School girls, in which the commentator notes with pride that "more of our girls married between 1930 and 1931, than half a dozen years before and after, combined."18 The Columbia School strived to create desirable American Jewish girls who would marry well and keep Judaism alive, or as Lewis Isaacs put it, to "develop respectable, religious, and industrious Jewish women."19 Mathilde Schecter connected this goal to another goal of the school, the Americanization of Jewish immigrants, when she wrote: "They will be good, clean, moral Jewish girls, and by keeping the Jewish ideals they will naturally become most desirable Americans. The Jew, and the Jewess more so, is quick and adaptable, and through the wonderful American school, they get at the channel of what is best in American institutions. The Columbia School for Jewish Girls enters into this new patriotic interest of the immigrant child wisely, not hysterically."20

During the mid-1930s and 1940s, the school experienced serious financial difficulties, owing to a combination of the Depression and the long-held view that Jews in America should keep quiet and take care of themselves without asking for outside help, a view that the school internalized through its pride that "our work is quiet and unobtrusive… the community at large hardly knows of our existence."21 Several supporters of the school had died and left some money for financing the school, but by 1943 these funds were exhausted. In an anonymous rough draft of a letter dated 1943 asking former contributors and their descendants for annual contributions, the author writes that the school was originally supported by voluntary contributions and dues until the Federation for the Support of Jewish Philanthropic Societies was organized, at which point the income of the school was derived from assorted legacies, which were invested, but now depleted. The author stated that owing to "present conditions," it was unwise to ask the public for the funds needed to keep the school open, but that unless the school received financial assistance, it would close on May 31, 1944. Later, however, in a note dated after June 1944, to the Honorary President in 1944, (Mrs. N. Taylor Phillips, daughter of founder Adolphus Solomons), President Rose Kaye wrote, "Thank God the school will live."22 The latest date of anything in the files is July 1944.

The establishment of the Columbia Religious and Industrial School for Jewish Girls attests to the seriousness of the threats to the Jewish community during the crisis of the late 19th century. The possibility of losing too many Jewish immigrant children and families to Christian missionaries was very real to Jews on the Lower East Side of New York. The fact that the Jewish community chose to respond to this crisis through educating the Jewish girls, providing for them a network of caring and dedicated Jews to serve as role models and to encourage them to keep close ties to their Jewish community, and maintaining the school despite financial difficulties, exemplifies a clever and meaningful strategy for preserving American Judaism.

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Scope and Content Note

The records of the Columbia Religious and Industrial School for Jewish Girls include annual reports, correspondence, financial records, officers' lists, publicity information, program of events, and a script for a play performed by the Alumnae Club of the school.

Financial records include records of donations, bequests, investments, and teachers' salaries and other expenses. Two entertainment programs, each provided by the Alumnae Club, date from 1908 and 1941. Correspondence primarily relates to Treasurer Napthali Taylor Phillips and his wife, President Rosalie Phillips. Annual reports are limited to 1907, 1910, and 1911. A large portion of the records between the mid-1910s to the early 1930s are lacking in the files.

The records are valuable for researchers interested in Jewish religious and vocational education for girls, women in charitable organizations, americanization of immigrants, the Lower East Side, and missionary work. Significant correspondents include Rosalie Solomons Phillips, Adolphus Solomons, and Naphtali Taylor Phillips. Other figures involved with the school are Mathilde (Mrs. Solomon) Schechter, Rosalie Rebecca (Mrs. H. Pereira) Mendes, Esther Ruskay, and Mrs. Jacob Schiff.

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Arrangement

The collection consists of a single series arranged by topic.

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Access and Use

Access Restrictions

The collection is open to all researchers by permission of the Director of Library and Archives of the American Jewish Historical Society, except items that are restricted due to their fragility.

Use Restrictions

Information concerning the literary rights may be obtained from the Executive Director of the American Jewish Historical Society. Users must apply in writing for permission to quote, reproduce or otherwise publish manuscript materials found in this collection. For more information contact:
American Jewish Historical Society, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY, 10011
email: reference@ajhs.org

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Related Material

Rosalie Solomons Phillips Papers, P-17.

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Preferred Citation

Published citations should take the following form:
Identification of item, date (if known); Columbia Religious and Industrial School for Jewish Girls (New York, N.Y.) records; I-24; box number; folder number; American Jewish Historical Society, New York, NY, and Boston, MA.

