Guide to the Rachel Wischnitzer Collection
undated, 1894-1991
(bulk 1940-1989)

AR 25657

Processed by Sarah Glover

Leo Baeck Institute

Center for Jewish History

15 West 16th Street

New York, N.Y. 10011

Phone: (212) 744-6400

Fax: (212) 988-1305

Email: http://www.lbi.org/ask

URL: http://www.lbi.org

© 2016  Leo Baeck Institute
Electronic finding aid was encoded in EAD 2002 by Sarah Glover in April 2016. Description is in English.
June 2018: Links to digital objects added in Container List.

Descriptive Summary

Creator: Wischnitzer, Rachel, 1885-1989
Title: Rachel Wischnitzer Collection
Dates:undated, 1894-1991
Dates:bulk 1940-1989
Abstract: The Rachel Wischnitzer Collection contains correspondence, lecture notes, photographs, lantern slides, and negatives documenting Rachel Wischnitzer’s career as an art historian, curator, professor, consultant, and author. Also included are correspondence, records, and photographs pertaining to her husband Mark Wischnitzer’s work as a historian, editor, and Secretary General of the Hilfsverein der Deutschen Juden.
Languages: The collection is in English, German, French, and Russian, with smaller amounts of Hebrew and Yiddish, and a handful of items in Italian, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, and Latin.
Quantity: 11 linear feet + one oversize folder
Identification: AR 25657
Repository: Leo Baeck Institute
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Biographical Note

Rachel Wischnitzer née Bernstein was born in Minsk, Russia, on April 15, 1885, to Wladimir Bernstein and Sophie Bernstein née Halpern. Upon her graduation from Gymnasium in Warsaw in 1902, she studied at the University of Heidelberg (1902-1903), Académie Royale des Beaux-Arts in Brussels (1903-1905), and the École Spéciale d'Architecture in Paris (1905-1907), from which she received her diploma in architecture. She continued her education with courses in art history at the University of Munich (1909-1910). Returning to Russia, she worked on the staff of the Evreiskaia Entsiklopediia (Russian-language Jewish Encyclopedia), to which she contributed articles on architecture, artists, and ceremonial objects, as well as reviewing art publications for the magazine Russkaya Mysl.

On June 5, 1912, Rachel Bernstein married Mark Wischnitzer, who served as one of the editors of the Russian Jewish Encyclopedia. Mark Wischnitzer (also Markus Wischnitzer and Mordko Wisznicer) was born in Rovno, Russia, on May 10, 1882. His parents were Jakob Lejba (also Jakob Leib and Leon) Wischnitzer and Fajga (Fanny) Wischnitzer née Kulikovitzer (Kulikowiczer). He attended the K.K. Kronprinz-Rudolf-Gymnasium in Brody from 1894 till 1901, then continued his studies at the University of Vienna and Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität in Berlin, from which he received his doctorate in 1906.

Mark Wischnitzer served in the Austrian Army during World War I, during which time Rachel Wischnitzer lived in Vienna and Berlin. After the war, the couple lived for a year in London, where Mark was pursuing research. Rachel studied Hebrew illuminated manuscripts at the British Museum and Bodleian Library, as well as contributed articles to The Christian Science Monitor. From London, the Wischnitzers moved to Berlin, where Mark Wischnitzer became Secretary General of the Hilfsverein der Deutschen Juden, in 1921.

While in Berlin, the Wischnitzers launched the companion art journals Rimon (Hebrew) and Milgroim (Yiddish). The journals were published from 1922 through 1924, with Rachel serving as art editor and Mark serving as managing editor. Rachel also worked as art editor of the Encyclopedia Judaica published in Berlin from 1928 through 1934, and as curator of the Berlin Jewish community’s museum from 1933 through 1938. The Wischnitzers' only child, Leonard James Wischnitzer (later Winchester), was born in Berlin on January 5, 1924.

The family immigrated to Paris in 1938; Rachel Wischnitzer and Leonard continued on to the United States in 1940, with Mark Wischnitzer following a year later. Rachel Wischnitzer returned to school, earning her master’s degree from New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts in 1944. Her master’s thesis, entitled The Messianic Theme in the Paintings of the Dura Synagogue, was published in 1948. Her other major works include Synagogue Architecture in the United States (1955) and Architecture of the European Synagogue (1964). Rachel Wischnitzer taught fine arts at Yeshiva University’s Stern College for Women from 1956 until her retirement in 1968.

