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Guide to the Papers of the Mosse Family,
1676-2001 (bulk 1828-1982)
AR 25184

Processed by Stanislav Pejša

Leo Baeck Institute

Center for Jewish History

15 West 16th Street

New York, NY 10011


Phone: (212) 744-6400

Fax: (212) 988-1305

Email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org


URL: http://www.lbi.org

© 2004 Leo Baeck Institute at the Center for Jewish History. All rights reserved.
Center for Jewish History, Publisher.
Machine-readable finding aid was created by Stanislav Pejša as Microsoft Word in May through June 2004. Electronic finding aid was converted to EAD 2002 by Stanislav Pejša in June 2004. Description is in English.
March 2005. Access points added by Dianne Ritchey Oummia.

Descriptive Summary

Creators: Hilde Lachmann-Mosse, Hans Lachmann-Mosse, Albert Mosse, and Marcus Mosse
Title: Mosse Family Collection
Dates: 1676-2001
Dates: bulk 1828-1982
Abstract: The Mosse Family Collection documents the social and economic upward mobility of the Jewish family in Germany. Personal papers of Marcus Mosse, a physician in Grätz (then the Grand-Duchy of Posen, now Grodzisk Wielkopolski, Poland), his sons Alfred Mosse, a lawyer, and Rudolf Mosse, a publisher and owner of the Berliner Tageblatt, Hans Lachmann-Mosse and his wife Felicia Mosse, and their daughter Hilde Lachmann-Mosse, a pediatrician and child psychiatrist, comprise the core of the collection. Other members of the family are also represented. The collection also contains records of the advertising agency Annoncen-Expedition Rudolf Mosse, mostly originating from its Zürich office in Switzerland. These records show the efforts of preservation of some of the family and company assets in secure places after the NSDAP take-over in Germany in 1933. The collection consists mainly of correspondence, personal items, newspaper clippings, photographs, and audio tapes.
Languages: The collection is in German, English, Polish, Japanese, and several documents are in Latin and classic Greek.
Quantity: 8 linear feet
Identification: AR 25184
Repository: Leo Baeck Institute at the Center for Jewish History
Note:

Old call numbers AR 99, AR 3375, AR 3376, AR 3377, AR 203, AR 306, AR 3535, AR 3271, MF 331, MF 332, MF 116

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Biographical Notes

Mosse, Albert

portrait of Albert Mosse (1846-1925)
Albert Mosse
(1846-1925)

Albert Mosse was born on October 1, 1846 in Grätz (then the Grand-Duchy of Posen, now Grodzisk Wielkopolski, Poland) to Marcus Mosse and Ulrike Mosse (neé Wolff). Having graduated from the grammar school in Lissa (then Germany, now Leszno, Poland) and Guben (Germany), Albert Mosse studied law at the University of Berlin in 1865 thanks to the financial support of his older brothers Salomon and Theodor. He finished his studies in 1868 and entered the ranks of the Prussian state administration. During the Franco-Prussian war 1870/1871 Albert Mosse volunteered for the Prussian army.

After working in several court offices on various levels Albert Mosse became a judge of the county court (Kreisgericht) in Spandau, Germany in 1876. Eventually, he was appointed judge of the state court (Landrichter, Landgerichtsrat), which was the highest position an unbaptized Jew could achieve at that time.

While serving as a judge in Berlin, he held lectures on public law for Japanese lawyers and diplomats. When the Japanese government decided to modernize Japan's legal system after the Prussian-German model, Albert Mosse was a natural choice for a legal expert due to his contacts with the Japanese embassy. He signed a three-year contract and together with his family left Germany for Japan in 1886. Albert Mosse participated in preparatory work for the new Japanese constitution and worked on other important legal drafts, international agreements, and contracts. The law on local self-government from 1888 was among the most significant of these. After the new Japanese constitution was enacted in 1889, Albert Mosse returned to Germany.

He was appointed state supreme court judge in Königsberg (then East Prussia, now Kaliningrad, Russia) in 1890. He also served as an honorary professor of civil and commerce law at the University of Königsberg. The university named him Doctor iuris honoris causa in 1903.

After his retirement in 1907, Albert Mosse returned to Berlin and became involved in communal politics. He served on the Board of City Council and advised the Berlin municipal administration on various legal matters. He also served as the vice-president of the Verband der deutschen Juden (the Union of German Jews) and president of the Board of the Hochschule für die Wissenschaft der Judentums (College for Jewish Studies) in Berlin.

Albert Mosse died on May 30, 1925 in Berlin, Germany.

Mosse, Marcus

portrait of Marcus Mosse (1808-1865)
Marcus Mosse
(1808-1865)

Marcus Mosse was born in 1808 in Märkisch-Friedland (then Lower Lusatia, Germany, now Miroslawiec, Poland). His father Salomon Moses (Marcus Mosse changed his last name) died three years later in 1811 and his mother Henriette (Jüttel) neé Markus (Levin) remarried his business partner Jacob Fuchs. He entered the grammar school (Gymnasium) in Luckau in 1822 and finished in 1829. He started medical studies at the university in Berlin and received his medical degree in 1832. In 1836 Marcus Mosse married Ulrike Wolff. They had fourteen children - eight sons and six daughters.