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Access Points

Click on a subject to search that term in the Center's catalog. Return to the Top of Page

Container List

The following section contains a detailed listing of the materials in the collection.

 

Records of the Columbia Religious and Industrial School for Jewish Girls, undated, 1905-1944

The collection is in English.
0.25 linear feet (9 folders)
Arrangement:

The folders are arranged by topic.

Scope and Content:

See the collection Scope and Content Note.

BoxFolderTitleDate
11Financial Data - Minutes Re: Sale of a Mortgage, Will of Edwin Sternbergerundated, 1921, 1924, 1939-1941
  1) Entitled "Extract from the last will and testament and codicil thereto of Edwin Sternberger."December 16, 1921
  

Mentions the sum of money Sternberger wished to leave the Columbia School and other conditions surrounding his will.

BoxFolderTitleDate
111) Entitled "Extract from the last will and testament and codicil thereto of Edwin Sternberger."December 16, 1921
  

Mentions the sum of money Sternberger wished to leave the Columbia School and other conditions surrounding his will.

 
  2) Letter to Mrs. N. Taylor Phillips from the secretary of Mr. Clifford Seasongood.November 9, 1939
  

Enclosing a copy of Sternberger's will.

112) Letter to Mrs. N. Taylor Phillips from the secretary of Mr. Clifford Seasongood.November 9, 1939
  

Enclosing a copy of Sternberger's will.

 
  3) Unclear as to what this is - perhaps a receipt.January 12, 1940
  

A scrap of paper with the statement, "I hereby agree to the Rules and regulations of the Broadway Savings bank and any amendments or additions that may be hereafter be made." It is signed by the Treasurer (the signature is illegible).

113) Unclear as to what this is - perhaps a receipt.January 12, 1940
  

A scrap of paper with the statement, "I hereby agree to the Rules and regulations of the Broadway Savings bank and any amendments or additions that may be hereafter be made." It is signed by the Treasurer (the signature is illegible).

 
  4) The same as above, condensed on a small card.January 12, 1940
114) The same as above, condensed on a small card.January 12, 1940
  5) A note on plain scrap paper, reading: "Re: Edwin Sternberger: Date of Death - November 1, 1924, Probate - December 5, 1924."undated
115) A note on plain scrap paper, reading: "Re: Edwin Sternberger: Date of Death - November 1, 1924, Probate - December 5, 1924."undated
  6) "Resolution of the Board of Managers of the Columbia Religious and Industrial School for Jewish Girls, Duly adopted at a meeting of the said board, held on the 14th day of December, 1939…"December 14, 1939
  

States what the treasurer must do with the money left by Edwin Sternberger.

116) "Resolution of the Board of Managers of the Columbia Religious and Industrial School for Jewish Girls, Duly adopted at a meeting of the said board, held on the 14th day of December, 1939…"December 14, 1939
  

States what the treasurer must do with the money left by Edwin Sternberger.

 
  7) Extract from the minutes of a meeting of the Board of Managers concerning the treasurer's job in handling the money left by Sternberger.January 11, 1940
117) Extract from the minutes of a meeting of the Board of Managers concerning the treasurer's job in handling the money left by Sternberger.January 11, 1940
  8) Letter from Mrs. Ethel B. Riess, Corresponding Secretary, to Mr. N. Taylor Phillips, Treasurer.April 18, 1941
  

Informs him that his resolution was passed, giving him the power to dispose of the mortgage.

118) Letter from Mrs. Ethel B. Riess, Corresponding Secretary, to Mr. N. Taylor Phillips, Treasurer.April 18, 1941
  

Informs him that his resolution was passed, giving him the power to dispose of the mortgage.

 
  9) Letter to Mr. Phillips from Clifford Seasongood.August 4, 1941
  

The handwriting is hard to read, except for the sentence, "I… regretfully… must decline to accept the proposed mission…"

119) Letter to Mr. Phillips from Clifford Seasongood.August 4, 1941
  

The handwriting is hard to read, except for the sentence, "I… regretfully… must decline to accept the proposed mission…"

 
  10) Letter to Mr. Seasongood from Mr. Phillips.August 29, 1941
  

Asking his advice on the necessity of cashing in the mortgage in order to continue the school.

1110) Letter to Mr. Seasongood from Mr. Phillips.August 29, 1941
  

Asking his advice on the necessity of cashing in the mortgage in order to continue the school.