Mark Wischnitzer died October 15, 1955, in Tel Aviv, Israel. Rachel Wischnitzer died November 20, 1989, in New York.

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Scope and Content Note

This collection contains paper-based and visual materials primarily recording the professional life of art historian Rachel Wischnitzer and her husband historian Mark Wischnitzer, as well as their education and immigration to the United States.

Series I focuses on Rachel Wischnitzer’s work as a curator, museum consultant, lecturer, and professor, as well as her research and publications. The paper-based materials, with the exception of one folder found in Subseries 2, cover the time after Rachel Wischnitzer’s immigration to the United States from Germany via France in 1940. The majority of this material is correspondence with other individuals in her field, museums with which she worked, her publishers, and various libraries and archives. Subseries 3 pertains to her work as a professor of fine arts at Yeshiva University’s Stern College for women, and contains correspondence, lecture notes, syllabi, course descriptions, and slide lists. Also included in this series is a large amount of visual material—photographs, lantern slides, and negatives—compiled by Rachel Wischnitzer and used as reference materials, illustrations for her publications, and as visual aids for her lectures. Common topics include synagogues, book plates and illuminated manuscript pages, ceremonial and liturgical objects, and art.

Documents pertaining to Mark Wischnitzer’s professional activities, particularly his role as Secretary General of the Hilfsverein der Deutschen Juden and work as editor of several publications, can be found in Series 2. Professional correspondence in this series covers his work as editor and discussion of books and articles he wrote. The series also includes a photograph album with photographs of Hilfsverein representatives, as well as a folder of letters and telegraphs Mark Wischnitzer received on the occasion of his 50th birthday in 1932, while he was Secretary General of the Hilfsverein. Personal records in this series include records of Mark Wischnitzer’s education at the Gymnasium in Brody and universities in Vienna and Berlin, as well as official documents testifying his service during World War I, years of work for the Hilfsverein, certificates confirming different versions of his name, and marriage certificate, as well as a folder of correspondence pertaining to his efforts to emigrate from France to the United States in 1940.

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Arrangement

Materials in the collection arrived at the Leo Baeck Institute in labeled folders. Each folder was labeled "RW" for Rachel Wischnitzer or "MW" for Mark Wischnitzer; the collection was then divided into two series accordingly. Due to the small amount of material pertaining to Mark Wischnitzer present in the collection, Series 2 was not further divided into subseries. Rachel Wischnitzer's correspondence was filed in labeled folders by individual or subject; this separation has been maintained. For items found in Series I, Subseries 1-4, folder contents have been kept together and folder titles maintained. Glass plate negatives and lantern slides found in the collection came to the Institute lacking an original order. Glass plate negatives have been sorted by size; lantern slides are organized topically.

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Access and Use

Access Restrictions

This collection is open to researchers.

Access Information

Collection is digitized. Follow the links in the Container List to access the digitized materials.

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Access Points

Click on a subject to search that term in the Center's catalog. Return to the Top of Page

Related Material

Correspondence between Rachel Wischnitzer and Clara Brahm is held by the New York Public Library's Manuscripts and Archives Division. The YIVO Institute for Jewish Research holds the papers of Mark Wischnitzer.

The American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute, Yeshiva University Museum, and YIVO Institute for Jewish Research hold a variety of books and articles by and about Rachel and Mark Wischnitzer, including their art journals Rimon and Milgroim.

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Separated Material

One box of publications (books, serials, and offprints), including the Wischnitzers' art journals Rimon and Milgroim, were removed to the LBI Library. One box of woodcut blocks and one box of awards and personal effects were removed to the LBI Art Department.

Two folders of student papers and a folder containing maps of Belarus, Israel, Italy (Rome and Venice), and New York City were removed from the collection and discarded.

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Preferred Citation

Published citations should take the following form:

Identification of item, date (if known); Rachel Wischnitzer Collection; AR 25657; box number; folder number; Leo Baeck Institute.