In 1833 he was appointed as a municipal physician for the poor in Spremberg (Lusatia, Germany), but two years later he signed a contract with the Jewish community in Grätz (then the Grand-Duchy of Posen, now Grodzisk Wielkopolski, Poland) and functioned as a practical physician for the local Jewish poor. He soon achieved a place of prominence in Grätz and was appointed to the town council from where he later resigned. In the revolutionary year 1848 he strongly supported the liberal movement and his pro-Polish attitudes earned him a police interrogation and incarceration. After his release Marcus Mosse returned to his practice.

Marcus Mosse died after a long heart illness on November 10, 1865.

Mosse, Rudolf

portrait of Rudolf Mosse (1843-1920)
Rudolf Mosse
(1843-1920)

Rudolf Mosse was born on May 8, 1843 in Grätz (then the Grand-Duchy of Posen, now Grodzisk Wielkopolski, Poland) to Marcus Mosse and Ulrike Mosse (neé Wolff). He attended the grammar school in Lissa (then Germany, now Leszno, Poland), but for economic reasons he did not finish. At the age of fifteen he became a bookstore apprentice in Posen (then Prussia, Germany; now Poznan, Poland). After a short period in Berlin, where he stayed with his oldest brother Salomon, he started working for the publisher of the magazine Gartenlaube, Robert Apitsch, in Leipzig, Saxony. There he came up with idea of soliciting advertisements and established a dedicated advertising supplement to the publication. His idea proved to be a commercial success.

On January 1, 1867 Rudolf Mosse opened his own newspaper advertising agency (Zeitungs-Annoncen Expedition) in Berlin. Soon he opened several independent branches in Germany, i.e. Munich (München), Stuttgart, and Hamburg, but also abroad Basel, Zürich, Vienna, and Prague. By 1917 the company had 18 independent branches and 280 agencies both in Germany and abroad.

In 1873, Rudolf Mosse married the daughter of a businessman, Benjamin Loewenstein, Emilie, in Trier. Soon thereafter they adopted Felicia (neé Marx).

Despite the economic success of his advertisement business, of broader notoriety is Rudolf Mosse's connection to the leading liberal daily the Berliner Tageblatt that he founded in 1871. It was originally founded as a commercial periodical, but under the leadership of the editor-in-chief Arthur Levysohn, who joined the Berliner Tageblatt in 1881, the political news section was organized, and the paper took on a liberal character. Arthur Levysohn retired in 1906. He was succeeded by Rudolf Mosse's cousin and correspondent of the Berliner Tageblatt from Paris, Theodor Wolff. Under his influence the paper became the stalwart of the left liberalism in Germany.

Besides the Berliner Tageblatt Rudolf Mosse acquired several other newspapers in Berlin, Germany, i.e Berliner Morgen-Zeitung , and Berliner Volks-Zeitung. Rudolf Mosse also controlled several publications abroad, among others Zürcher Post (Zürich, Switzerland), Deutsche Warschauer Zeitung (Warsaw, Poland), or Balkanska Poshta (Sofia, Bulgaria). In addition to daily newspapers, Rudolf Mosse's company published circa 130 professional and trade periodicals. It also had a book publishing division and its own printing house.

The charitable and art-patronage activities of Rudolf Mosse also deserve mentioning. Together with his wife Emilie Mosse he founded a home for children of impoverished families, the "Emilie- und Rudolf Mosse-Stiftung" in Wilmersdorf (Germany). He opened a hospital in Grätz and established an insurance fund for his employees. His gifts to various educational and public institutions were recognized with an honorary degree from the University of Heidelberg. Rudolf Mosse also served on the board of the Berlin Jewish Reform Community.

With the changed social and economic situation in Germany after the First World War, Rudolf Mosse withdrew from public life and died on September 8, 1920 in Schenkendorf, Germany.

Lachmann-Mosse, Hans

portrait of Hans Lachmann Mosse (1885-1955)
Hans Lachmann-Mosse
(1885-1944)

Hans Lachmann-Mosse was born on August 9, 1885 in Berlin to industrialist Georg Lachmann and Hedwig (neé Eltzbacher). He studied law in Freiburg im Breisgau and Berlin. In 1909 he married the only (adoptive) daughter of the press magnate Rudolf Mosse; later their last names were united. He served in the German army throughout the First World War.

He worked for the Rudolf Mosse publishing house beginning in 1910, developing and administrating the social and charitable activities of the Rudolf Mosse company. After the death of his father-in-law in 1920 he took over managerial responsibilities as well as partial ownership of the concern. He tried to expand the business, but his investments were not always met with the approval of others in the top management, including the editor-in-chief of the Berliner Tageblatt, Theodor Wolff. The economic difficulties in which the Rudolf Mosse company found itself at the end of the 1920s were made even worse by the depression in Germany at the beginning of the 1930s. The company declared bankruptcy. In 1933 the NSDAP seized control over its business in Germany.