 
  11) Letter from Mr. Phillips to Mr. Seasongood.September 9, 1941
  

Asking for approval of his plan to invest the money.

1111) Letter from Mr. Phillips to Mr. Seasongood.September 9, 1941
  

Asking for approval of his plan to invest the money.

 
  12) Memorandum from the October meeting of the Board of Managers discussing the Treasurer's actions regarding the mortgage.undated
1112) Memorandum from the October meeting of the Board of Managers discussing the Treasurer's actions regarding the mortgage.undated
  13) Memo "to be entered in check book" noting a $3,012.50 deposit in the account.October 2, 1941
1113) Memo "to be entered in check book" noting a $3,012.50 deposit in the account.October 2, 1941
  14) Copy of a letter to Mr. Phillips from Mr. Seasongood suggesting the sale of the Freemont St. mortgage "at par upon the theory that this asset is the property of the school free from any trust."September 11, 1941
1114) Copy of a letter to Mr. Phillips from Mr. Seasongood suggesting the sale of the Freemont St. mortgage "at par upon the theory that this asset is the property of the school free from any trust."September 11, 1941
  15) Resolutions adopted at the Board of Managers meeting concerning the treasurer's duties in regard to the mortgage.
October 9, 1941
1115) Resolutions adopted at the Board of Managers meeting concerning the treasurer's duties in regard to the mortgage.
October 9, 1941
12List of Officers, Appeal for Financial Support, etc.undated, 1905, 1944
  1) Rough draft of an unaddressed and unsigned handwritten letter.undated
  

Giving a history of the school and asking for financial support from the descendants of past contributors.

BoxFolderTitleDate
121) Rough draft of an unaddressed and unsigned handwritten letter.undated
  

Giving a history of the school and asking for financial support from the descendants of past contributors.

 
  2) Pamphlet entitled Sewing and Religious ClassesMarch 3, 1905
  

Giving another history of the school as well as a description of the services the school offers. It invites visitors to see the school any day between three o'clock and five o'clock. A list of officers is included.

122) Pamphlet entitled Sewing and Religious ClassesMarch 3, 1905
  

Giving another history of the school as well as a description of the services the school offers. It invites visitors to see the school any day between three o'clock and five o'clock. A list of officers is included.

 
  3) A handwritten list of the Officers and the Board of Directors.June 1944
123) A handwritten list of the Officers and the Board of Directors.June 1944
13Financial Data - Re: Will and Deed of Trust of Louise S. Hendricks1925, 1932, 1936, 1939
  1) A handwritten note from Taylor Phillips, Treasurer.April 10, 1936
  

Stating that the school will receive an additional $4,000 (1/23 share) from the residuary estate of Louise S. Hendricks.

BoxFolderTitleDate
131) A handwritten note from Taylor Phillips, Treasurer.April 10, 1936
  

Stating that the school will receive an additional $4,000 (1/23 share) from the residuary estate of Louise S. Hendricks.

 
  2) Same as above, typed.April 10, 1936
132) Same as above, typed.April 10, 1936
  3) Letter to the Trust Department of U.S. Trust Company from the Treasurer of the School.April 13, 1939
  

Asking if the School will receive further legacy under Hendricks will due to the death of Ottilie Bourqui, or under her husband's will.

133) Letter to the Trust Department of U.S. Trust Company from the Treasurer of the School.April 13, 1939
  

Asking if the School will receive further legacy under Hendricks will due to the death of Ottilie Bourqui, or under her husband's will.

 
  4) Letter to Mr. Montague N. Hendricks from Taylor Phillips.April 19, 1939
  

Notifying him that he will receive money upon the death of Miss Bourqui.

134) Letter to Mr. Montague N. Hendricks from Taylor Phillips.April 19, 1939
  

Notifying him that he will receive money upon the death of Miss Bourqui.

 
  5) Letter from the U.S. Trust Company in response to Item 3.April 14, 1939
  

Encloses a copy of the will of Hendricks.

135) Letter from the U.S. Trust Company in response to Item 3.April 14, 1939
  

Encloses a copy of the will of Hendricks.

 
  6) Copy of the Last Will and Testament of Louise S. Hendricks.June 24, 1932
  

Mentioning that the Columbia School is to receive a remainder of her estate.

136) Copy of the Last Will and Testament of Louise S. Hendricks.June 24, 1932
  

Mentioning that the Columbia School is to receive a remainder of her estate.