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Processing Information

Upon receipt of the collection, LBI staff transferred the collection material from the boxes in which it arrived into archival boxes. During processing, paper materials were transferred from the original folders into archival folders; folder contents were kept intact and folder titles retained. Lantern slides and glass plate negatives were placed into envelopes and four-flap enclosures, respectively, and housed in appropriate storage boxes.

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Container List

The following section contains a detailed listing of the materials in the collection.
Follow the links to access the digitized materials.

 

Series I: Rachel Wischnitzer, undated, 1910s-1991

In English, German, French, Russian, Hebrew, Yiddish, Italian, and Spanish.
Boxes 1-9, 11-30. 10.5 linear feet.
Arrangement:

Topical

Scope and Content:

This series documents the professional activities of art historian Rachel Wischnitzer, including her research and publications, work as a curator and museum consultant, service on editorial and museum boards, lectures she gave, and her tenure as a professor of fine arts at Yeshiva University’s Stern College for Women.

Correspondence, which comprises the bulk of the paper-based materials in this series, covers all of these areas of Wischnitzer’s career. Much of the correspondence focuses on her research and the publication of her books and articles, including both proposals for publications that she submitted and solicitations she received to write articles and book chapters, discussion of obtaining illustrations and permission to publish them, and letters concerning proofs and editing. Notes, research photocopies, and article drafts can be found with the correspondence. Also included are letters Wischnitzer wrote to scholars, libraries and archives, rabbis and congregations, and architects with questions on topics of Jewish art and architecture, along with the responses. Researchers also reached out to her with their questions on the same topics. Other subjects covered in the correspondence are Rachel Wischnitzer’s work with various Jewish museums, particularly the Jewish Museum and Yeshiva University Museum, invitations for her to give lectures, and various editorial and museum boards on which she served. The series also contains correspondence, lecture notes, syllabi, course descriptions, and slide lists from her tenure at Stern College for Women.

Also included in this series is a large amount of visual material—photographs, lantern slides, and negatives—compiled by Rachel Wischnitzer and used as reference materials, illustrations for her publications, and as visual aids for her lectures. Common topics include synagogues, book plates and illuminated manuscript pages, ceremonial and liturgical objects, and art.

Subseries 1: Correspondence (Individuals), undated, 1938-1989

In English, German, French, and Russian.
Box 1. 0.5 linear feet.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains correspondence between Rachel Wischnitzer and other individuals in her field, including historians, artists, art historians, museum professionals, scholars, and rabbis. The correspondence deals almost exclusively with her professional activities, particularly her publications and research. It includes solicitations for Wischnitzer to write various articles and book chapters, critiques of papers submitted for publication, discussion of obtaining illustrations and permission to publish them, and letters concerning proofs and editing. Some copies of article drafts are included with the correspondence. Correspondence regarding her research includes proposals of project she submitted for financing, reports on her research progress, and questions she posed to other scholars on Jewish art and architecture topics, along with their responses. Researchers also reached out to her for help with their work, such as questions on topics of Jewish art and museum objects, requesting the use of materials from her collection of slides and photographs, and asking for copies of her publications. The subseries additionally contains invitations for Wischnitzer to give lectures and correspondence regarding various editorial and museum boards on which she served.

Additional correspondence from some individuals in this series can be found throughout correspondence in Subseries 2.