Hans Lachmann-Mosse left Germany for France in 1933. He divorced in 1939 and soon after married Karola Strauch on March 23, 1939. Later, they emigrated to the United States and settled in California.

Hans Lachmann-Mosse sat on the Board of the Reform Jewish community in Berlin and presided over its liturgy commission. Some of the restitution material in this collection relates to the reform Jewish liturgy. He also was an art collector and benefactor. In 1923 he commissioned Erich Mendelsohn to renovate of the Rudolf Mosse edifice in Berlin.

Hans Lachmann-Mosse died on April 18, 1944 in Oakland, California.

Lachmann-Mosse, Hilde

portrait of Hilde Lachmann Mosse (1912-1982)
Hilde Lachmann-Mosse
(1912-1982)

Hilde Lachmann-Mosse was born in Berlin as the daughter of Hans and Felicia Lachmann-Mosse on January 28, 1912. She attended the Staatliche August-Schule in Berlin between 1919-1931. Thereafter she studied medicine, first at the Albert-Ludwigs Universität in Freiburg im Breisgau, later in Bonn. After the NSDAP take-over in Germany she continued her studies at the University of Basel (Basler Universität), Switzerland, where she received her medical degree in 1938.

During her studies in Berlin she participated in the Jugendgemeinschaft der Jüdischen Reformgemeinde (Youth Association of the Berlin Reform Jewish Community) that was traditionally supported by her family. Hilde Lachmann-Mosse was always interested in social issues. When she studied in Basel, she participated in relief efforts on behalf of the German emigrés, particularly physicians. In 1938, she left Switzerland for the United States.

Hilde Lachmann Mosse's original specialization was pediatrics, but soon she became interested in child-psychology and psychiatry. Together with Fredric Wertham she founded the Lafargue Clinic in Harlem, New York, which was the first free mental health clinic on the eastern coast of the United States. Another of her research interests was reading disorders. She was also captivated by the relationship of violence and mass media.

Later, Hilde Lachmann-Mosse became a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at the New York Medical College. She lectured as Fulbright Professor for Child Psychiatry at the University of Marburg, Germany in 1964-1965.

Her book The complete handbook of children's reading disorders was published posthumously.

Hilde Lachmann-Mosse died on January 15, 1982 in New York.

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Scope and Content Note

The collection of the Mosse family represents an excellent source for researchers investigating the social and economic ascent of Jewish families during the German state building and Imperial period, stretching over four generations. The most represented from this family is the line of Marcus Mosse's son Rudolf Mosse, the publisher and entrepreneur, his daughter, Felicia, and the three grandchildren Rudolf, Hilde, and George Lachmann-Mosse. Some material on other lines, namely the offspring of Emil and Albert Mosse, can also be found here. The papers of Martha Mosse, daughter of Albert Mosse, deserve to be mentioned in this respect.

The founder of the extended clan, Marcus Mosse, was a local country physician. He held the education and social security of his eight sons and six daughters in high regard and despite his rather modest economic situation he made arrangements in order to secure both for them. Since Marcus Mosse's activity in 1848 one can observe a continuous strain of allegiance to the liberal principals of the German Bildungsbürgertum that was later represented on the pages of the Berliner Tageblatt founded by his son Rudolf Mosse. The views of many members of the Mosse family can be analyzed in the correspondence that is held in the collection, most notably the letters of Marcus Mosse, Albert Mosse, Rudolf Mosse, and Hilde Lachmann-Mosse. Correspondence is the most prominent genre of the collection, both in the form of personal correspondence in the subgroup of personal papers and as part of the subgroup of business records of the family enterprises.

Various awards and acknowledgments that were granted to individual members for their social activities underscore the significance of the family as a whole. Rudolf Mosse distinguished himself as an entrepreneur and benefactor who displayed social concerns and generously donated for charitable and social purposes. Albert Mosse participated in drafting the Japanese constitution, several trade agreements, and several other legal drafts of the Japanese government, and after his retirement served on the Berlin municipal council. Other brothers and sisters also had significant impact on their communities, both as academics, businessmen, or as members of various social and charitable committees. Many members of the family participated in the life of the Berlin Jewish Reform community, namely Rudolf Mosse, Albert Mosse, Hans Lachmann-Mosse, and his daughter and grand daughter of Rudolf Mosse, Hilde Lachmann-Mosse.

Besides correspondence and personal items, the collection also contains newspaper clippings documenting various events pertaining to the individual members of the family or to the family business. One can also find a number of images, mostly portraits that were removed to the Photograph Collection of the Leo Baeck Institute.