 
  7) A five-page indenture made between Hendricks and Bourqui.October 7, 1925
137) A five-page indenture made between Hendricks and Bourqui.October 7, 1925
14Financial Data - Receiptsundated, 1941-1943
  1) A handwritten paper signed by Albert Jones.October 2, 1941
  

A receipt for $40 for the rental of rooms at 133 Eldridge Street during the month of October.

BoxFolderTitleDate
141) A handwritten paper signed by Albert Jones.October 2, 1941
  

A receipt for $40 for the rental of rooms at 133 Eldridge Street during the month of October.

 
  2-16) Same as above, for most months from November 1941 to May 1943. November 1941-May 1943
142-16) Same as above, for most months from November 1941 to May 1943. November 1941-May 1943
  17) Bill for a magazine entitled World Over, which the school got three copies of every month, claiming it is "very helpful for the teachers." January 1, 1942
1417) Bill for a magazine entitled World Over, which the school got three copies of every month, claiming it is "very helpful for the teachers." January 1, 1942
  18) Receipt for aforementioned magazine.February 9, 1942
1418) Receipt for aforementioned magazine.February 9, 1942
  19) Receipt from United Stationary and Toy Co. for two games totaling $2.30.February 26, 1952
1419) Receipt from United Stationary and Toy Co. for two games totaling $2.30.February 26, 1952
  20) Receipt from Manny's Shoes, Inc., for 17 pairs of shoes and 40 pairs of socks.March 24, 1942
1420) Receipt from Manny's Shoes, Inc., for 17 pairs of shoes and 40 pairs of socks.March 24, 1942
  21) Receipt from Saul Schenker, publisher and importer of Hebrew books and music, for seven Bibles and six diplomas.May 19, 1942
1421) Receipt from Saul Schenker, publisher and importer of Hebrew books and music, for seven Bibles and six diplomas.May 19, 1942
  22) Receipt from the Settlement Shop for a dish and engraving. June 1, 1942
1422) Receipt from the Settlement Shop for a dish and engraving. June 1, 1942
  23) Receipt from the Lipsius Press General Printers for an illegible item.October 4, 1943
1423) Receipt from the Lipsius Press General Printers for an illegible item.October 4, 1943
  24) Receipt from same as above for postals.October 13, 1943
1424) Receipt from same as above for postals.October 13, 1943
  25) Notice to stockholders from The Standard Safe Deposit CompanyDecember 27, 1943
  

Announcing the Regular Annual Meeting of the stockholders to be held on January 18, 1944.

1425) Notice to stockholders from The Standard Safe Deposit CompanyDecember 27, 1943
  

Announcing the Regular Annual Meeting of the stockholders to be held on January 18, 1944.

 
  26) Empty, large brown envelope from the NY Historical Society to N. Taylor Phillips with penciled mathematics on the back.undated
1426) Empty, large brown envelope from the NY Historical Society to N. Taylor Phillips with penciled mathematics on the back.undated
15Program of Entertainment Given by the Alumnae ClubMarch 29, 1908
  1) The program for entertainment given by the Alumnae Club at the Girls Hebrew Technical Hall in 1908.March 29, 1908
  

It lists the songs, recitations, dialogues, instrumental music, and addresses to be performed, many focusing on biblical women. A list of officers is also included in the program.

BoxFolderTitleDate
151) The program for entertainment given by the Alumnae Club at the Girls Hebrew Technical Hall in 1908.March 29, 1908
  

It lists the songs, recitations, dialogues, instrumental music, and addresses to be performed, many focusing on biblical women. A list of officers is also included in the program.

 
16Financial Data - Expenditures, Bank Book, etc.1907, 1914, 1933, 1936, 1941-1944
  1) Pamphlet announcing the Annual Meeting of the School and stating the accounts of the school.November 17, 1914
  

Issued in place of "the usual annual report, as the finances of the School demand the most rigid economy."

BoxFolderTitleDate
161) Pamphlet announcing the Annual Meeting of the School and stating the accounts of the school.November 17, 1914
  

Issued in place of "the usual annual report, as the finances of the School demand the most rigid economy."