BoxFolderTitleDate
11Badt-Strauss, Bertha1947-1948
12Baron, Salo W.1940-1965
13Chagall, Ida1959
14Chagall, Marc1959-1960
15Cook, Walter W. S.undated
16Davidowitz, Moshe (Spertus Museum)1958-1971
17Davidson, Eric1956
18Du Mensil du Buisson, Robert1940-1968
19Eisler, Colin1986
110Finkel, Joshua1951-1969
111Gaster, Theodor H.1943-1946
112Geller, Todros1943-1949
113Goodenough, Erwin R.1940-1961
114Gross, William L.1965-1980
115Grossman, Cissy1975-1988
116Gutmann, Joseph1952-1981
117Helfer, Judith1972-1986
118Ivor, Ruth1964-1989
119Kahler, Erich1944
120Kraeling, Carl H.1940-1947
121Lancaster, Clay1957
122Landsberger, Franz1941-1964
123Namenyi, Ernest1946-1958
124Narkiss, Bezalel1965-1987
125Narkiss, Mordechai1954-1959
126Pfeiffer, Robert H.1947
127Raisin, Max1940-1949
128Rostovtzeff, M. I.1942-1946
129Roth, Cecil1946-1966
130Roth, Ernst1966-1971
131Schapiro, Meyer1948-1986
132Schoenberger, Guido1944-1970
133Sherman, Claire Richter1977-1983
134Sobel, Sam (American Jewish Museum of Art and Culture)1968-1970
135Treves, Marco1965-1981
136Weill, Julien1938
137Weinstein, Rochelle1971-1988
138Weiss, Abraham1970
139Yochelson, Kathryn1949-1983

Subseries 2: Correspondence (Subject), 1922-1991

In English, German, French, Russian, Hebrew, Yiddish, Italian, and Spanish.
Boxes 2-6. 2.5 linear feet.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical

Scope and Content:

As in Subseries 1, correspondence in this subseries deals almost entirely with Rachel Wischnitzer’s professional activities, particularly the research for and publication of her books and articles. Multiple folders in this subseries contain correspondence on her major works, Synagogue Architecture in the United States and Architecture of the European Synagogue; correspondence with her publisher, the Jewish Publication Society, also covers these publications. The correspondence includes her book proposals, referees’ critiques, updates on her progress, and discussion of edits and revisions. Returned questionnaires that the Jewish Publication Society sent out to synagogues across the United States are included with the correspondence, as is correspondence between Wischnitzer and various rabbis, congregations, and architects to whom she wrote requesting photographs of and information about their synagogues. Similar correspondence is also included as part of her research on European synagogues, as is correspondence between Wischnitzer and various archives and libraries in Europe.

Correspondence regarding articles Wischnitzer published is also contained in this subseries. Included are solicitations for her to contribute articles and book chapters, letters regarding papers she submitted for publication, contract negotiations, discussion of illustrations and permissions to publish them, research questions addressed to scholars as well as libraries and archives, and discussion of edits and revisions. Notes, research photocopies, and drafts of the articles can be found with the correspondence.

The other significant professional activity covered by correspondence in this series is Rachel Wischnitzer’s consulting for Jewish art museums, particularly the Jewish Museum and Yeshiva University Museum. Wischnitzer consulted for Yeshiva University Museum in the years leading up to the museum’s founding, and the correspondence includes extensive discussion of the synagogue models commissioned by the museum, along with meeting minutes and scripts she wrote for museum exhibits. Correspondence pertaining to the Jewish Museum covers proposals for exhibits and programs, items the Jewish Museum borrowed from her for exhibit, committee meetings, and research for and drafts of contributions to a book published by the museum.

Of particular note in the subseries is Box 4, Folder 4, which contains all of the paper material present in the collection documenting Rachel Wischnitzer’s life in Berlin, Germany, during the interwar years. During this time, Wischnitzer served as an art editor for various Jewish publications and as a museum curator for the Jewish community in Berlin, and her activities in these areas are reflected in the correspondence. Included in the folder are letters from individuals such as Meir Dizengoff, Ismar Elbogen, Moses Gaster, Adolph Goldschmidt, Rudolf Hallo, Salli Kirschstein, Franz Landsberger, Sigmund Seeligmann, Hermann Struck, Eleazar Sukenik, and Elias Tcherikower.