The collection contains some business records of the firm Rudolf Mosse, mostly from the 1920s and 1930s. The founder and owner of the Rudolf Mosse enterprise, Rudolf Mosse died in 1920. His son-in-law, Hans Lachmann-Mosse, inherited 50% of the Berliner Tageblatt and his wife and the only daughter of Rudolf Mosse, Felicia, the rest. Rudolf Mosse stipulated in his will the positions of his cousins Martin Carbe and Theodor Wolff as managing director and editor-in-chief, respectively. Hans Lachmann-Mosse pushed forward expansive investments into advertising abroad, real-estate, and art cinemas. However, the company could not sustain such expansion and later economic depression and political changes in Germany resulted in serious problems. The collection documents efforts of the management to secure some of the assets and assure further existence of at least some business assets.

The records consist of business correspondence, newspaper clippings, and several publications on the management practices in the Rudolf Mosse company. The records of the Zürich branch, where some of the activities of the Berlin central office were transferred once Hans Lachmann-Mosse and his family left Berlin in 1933, are the most prominent part of that subgroup. The director of the Zürcher branch, Alfred Schwabacher, also coordinated most of the activities in the other European division and was instrumental in rescuing parts of the Mosse family and company property. Other European offices are represented only sporadically.

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Arrangement

The collection is divided into two subgroups. The subgroup of personal paper is organized in seven series and the subgroup of the records of the Rudolf Mosse company is arranged in six series.

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Restrictions

Access Restrictions

Open to researchers.

Use Restrictions

There may be some restrictions on the use of the collection. For more information, contact
Leo Baeck Institute
Center for Jewish History
15 West 16th Street
New York, NY 10011

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Related Material

The George L. Mosse Collection at the Leo Baeck Archives (AR 25137).

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Separated Material

Books were removed to the LBI library, including the gift of a publication mapping the publishing industry in pre-war Germany to Rudolf Mosse on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of his firm. The books are available on microfiche (MF 116).

All photographs were removed from the collection and are part of to the Photograph Collection at the LBI Archives.

The diaries of Hilde Mosse are now part of the Memoir Collection LBI (ME 1211).

The correspondence of Albert Mosse was removed from the collection in 2000, but was reintegrated during re-processing in 2004.

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Other finding aids

There are several inventory lists and an item level description of the content of the bound documents and papers of Marcus Mosse.

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Preferred Citation

Published citations should take the following form:

Identification of item, date (if known); Mosse family collection; AR 25184; box number; folder number; Leo Baeck Institute at the Center for Jewish History.

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Processing Information

In 2004 the collection was reprocessed and a new finding aid was written. The collection of Alfred Mosse was reintegrated to the Mosse family collection. The personal documents and correspondence of Marcus Mosse were bound in a volume. This binding was taken apart and individual letters sorted by the addressees. Documents were filed into topical folders. All photographs and images were removed from the collection to the Photograph Collection at the Leo Baeck Institute Archives and substituted with photocopies. Similarly, several over-sized items were moved to an over-sized box, OS 39, and substituted with photocopies.

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Access points

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Container List

 

Subgroup I: Personal papers, 1676-2001.

The subgroup is mostly in German and English, some documents are in Polish, Japanese, Latin, Greek, and Judeo-German.
4.4 linear feet
Arrangement:

Arranged in alphabetical order by the name of the family member. The members of the Mosse family precede those from the Lachmann-Mosse family .

Scope and Content:

These documents came to the Leo Baeck Institute Archives at various ways in different times, usually as addenda. Sometimes the provenance of these documents is not well documented. In general, the papers of the individual family members provide researchers with often intimate views into the life of a Jewish family, even if the Mosse family was not typical of other German Jewish families. The destinies of various members of the family, who became entrepreneurs, lawyers, and scholars demonstrate well professional alleys many Jews in Germany took moving up on the social ladder during the economic and cultural boom after 1871.

Series 1 contains personal items, correspondence, newspaper clippings, and several images of Albert Mosse. Most documents relate to his appointment as a legal expert to the Japanese government in the years 1886-1890. His letters offer a unique perspective into the functioning of Japanese society on the brink of the 20th century as seen through the eyes of a German legal expert. They also disclose the personal and professional character of Albert Mosse.

Series 2 documents the life of Marcus Mosse. Researchers can find material related to his studies, his medical practice, and also to his political involvement in 1848 here. Next to the personal documents, and an extensive correspondence to Marcus Mosse's children, the series includes a shorter essay on the Jewish question and several reports. Given the later prominence of the many offspring of Marcus and Ulrike Mosse, his correspondence to his children can serve as a great source for understanding the educational and cultural background for the research of the family ascent up the social ladder of Imperial Germany.

Series 3 conveys the entrepreneurial achievements and charitable activities of Rudolf Mosse, the founder and owner of the Berliner Tageblatt. The series includes material related to the Emilie – und Rudolf Mosse Stiftung and the hospital in Grätz, some documents acknowledging the significance and contributions of Rudolf Mosse, and correspondence.