 
  2) Bank Book from the Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank in New York City.January 13, 1936
162) Bank Book from the Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank in New York City.January 13, 1936
  3) A copy of Item 1, with illegible handwriting inside.November 17, 1914
163) A copy of Item 1, with illegible handwriting inside.November 17, 1914
  4) Note, unaddressed, from Sophie Goldstein, wishing a pleasant summer and listing the teachers salaries.June 30, 1933
164) Note, unaddressed, from Sophie Goldstein, wishing a pleasant summer and listing the teachers salaries.June 30, 1933
  5) Teachers salaries and expenses (including postage, sewing materials, and snack food) submitted by Sophie Goldstein.June 4, 1933
165) Teachers salaries and expenses (including postage, sewing materials, and snack food) submitted by Sophie Goldstein.June 4, 1933
  6-7) Same as Item 5, for March and May 1933. March and May 1933
166-7) Same as Item 5, for March and May 1933. March and May 1933
  8) Receipt from the East Side Vacation Camp Association, naming four girls sent by the school on a trip on August 11, 1933.August 11, 1933
168) Receipt from the East Side Vacation Camp Association, naming four girls sent by the school on a trip on August 11, 1933.August 11, 1933
  9) Bill from East Side Vacation Camp for six girls' trips.August 15, 1933
169) Bill from East Side Vacation Camp for six girls' trips.August 15, 1933
  10) Letter from East Side Vacation Camp asking for the money owed to them.August 24, 1933
1610) Letter from East Side Vacation Camp asking for the money owed to them.August 24, 1933
  11) Letter from East Side Vacation Camp saying that two children did not show up for the trip, thereby depriving others of attending.September 27, 1933
1611) Letter from East Side Vacation Camp saying that two children did not show up for the trip, thereby depriving others of attending.September 27, 1933
  12) Letter to Captain Phillips from the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the U.S.July 11, 1933
  

Enclosing two insurance policies.

1612) Letter to Captain Phillips from the Equitable Life Assurance Society of the U.S.July 11, 1933
  

Enclosing two insurance policies.

 
  13) Letter to Mrs. Phillips from the Welfare Council of NYC.July 6, 1933
  

Asking for a financial statement for 1932.

1613) Letter to Mrs. Phillips from the Welfare Council of NYC.July 6, 1933
  

Asking for a financial statement for 1932.

 
  14) Letter to Mrs. Phillips from aforementioned Council.July 21, 1933
  

Thanking her for sending the 1932 report.

1614) Letter to Mrs. Phillips from aforementioned Council.July 21, 1933
  

Thanking her for sending the 1932 report.

 
  15) Receipt for the Certificate of Incorporation of the Columbia School, as well as the Constitution and By-Laws of the School, signed illegibly.May 23, 1907
1615) Receipt for the Certificate of Incorporation of the Columbia School, as well as the Constitution and By-Laws of the School, signed illegibly.May 23, 1907
  16) Statement by the Board of Managers saying that only the interest may be withdrawn from the account given by Edwin Sternberger.undated
1616) Statement by the Board of Managers saying that only the interest may be withdrawn from the account given by Edwin Sternberger.undated
  17) Receipt for books and papers of the school's treasury, including the treasurer's journal, ledger, check book, etc., by the new Treasurer, Sadge G. Lipskin.June 8, 1944
1617) Receipt for books and papers of the school's treasury, including the treasurer's journal, ledger, check book, etc., by the new Treasurer, Sadge G. Lipskin.June 8, 1944
  18) Emergency Fund balance and account for 1941 and 1942.1941-1942
1618) Emergency Fund balance and account for 1941 and 1942.1941-1942
  19) Same as above, for 1942-1943.1942-1943
1619) Same as above, for 1942-1943.1942-1943
  20) Handwritten account of expenses for 1941, 1942, and 1943.1941-1943
1620) Handwritten account of expenses for 1941, 1942, and 1943.1941-1943
17Correspondence of Mrs. N.T. Phillips1943-1944
  1) Letter from Rosalie S. Phillips to the Board of Managers.February 7, 1944
  

Suggesting a meeting be called to discuss the future of the school, as well as money be collected for the Emergency Fund. In this letter, she also resigns as 1st Vice and Acting President due to her ill health.

BoxFolderTitleDate
171) Letter from Rosalie S. Phillips to the Board of Managers.February 7, 1944
  

Suggesting a meeting be called to discuss the future of the school, as well as money be collected for the Emergency Fund. In this letter, she also resigns as 1st Vice and Acting President due to her ill health.