BoxFolderTitleDate
2130th Anniversary Rimon/Milgroim1953
22100th Birthday1985
23American Oriental Society1956-1982
24Architecture of the European Synagogue1947-1959
25Architecture of the European Synagogue1960-1966
26Architecture of the European Synagogue — Amsterdam1949-1960
27Architecture of the European Synagogue — England1957-1965
28Architecture of the European Synagogue — Italy1956-1962
29Biographical directories1955-1966
210Brit Ivrit Olamit1969-1972
211Claims Conference1954-1959
212"The 'Closed Temple' Panel in the Synagogue of Dura-Europos"1969-1972
213"The First Year"1940
BoxFolderTitleDate
31Friends of Rachel Wischnitzer Committee1984-1991
32Gazette des Beaux-Arts1942-1967
33Heawar (Mark Wischnitzer bibliography)1967-1974
34"Jacopo Pontormo's Joseph Scenes"1947-1953
35The Jewish Museum1947-1978
36Jewish Publication Society (Solomon Grayzel)1941-1959
37Jewish Publication Society (Solomon Grayzel)1960-1966
38Lectures1940-1976
39"Maimonides' Drawings of the Temple"1958-1977
310Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture1965-1982
311The Messianic Theme in the Paintings of the Dura Synagogue1944-1949
BoxFolderTitleDate
41Minhagim1946-1984
42New York University1944-1952
43"Picasso's Guernica"1971-1986
44Professional correspondence1922-1939
45Professional correspondence1941-1944
46Professional correspondence1945-1947
47Professional correspondence1948-1949
BoxFolderTitleDate
51Professional correspondence1950-1954
52Professional correspondence1955-1959
53Professional correspondence1960-1964
54Professional correspondence1965-1969
55Professional correspondence1970-1974
56Professional correspondence1975-1979
57Professional correspondence1980-1989
BoxFolderTitleDate
61Raphael Mahler Festschrift1968-1974
62"Some Aspects of Jewish Art in Europe before 1939"1943-1945
63Synagogue Architecture in the United States1946-1949
64Synagogue Architecture in the United States1950-1953
65Synagogue Architecture in the United States1954
66Synagogue Architecture in the United States1955-1957
67Universal Jewish Encyclopedia1957
68"The Workings of Folk Art"1965
69Yeshiva University Museum1970-1972
610Yeshiva University Museum1973
611Yeshiva University Museum1974-1978
612YIVO Open Course1944-1945

Subseries 3: Stern College for Women, undated, 1956-1984

In English.
Box 7. 0.5 linear feet.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains materials from Rachel Wischnitzer’s tenure at Yeshiva University’s Stern College for Women, where she taught fine arts from 1956 to 1968. The majority of the subseries is comprised of lecture notes for courses she taught during that time, along with homework and test questions, copies of exams, and lists of slides. Syllabi and course descriptions can also be found in this subseries.

A small quantity of correspondence is present in the subseries, mostly regarding her teaching schedule and salary, as well as the honorary doctorate granted her by the university in 1968. A final folder contains items pertaining to a symposium on the paintings of the Dura synagogue, which she organized shortly after her retirement.

BoxFolderTitleDate
71Correspondence1962-1984
72Electives1957-1959
73Exhibitions1968
74Lecture notes1956-1957
75Lecture notes1958-1959
76Lecture notes1960-1963
77Lecture notes1964-1968
78Notebooksundated
79Slide inventories1967
710Syllabi1961-1967
711Symposium on the Synagogue of Dura-Europos1968

Subseries 4: Photographs, undated, circa 1930-1985

In English, German, French, and Russian.
Boxes 7-9. 1 linear foot.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical

Scope and Content:

This subseries includes photographs and reproductions, many of book plates, compiled by Rachel Wischnitzer in the course of her research and used for reference and as illustrations in various publications. The only exception is the first folder in the subseries, which contains photographs taken during a celebration held at Stern College on the occasion of Rachel Wischnitzer’s 100th birthday.

Along with the photographs and reproductions, some folders include notes on the topic, clippings, explanatory letters, and article drafts. Box 9, Folder 15 contains photographs of synagogues she loaned to the Rose Art Museum for the exhibit “Two Hundred Years of American Synagogue Architecture,” along with related correspondence and loan agreements.

Restrictions:

The bulk of this subseries is not digitized due to copyright.