The property of the family of Rudolf Mosse was seized by the Nazis soon after their take-over. The family left Germany almost immediately. The correspondence of Rudolf Mosse's daughter Felicia Lachmann-Mosse reflects some aspects of emigré life, but mainly material in series 4 relates to the restitution of the family property in Germany during the 1950s, and her own estate.

Series 5 contains the papers of Hans Lachmann-Mosse, son-in-law of Rudolf Mosse and husband of his only daughter Felicia. Next to the correspondence, it contains several personal items, including souvenirs and memorabilia of Hans Lachmann and Felicia Mosse's wedding, and newspaper clippings. Several items related to the history of the Lachmann family can also be found here.

Series 6: Personal items and correspondence of Hilde L. Mosse documents her avid interest in social and contemporary political issues. She actively participated in the Jugendgemeinschaft der Jüdischen Reformgemeinde (Youth group of the Reform Jewish Community) in Berlin and this series holds several items related to the Berlin Jewish community and the broader Liberal and Reform streams within European Judaism.

Her correspondence reflects the upheavals on the European continent. It mirrors the life of a young medical student in Switzerland concerned about the development in Europe, the transition in emigration, and difficulty reconnecting with former friends in post-war Germany. Hilde Lachmann Mosse's letters also attest to her deep concern about the political developments in Europe, in the United States, and in civil and human rights.

Series 7 contains documents relevant to the family as a whole as well as various family histories of family members whose papers are scarce or unsubstantial. The papers of Martha Mosse can be of interest to researchers, since they contain personal accounts of her behavior in the concentration camp Terezín/Teresienstadt. Her correspondence also reflects the uneasy integration into post-war German society.

Series 1: Mosse, Albert,  1866-1997.

The subgroup is mostly in German, Japanese, and English.
0.8 linear feet
Arrangement:

Arranged by topic.

Scope and Content:

This series contains personal items, correspondence, newspaper clippings, and several images of Albert Mosse. Most of the material relates to his function as a consultant of the Japanese government implementing legal reform in Japan, but his political and religious involvement is also documented here.

There are two groups of correspondence in this series. One is related to Albert Mosse's stay in Japan and one contains letters to his daughter Dora Panofsky. The letters of Albert Mosse to his wife, parents, and siblings illustrate the personal and professional character of Albert Mosse's activities in Japan. The original letters are bound in two volumes. One holds correspondence to Albert Mosse's wife Caroline and the other letters to his parents, brothers, and sisters. The series also includes typed transcripts of the correspondence.

The other set of letters are addressed to Dora and Erwin Panofsky and are written by Albert Mosse and Caroline Mosse. These letters span from the end of the First World War until the death of Albert Mosse in 1926, and the letters from Caroline Mosse one year later, until 1927.

The subseries pertaining to Albert Mosse's activity in Japan gathers several original documents, the Order of the Rising Sun, and several publications reflecting his work in Japan.

Subseries A: Personal,  1866-1926.

The subseries is in German.
0.1 linear feet
Arrangement:

The material arranged alphabetically by the folder title.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains several personal items of Albert Mosse which shed light on his political and professional activities. Besides some biographical notes, condolence and congratulatory letters, the series also includes a list of candidates of the Liberal party seeking election into the representative body of the Berlin Jewish community.

Albert Mosse also received an honorary citizenship from the city of Ortelsburg (then East Prussia, Germany; now Szczytno, Poland), which was badly damaged by the Russian army during the First World War. As a way to help Ortelsburg and other similarly affected settlements recover, a network of patron cities (Pathenstadt) was created that tried to facilitate rebuilding of the areas. Albert Mosse was one of the Berlin City Council members and became deputy president of the Kriegshilfsverein Berlin für den Kreis Ortelsburg (Ortelsburg War Relief Association). As an acknowledgment of Alfred Mosse's effort on behalf of the region he was named an honorary citizen.

Box Folder Title Date
1 1 Biographical notes 1910, 1926
1 2 Condolence letters 1925
1 3 Congratulation letters - 70th and 75th Birthday 1916, 1921
1 4 Dijon – Map undated
1 5 Honorary citizenship (Ehrenbürgerschaft) of the city of Ortelsburg 1917
1 6 Legal opinion 1872
1 7 List of candidates of the Liberal party for the representation in the Berlin Jewish community 1887
1 8 Notes 1871?
1 9 Photos 1890, 1916
1 10 Verification of birth date 1866

Subseries B: Correspondence,  1870-1926.

This subseries is in German.
0.5 linear feet
Arrangement:

This subseries is arranged alphabetically by name of the correspondent.

Scope and Content:

The correspondence of Albert Mosse provides an excellent source of information about his and his family's experiences in Japan, especially the letters to Albert Mosse's parents and siblings. The subseries also contains letters from Albert Mosse and Caroline Mosse to their daughter Dora, who married art historian Erwin Panofsky, and several letters to the widow Caroline Mosse and son Walter from the officials of the Tokyo Institute for Municipal Research.