 
  2) A thank-you note from Phillips to Ms. Rose Kaye for electing her Honorary President of the School.June 8, 1944
172) A thank-you note from Phillips to Ms. Rose Kaye for electing her Honorary President of the School.June 8, 1944
  3) A thank-you note for the aforementioned thank-you note, from Rose Kaye to Rosalie Phillips.June 13, 1944
173) A thank-you note for the aforementioned thank-you note, from Rose Kaye to Rosalie Phillips.June 13, 1944
  4) A thank-you note from Ethel B. Riess, corresponding secretary to Mrs. Phillips, for her "unremitting efforts." February 20, 1944
174) A thank-you note from Ethel B. Riess, corresponding secretary to Mrs. Phillips, for her "unremitting efforts." February 20, 1944
  5) A note from Hannah Stein updating Phillips on current events in the School.June 1, 1944
175) A note from Hannah Stein updating Phillips on current events in the School.June 1, 1944
  6) Notification that Phillips was unanimously elected Honorary President.June 6, 1944
176) Notification that Phillips was unanimously elected Honorary President.June 6, 1944
  7) Letter from Ethel Riess, expressing sadness at Phillips' resignation and wishes for a speedy recovery.February 13, 1944
177) Letter from Ethel Riess, expressing sadness at Phillips' resignation and wishes for a speedy recovery.February 13, 1944
  8) List of expenses by Hannah Stein.January 28, 1943
178) List of expenses by Hannah Stein.January 28, 1943
  9) A postcard from Hannah Stein giving Phillips the latest financial information.November 14, 1943
179) A postcard from Hannah Stein giving Phillips the latest financial information.November 14, 1943
  10) Letter from Isador Stettenheim to Ethel Riess saying that the matter is "at the disposal of President Phillips."November 20, 1943
  

What the "matter" is is not stated.

1710) Letter from Isador Stettenheim to Ethel Riess saying that the matter is "at the disposal of President Phillips."November 20, 1943
  

What the "matter" is is not stated.

 
18Alumnae Club of the Columbia School VignettesJanuary 26, 1941
  1) A copy of a play performed at a pageant held in honor of the 35th anniversary of the Alumnae Club.January 26, 1941
  

The play is entitled "Vignettes from the Life of the Alumnae Club." This particular copy was given as a gift to Mrs. N. Taylor Phillips on her birthday in 1941, as noted in an inscription on the cover of the play. The play consists of seven scenes. It deals with the founding of the school, scenes from the daily life of the school, the marriages of the girls, and other random events. It ends with the Commentator saying to the portraits of Adolphus Solomons and Mrs. Sternberger, "Dear friends, you built a happy little world, unknown and unrenowned, but a happy one… we thank you for this little world you have given us."

BoxFolderTitleDate
181) A copy of a play performed at a pageant held in honor of the 35th anniversary of the Alumnae Club.January 26, 1941
  

The play is entitled "Vignettes from the Life of the Alumnae Club." This particular copy was given as a gift to Mrs. N. Taylor Phillips on her birthday in 1941, as noted in an inscription on the cover of the play. The play consists of seven scenes. It deals with the founding of the school, scenes from the daily life of the school, the marriages of the girls, and other random events. It ends with the Commentator saying to the portraits of Adolphus Solomons and Mrs. Sternberger, "Dear friends, you built a happy little world, unknown and unrenowned, but a happy one… we thank you for this little world you have given us."

 
19Annual Reports1907, 1910-1911
  1) Annual report of the Columbia Religious and Industrial School for Jewish Girls of 1907.1907
  

Includes a list of officers, an annual report of the president detailing the history and services of the school, recent deaths of members of the School, thank-yous to supporters mentioned by name, a list of expenses, a Treasurer's report, and a list of contributors and members.

BoxFolderTitleDate
191) Annual report of the Columbia Religious and Industrial School for Jewish Girls of 1907.1907
  

Includes a list of officers, an annual report of the president detailing the history and services of the school, recent deaths of members of the School, thank-yous to supporters mentioned by name, a list of expenses, a Treasurer's report, and a list of contributors and members.

 
  2) The Columbia School 10th annual report of 1910.1910
  

Includes a list of officers, an Annual Report of the President, and the same items as mentioned in Item 1.

192) The Columbia School 10th annual report of 1910.1910
  

Includes a list of officers, an Annual Report of the President, and the same items as mentioned in Item 1.

 
  3) The Columbia School 11th Annual Report of 1911.1911
  

Including the same types of reports as the other two annual reports.

193) The Columbia School 11th Annual Report of 1911.1911
  

Including the same types of reports as the other two annual reports.

 
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