Guide to the Esriel Hildesheimer Collection, 1821-1920

AR 2373 / MF 726 / MF 248

Processed by LBI Staff

Leo Baeck Institute

Center for Jewish History

15 West 16th Street

New York, N.Y. 10011

Phone: (212) 744-6400

Fax: (212) 988-1305

Email: http://www.lbi.org/ask

URL: http://www.lbi.org

© 2010 Leo Back Institute, New York. All rights reserved.
Center for Jewish History, Publisher.
Finding aid was encoded in EAD 2002 by Chris Bentley on April 1, 2010. Description is in English.
February 06, 2013  Links to digital objects added in Container List.

Creator:Hildesheimer, Esriel, 1820-1899
Title:Esriel Hildesheimer Collection
Dates:1821-1920
Abstract:The bulk of the collection consists of letters to Esriel Hildesheimer\ and others from various individuals, mostly rabbis in Germany, Austria-Hungary, Palestine, Eastern Europe, and the United States, and institutions, including Akiba Lehren, David Neimann, Simcha Bunem Sofer, Yeshiva Etz-Hayyim, Adolf Jellinek, and the Oesterreichisch- Ungarisch- Israelitische Gemeinde, Jerusalem. Approximately one-half of the correspondence is transcribed.
Languages:This collection is in Hebrew and German.
Quantity:0.25 linear feet
Identification:AR 2373 / MF 726 / MF 248
Repository: Leo Baeck Institute Archives
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Biographical Note

Born in Halberstadt in 1820, Esriel Hildesheimer studied at the yeshiva in Altona and at the universities of Berlin and Halle, receiving his doctorate in 1844. Along with Samson Raphael Hirsch, he was one of the founders and leaders of neo-Orthodoxy. He became rabbi in Eisenstadt, Austria-Hungary, in 1851, where he also founded a yeshiva, and at Congregation Adass Jisroel, Berlin, in 1869, founding the Rabbiner Seminar fuer das orthodoxe Judentum in 1873. His attempts to give secular learning a firm place in rabbinical studies brought him into conflict with more traditionally minded Orthodox Jews. He died in Berlin in 1899.

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Scope and Content Note

The bulk of the collection consists of letters to Esriel Hildesheimer\ and others from various individuals, mostly rabbis in Germany, Austria-Hungary, Palestine, Eastern Europe, and the United States, and institutions, including Akiba Lehren, David Neimann, Simcha Bunem Sofer, Yeshiva Etz-Hayyim, Adolf Jellinek, and the Oesterreichisch- Ungarisch- Israelitische Gemeinde, Jerusalem. Approximately one-half of the correspondence is transcribed.

In addition there are various business records and other Hebrew documents of the Local-Comitee der israelitischen Armen- und Pilgerwohnungen auf Zion and other institutions in Jerusalem and a responsum from the eighteenth century.

Printed materials include two appeals from 1920 related to the Israel Hildesheimer Jubilaeums Spende (donation on the occasion of his 100th anniversary) and an undated circular by Esriel Hildesheimer asking for help for the Jews of Baghdad during an outbreak of cholera.

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Arrangement

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Access and Use

Access Information

Collection is digitized. Follow the links in the Container List to access the digitized materials.

Use Restrictions

There may be some restrictions on the use of the collection. For more information, contact:
Leo Baeck Institute, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY 10011
email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org

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Access Points

This collection is indexed under the following headings in the online catalog. Researchers desiring materials about related topics, persons, or places should search the catalog using these headings.

Click on a subject to search that term in the Center's catalog. Return to the Top of Page

Separated Material

Photographs have been removed to the LBI Photograph Collection.

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Microfilm

The collection is available on microfilm (MF 726).

The letters to Hildesheimer are available on microfilm (MF 248).

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Preferred Citation

Published citations should take the following form:

Identification of item, date (if known); Esriel Hildesheimer Collection; AR 2373; box number; folder number; Leo Baeck Institute.

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Other Finding Aid

3-page inventory; 3 catalog cards.

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Container List

The following section contains a detailed listing of the materials in the collection.

Follow the links to access the digitized materials.

 

Series I: Correspondence

A) To Esriel Hildesheimer

BoxFolderTitleDate
11Abraham, son of Kalonimos, Nuremberg1893
12Benjamin, Rosia, Jerusalem1870
13Cohen, Abraham, USAundated
14Cohn, Abraham Ber, Berlin1870
15Etz-Hozzim, Yeshiva, Jerusalem1870
16Freund, Tobias, Jerusalem1876
17Friedland, Nathan, Jerusalem1873 or 1883
18Hausdorf, Asriel Selig, Jerusalem1870
19Heizler, Joseph, Tiberias1851
110City of Kaskp, Hungary1894
111Lehren, Akiba, Amsterdam1872-1875
112Liefschitz, Israel, Bjalistokundated
113Meir, Bezalel, Regensburg1894
114Meyer, M., Beuthen1888
115Moriles, Menahem M., Rabbi, Ropezyeeundated
116Neimann, David, Rabbi, Pressburg1866, 1893
117Polotzki, Wolf Zundated
118Robinowitz, Raphael Note, Munich1864
119Rohs, Jacob ben Abraham, Amsterdam1871
120Shimshen, Tenin, Rabbi, Berlad (Romania)1895
121Silbermann, Eliezer Lipman1872
122Sofer, Simcha Bunem, Rabbi, Pressburgundated
123Strashun, D.O., Vilna1888
124Trevish, Hillel David, Rabbi, Wilki (Lithuania)1894
125Trisan, Hillel, Rabbi, Starodub (Russia)1888
126Unidentified, undated1821, 1876-1877

B) To others

BoxFolderTitleDate
127Herzfeld, J.Bundated
128Hirsch, (to Dr. Baer in Dresden)1849
129Jellinek, Adolf, Leipzig1851
130Joel, (to Aaron Steker)1878
131Levy, M. Gottschalk, Kissing, (to Dr. Lehmann)1872
132Neve-Schalom, Jerusalem, (to M.G. Hirsch), undated1879-1880
133Oestereich-Ungarn Israelitische Gemeinde, Jerusalem1893
134Sachs, Senior1850-1855
135Unidentified, (to Rabbi Hirschlaub in Munich)1850
136Unidentified, undated
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Series II: Documents

BoxFolderTitleDate
137Various1877-1883
138Photograph; removed to photo fileundated
139Printed Materialsundated, 1920
140Responsumundated, 18th century
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