The letters from Japan both to Albert Mosse's wife Caroline and his parents are bound. The other correspondence is on loose leaves.

Box Folder Title Date
1 11 Colleagues 1888, 1897
1 12 Colleagues - Japan 1890-1923
1 13 Mosse, Carolina- Japan 1886-1889
1 14 Mosse, Caroline – Transcripts 1886-1889
1 15 Mosse, Caroline and Walter 1930-1932
1 16 Mosse, Marcus and Ulrike and siblings 1870-1871, 1882, 1887, 1893
1 17 Mosse, Marcus and Ulrike and siblings – Japan 1886-1889
1 18 Mosse, Marcus and Ulrike and siblings – Transcripts 1886 March-April
1 19 Mosse, Marcus and Ulrike and siblings – Transcripts 1886 April-July
1 20 Mosse, Marcus and Ulrike and siblings – Transcripts 1886 August-1887 January
1 21 Mosse, Marcus and Ulrike and siblings – Transcripts 1887 January-July
1 22 Mosse, Marcus and Ulrike and siblings – Transcripts 1887 July-December
1 23 Mosse, Marcus and Ulrike and siblings – Transcripts 1888 January-October
1 24 Mosse, Marcus and Ulrike and siblings – Transcripts 1888 October-1890
1 25 Panofsky, Dora and Erwin 1916-1924
1 26 Panofsky, Dora and Erwin – Letters by Mosse, Caroline 1917-1926

Subseries C: Japan,  1870-1926.

This subseries is in German and Japanese.
0.2 linear feet
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by folder title.

Scope and Content:

This subseries holds material that reflects the work of Albert Mosse in Japan. It contains a copy of the Law on Organization of the City and Town Administration (Local Self-Government law, Gesetz über Organization der Verwaltung von Städten und Dörfen) that was authored by Albert Mosse, and his memorandum to the Japanese ambassador on the commercial pact between Germany and Japan. In 1938 the fifty year anniversary of the Local Self-Government Law was celebrated and resulted in several articles in the professional as well as the regular daily press. The articles and newspaper clippings from the Journal of the Tokyo Institute for Municipal Research and Tokyo Asahi Shimbun can be found here.

The success of Albert Mosse's activity can be proven by the Order of Rising Sun which he was awarded, as well as by several extensions of his contract that are part of this subseries as well. Eventually several books on the topic of the modernization of legislature in Japan, mentioning the role of Albert Mosse, appeared. Researchers can see the reviews of some of them here, together with several articles by a historian of the Meiji period, Yukichi Sakai.

Box Folder Title Date
1 27 Articles – Book reviews 1971, 1997
1 28 Articles – Journal of the Tokyo Institute for Municipal Research 1931, 1938
1 29 Articles – Sakai, Yukichi 1977-1978
1 30 Contracts 1886-1888
1 31 Imperial Japanese Order of the Rising Sun undated
1 32 Local Self-Government law 1888
1 33 Local Self-Government law – the 50th Anniversary 1938
1 34 Memorandum to the Japanese Ambassador 1897

Series 2: Mosse, Marcus,  1828-1976.

This series is in German, Polish, English, Latin, Greek, and Judeo-German.
0.6 linear foot
Arrangement:

Arranged by topic.

Scope and Content:

The personal items and documents of Marcus Mosse related to his studies, his medical work and practice, and his political activities in 1848 are part of this series. It also contains a short essay on the Jewish question.

Given the later prominence of the many offspring of Marcus and Ulrike Mosse, his correspondence to his children can serve as an excellent source for research on a Jewish family household and the study of upwards mobility of the Jews in Prussia and the German Empire.

The letters are usually handwritten. The series also contains typed transcripts, not only of the correspondence, but also the essay on the Jewish question. Several letters are also translated. The series includes correspondence between several relatives of Marcus Mosse who took it upon themselves to prepar a transcription of his original letters.

Subseries A: Personal,  1828-1865, 1909, 1976.

The subseries is in German, Polish, Latin, Greek, and Judeo-German.
0.2 linear feet
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by folder title.

Scope and Content:

The personal items and documents of Marcus Mosse can be found in this subseries. The subseries documents his education well. It contains his leaving exam certificate from the grammar school (Gymnasium) in Luckau, Lower Lusatia, and circa twenty loose leaves from an autograph book with quotations and poems in Latin, Greek, and German. They are mostly dated Luckau 1828, but also contain entries from Berlin, Calau, and Cottbus from later years.

Marcus Mosse's career as a physician is evinced by his medical licenses (Approbation), his dissertation De transpirationis et sudoris dignitate, the degree of Doctor medicinae et chirurgiae he received, his commission as a municipal physician, and several shorter reports Marcus Mosse wrote in his professional capacity.