BoxFolderTitleDate
712100th Birthday1985
713Chagall reproductionsundated
714Collection of Jewish Silver (Album of Runa Reitmann) (1 of 3)circa 1930
BoxFolderTitleDate
81Collection of Jewish Silver (Album of Runa Reitmann) (2 of 3)circa 1930
82Collection of Jewish Silver (Album of Runa Reitmann) (3 of 3)circa 1930
83Dura synagogueundated
84European synagogues — Amsterdamundated
85European synagogues — Curacaoundated
86European synagogues — Cyprusundated
87European synagogues — Czechoslovakia and Hungaryundated
88European synagogues — Englandundated
Box TitleDate
OS 170 European synagogues — Englandundated
BoxFolderTitleDate
89European synagogues — Franceundated
810European synagogues — Germanyundated
Box TitleDate
OS 170 European synagogues — Germanyundated
BoxFolderTitleDate
811European synagogues — Italyundated
BoxFolderTitleDate
91European synagogues — Poland and Russiaundated
92European synagogues — Spain and Portugalundated
93European synagogues — Toledo, Spainundated
94Funeral artundated
95Guernica (Picasso)undated
96Hanukkah lampsundated
97Illuminated manuscriptsundated
98The Illustrated London News1933
99Kennicott Bibleundated
910Lipmann Heller, Zurat ha-Bayit (1602)undated
911Maimonides, Bodleian Pococke 295undated
Box TitleDate
OS 170 Maimonides, Bodleian Pococke 295undated
BoxFolderTitleDate
912Maimonides plansundated
Box TitleDate
OS 170 Maimonides plansundated
BoxFolderTitleDate
913Memento moriundated
914Mérode Altarpieceundated
Box TitleDate
OS 170 Orient, Mosqueundated
OS 170 Polyglot Bible (1657)undated
BoxFolderTitleDate
915Rose Art Museum exhibit (Two Hundred Years of American Synagogue Architecture)undated, 1976
916Scrapbook — Artifacts and descriptionsundated
Box TitleDate
OS 170 Ugolino, Montanoundated
BoxFolderTitleDate
917Unidentified synagoguesundated
918United States synagoguesundated
919Virginal (harpsichord)undated, 1956
920Zodiacundated

Subseries 5: Lantern Slides and Negatives, undated, 1910s-circa 1968

In English, German, French, and Russian.
Boxes 11-30. 6 linear feet.
Arrangement:

Negatives arranged by size. Lantern slides arranged by topic.

Scope and Content:

As with the photographs in Subseries 4, Rachel Wischnitzer compiled the slides and negatives in this subseries during her research and used them not only for reference and as illustrations in publications, but also to illustrate her many lectures.

To ensure safe storage, glass plate negatives in this subseries are sorted and stored by size. The negatives are unlabeled; the vast majority of the images are of book plates and illuminated manuscript pages. In contrast, the lantern sides are approximately the same size (3.25” x 4”) and are labeled; they are sorted by topic. Common topics include synagogues, book plates and illuminated manuscript pages, ceremonial and liturgical objects, and art.

Restrictions:

This subseries has not been microfilmed or digitized due to the format of the material.

BoxFolderTitleDate
111Cardboard lid found with slidesundated
Box TitleDate
12 Glass plate negatives (1.75" x 2.25")1910s-1930s
Box TitleDate
13 Glass plate negatives (2.5" x 3.5")1910s-1930s
Box TitleDate
14 Glass plate negatives (3.5" x 5")1910s-1930s
Box TitleDate
15 Glass plate negatives (3.5" x 5")1910s-1930s
Box TitleDate
16 Glass plate negatives (5" x 7", 7" x 9.5")1910s-1930s
Box TitleDate
17 Lantern slides1910s-1930s
  

Western European synagogues, German synagogues

 
Box TitleDate
18 Lantern Slides1910s-1930s
  

Eastern European synagogues, United States synagogues

 
Box TitleDate
19 Lantern slides1910s-1930s
  

United States synagogues, Dura synagogue

 
Box TitleDate
20 Lantern slides1910s-1930s
  

Dura synagogue

 
Box TitleDate
21 Lantern slides1910s-1930s
  

Ancient synagogues, Haggadot

 
Box TitleDate
22 Lantern slides1910s-1930s
  

Haggadot

 
Box TitleDate
23 Lantern slides1910s-1930s
  

Torah ornaments, ceremonial objects

 
Box TitleDate
24 Lantern slides1910s-1930s
  

Machzorim, Megillot, Pentateuch, Kennicott Bible

 
Box TitleDate
25 Lantern slides1910s-1930s
  

Matthaeus Merian, Johannes Leusden, Sefer Minhagim, Sefirat HaOmer, Bible (Book of Ezekiel), Mishneh Torah, Mishnah Middot, Ketubot