Marcus Mosse's engagement during the revolutionary years 1848/1849 is proven by the freeze on his mortgage and his account of the criminal investigation against him. The series also contains a family tree chart, a naturalization patent, and two biographical articles, though one of them is purely anecdotal and has only loose a connection to the personality of Marcus Mosse. The short essay on the Jewish question Zur jüdishen Frage can also be found here.

Box Folder Title Date
1 35 Autograph book 1828-1830
1 36 Biographical articles 1909, 1976
1 37 Burger certificate (Bürgerbrief) 1846
1 38 Commission as Municipal physician for the poor (Communal Armen-Arzt) 1833
1 39 Criminal investigation and freezing of a mortgage – Letter to the Probst undated, 1848
1 40 Death - Announcement of Marcus Mosse - Posner Zeitung 1865
1 41 Death – Excerpts from the diary of Mr. Landmann 1865
1 42 Dissertation 1832, 1921
1 43 Family tree undated
1 44 Financial aid applications 1863-1965
1 45 Leaving exam – Gymnasium (Luckau, Lower Lusatia) 1828
1 46 Marital contract 1836
1 47 Medical degree – Doctor medicinae et chirurgiae 1832
1 48 Medical licenses (Approbation) - Attestations and receipts 1832-1833
1 49 Medical studies 1827-1830
1 50 Naturalization patent – Great Duchy of Posen 1838
1 51 Neutomischel (then Germany, now Nowy Tomysl, Poland) – Acknowledgment and remuneration for help in fighting cholera 1849, 1853
1 52 Photos undated
1 53 Prayer undated
1 54 Realschule (then Grätz, Germany; now Grodzisk Wielkopolski, Poland) 1853
1 55 Release from the Town council 1847
1 56 Sanitation instruction for a hospital in Grätz 1861
1 57 Die staatliche Aufsicht über die Gesundheit in den Schulen [The State Supervision over the Health in the Schools] 1862
1 58 Testament 1862
1 59 Testament – Provisions 1865
1 60 Testament -Resignation on inheritance – Salomon and Theodor Mosse 1861
1 61 Zur Judenfrage [To the Jewish Question] undated

Subseries B: Correspondence,  1830-1865, 1965-1966.

This subseries is in German, English, and Judeo-German.
0.4 linear feet
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by last name of the recipiant.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains letters written by Marcus Mosse mainly to his children. While most of the letters are handwritten those written to Rudolf Mosse are typed. The extensive correspondence to Carl Litthauer and his daughter Therese provides a good insight into the everyday life of Marcus Mosse as a country physician, including his practice and events in the family. The letters to unidentified family members contain letters by Marcus Mosse where the addressees are not disclosed. The letter to Marcus Mosse's mother I. Fuchs was copied by Simon Fuchs.

Most of the letters were transcribed and typed in several copies. The final steps of the transcription process are hinted at the letters of Eva Noack-Mosse, Martha Mosse, Käthe Olschki, and Walter Mosse, all part of this subseries.

Box Folder Title Date
2 1 Fuchs, I. 1830
2 2 Lithauer, Carl and Therese neé Mosse 1863-1865
2 3 Mayer, Bianca (niece) 1853
2 4 Molinek, ? 1865
2 5 Mosse, Albert 1860-1865
2 6 Mosse, Anna 1859-1865
2 7 Mosse, Paul 1865
2 8 Mosse, Rudolf 1858-1865
2 9 Mosse, Solomon 1857-1865
2 10 Mosse, Theodor 1857-1865
2 11 Mosse, Therese 1854-1855, 1864
2 12 Mosse, Ulrike 1844
2 13 Mosse, Wolfgang 1855
2 14 Mosse – Unidentified family members 1854-1865
2 15 Philippsohn, Ludwig 1862
2 16 Samter, J. 1863
2 17 Tagowski, S. 1865
2 18 Transcripts 1830-1865
2 19 Transcripts 1830-1862
2 20 Transcripts 1863-1865
2 21 Transcripts – Correspondence 1965-1966
2 22 Transcripts – English translations 1830, 1844

Series 3: Mosse, Rudolf,  1860-1977.

This series is in German, English, and Latin.
0.3 linear feet
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by folder title.

Scope and Content:

This series contains several documents related to Rudolf Mosse and to his entrepreneurial achievements, out of which the Berliner Tageblatt is the most prominent. The series also documents several of his philanthropic activities, for instance donations to the University of Heidelberg, the children's home "Emilie–und Rudolf Mosse Stiftung", and the hospital in Grätz (then Germany, now Grodzisk Wielkopolski). Rudolf Mosse's deeds were publicly acknowledged and several streets and squares named after him, including one in Berlin. During the Nazi-period all these places were renamed, but in the 1950s this was corrected. The other group of materials deals with the commemoration of Rudolf Mosse's life and activities after his death, in obituaries in newspapers and memorial speeches by Julius Jelski of the Jüdisches Reformgemeinde in Berlin. Finally, the series includes several letters, some of them from members of the broader Mosse family, addressed to George L. Mosse from various scholars or researchers interested in the life of Rudolf Mosse.