 
Box TitleDate
26 Lantern slides1910s-1930s
  

Modern art, Christian art

 
Box TitleDate
27 Lantern slides1910s-1930s
  

Catacombs, Sarcophagi, Gravestones, Elkan Adler manuscripts, Bibliotheque Nationale, Russian-language titles

 
Box TitleDate
28 Lantern slides1910s-1930s
  

Miscellaneous

 
Box TitleDate
29 Lantern slides1910s-1930s
  

Miscellaneous

 
BoxFolderTitleDate
112Negatives (4" x 5") (1 of 2)undated
113Negatives (4" x 5") (2 of 2)undated
114Negatives (5" x 7")undated
Box TitleDate
30 Negatives (Rolls)undated
BoxFolderTitleDate
115Slides (2" x 2")[1956-1968]
  

Stern slides

 
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Series II: Mark Wischnitzer, undated, 1894-1969

In German, Russian, Hebrew, English, Yiddish, French, Polish, Finnish, and Latin.
Box 10. 0.5 linear feet.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical

Scope and Content:

This series focuses primarily on Mark Wischnitzer’s professional activities, particularly his role as Secretary General of the Hilfsverein der Deutschen Juden and work as editor of several publications, including the Encyclopedia Judaica published in Berlin and the companion art journals Rimon (Hebrew) and Milgroim (Yiddish), which he co-edited with his wife Rachel Wischnitzer. Professional correspondence found in this series includes letters regarding publications he edited, including letters from contributors. The correspondence also includes discussion of articles and books written by Mark Wischnitzer. Correspondents found in the folders of professional correspondence include Majer Bałaban, Max Bienenstock, Solomon Birnbaum, Leon Bramson, Martin Buber, Ben-Zion Dinur, Aron Freimann, Israel Halpern, Julius Hessen, Max J. Kohler, Sigmund Seeligmann, Zalman Shazar, David Simonsen, Max Soloveitchik, Bernhard Wachstein, and Max Weinreich.

One folder in this series is entirely comprised of letters and telegrams Mark Wischnitzer received on the occasion of his 50th birthday in 1932. Due to his position in the Hilfsverein, he received congratulations from representatives of many of the major Jewish organizations in Germany, including the American Joint Distribution Committee, B’nai B’rith, Encyclopedia Judaica, Hilfsverein der Deutschen Juden, Jüdischer Frauenbund, and YIVO. Many letters from individuals on the occasion of his birthday are present as well, such as Leo Baerwald, Julius Blau, Willy Dreyfus, Simon Dubnow, Ismar Elbogen, Wilfrid Israel, Simon Rawidowicz, and Sigmund Wassermann. A photograph album found in this series includes photographs of representatives of the Hilfsverein, including Mark Wischnitzer.

The series also includes one folder of personal correspondence, mostly between Mark Wischnitzer and his sister Sala Wischnitzer Gerber in Israel, as well as a folder of correspondence pertaining to his efforts to emigrate from France in 1940. This folder is comprised of letters from Rachel Wischnitzer, who had already immigrated to the United States with their son Leonard, to various government entities, lawyers, and representatives of the American Joint Distribution Committee trying to arrange for the necessary affidavits and visas.

Also found in this series are records of Mark Wischnitzer’s education at the Gymnasium in Brody and universities in Vienna and Berlin, as well as official documents testifying his service during World War I, years of work for the Hilfsverein, certificates confirming different versions of his name, and marriage certificate.

BoxFolderTitleDate
101Correspondence — 50th Birthday1932
102Correspondence — Family correspondence1942-1952
103Correspondence — Mark Wischnitzer immigration1939-1941
104Correspondence — Professional correspondence1914-1939
105Correspondence — Professional correspondence1940-1955
106Correspondence — Union of Russian Jews1950
107Educational records1894-1906
108Official documents1921-1969
109Photographs — Hilfsverein der deutschen Judenundated
1010Possibilities of Land Settlement in Oversea Countries1938
1011Recipe bookundated
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