Box Folder Title Date
2 23 Art collection – catalogs undated, 1921, 1929
2 24 Berliner Tageblatt – Congratulations on 30th Anniversary 1897
2 25 Business card undated
2 26 Correspondence - Braus, H. (Badische Direktion der Anatomie Heidelberg, Germany) 1920-1921
2 27 Correspondence – Hartog, Jacques 1908
2 28 Correspondence – Mosse, Marcus and Ulrike 1860
2 29 Correspondence - On Rudolf Mosse 1958-1976
2 30 Doctor honoris causa degree 1918
2 31 Emilie- und Rudolf Mosse Stiftung [Emilie and Rudolf Mosse Foundation] 1920-1930
2 32 Memorial speech 1920
2 33 Obituaries and commemorative articles undated, 1920, 1952-1977
2 34 Presentation of a new hospital in Grätz (then Germany, now Grodzisk Wielkopolski) – Toast by Rudolf Mosse 1891
2 35 Photos undated, 1882, 1898, 1913
2 36 Public Commemorations 1915, 1959

Series 4: Lachmann-Mosse, Felicia,  1890-1980.

This series is in German and English.
0.3 linear foot
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by folder title.

Scope and Content:

Most of the material in the series of Felicia Lachmann-Mosse pertains to the restitution of the family property in Germany in the 1950s and the inheritance process after her death on February 13, 1972. The inheritance process involved correspondence with family lawyers and bankers. Part of this series is also a report written probably by Hilde Lachmann-Mosse that throws some light on the life of the family Lachmann-Mosse before the Second World War and its further destiny during emigration. This report together with medical and psychological opinions was part of the restitution efforts of the family. Apart from her legal correspondence, mostly with her lawyer Leonard Leighton and her children, there are several letters from her friends and an album with letters and short poems written by Alfred Traeger.

Box Folder Title Date
2 37 Autograph Book 1890-1908
2 38 Condolences 1972
2 39 Correspondence 1908, 1940, 1946
2 40 Death and Funeral 1958-1970, 1972
2 41 Divorce certificate 1939, 1979-1980
2 42 Estate 1970-1973
2 43 Estate – Correspondence between George L. Mosse and Hilde L. Mosse 1972-1973
2 44 Maid of honor - Newspaper clipping 1905
2 45 Photos undated, 1902-1915, 1934
2 46 Restitutions 1958-1959, 1971, 1973
2 47 Restitutions - Medical report 1957
2 48 Testament 1959, 1971
2 49 Traeger, Albert – Letters, poems, and album 1896-1906

Series 5: Lachmann-Mosse, Hans,  1676, 1802, 1892-1949.

This series is in German and English and one document is in Turkish.
0.3 linear foot
Arrangement:

Arranged by folder title.

Scope and Content:

This series contains the papers of Hans Lachmann-Mosse. In addition to the correspondence, it contains several personal items, and newspaper clippings that usually present him as an heir to the great publishing enterprise out of which he was ousted by the Nazi-regime. The series contains two merits from the Red Cross and Red Crescent, respectively. There is a short article on the history of the Lachmann family, but this account is rather anecdotal and far from comprehensive. There is a copy of the marriage certificate of his second marriage in this series, along with the illustrated wedding chronicle of the wedding of Hans Lachmann and Felicia Mosse in 1909 and also of Hans Lachmann's sister Olga Lachmann and Herbert Gingsburg (later Gilbert) in 1910. While the former one attempted to emulate the daily the Berliner Tageblatt, the latter mimicked its satirical supplement ULK.

The collection also contains several letters to Hans Lachmann that terminate club memberships due to the Nuremberg laws, i.e Deutsche Orient-Gesellschaft and Gesellschaft für Ostasiatische Kunst. An album with illustrated postcards of various German towns dated 1892 through 1900 that are mostly addressed to Hans Lachmann can also be found in this series. There is correspondence with the representative of the Liberal Jewish Synagogue in London, Israel Mattuk, whose advice Hans Lachmann-Mosse sought in finding an appropriate educational institution for his son George (Gerhard). Hans Lachmann-Mosse was also active in the Jüdische Reformgemeinde Berlin. An image of the arrival of the wedding guests to his and Felicia Mosse's wedding is in the oversized box.

A folder with the concert program of Yvette Guilbert belongs to the collection, but its relation to any member of the family is not clear. The same can be said of the marital contract between Johann Philipp Strack and Barbara Längfelder(?) of 1676, a letter by Ludwig Lorie (?) from 1802, and a sonatina authored by Hedda Wagner. These items came with the collection and were mentioned as such in the correspondence of the heir George L. Mosse and the secretary of the Leo Back Institute.

Box Folder Title Date
3 1 Acknowledgment - Merits for the Red Crescent (Turkey) undated
3 2 Acknowledgment - Merits for the Red Cross (Vienna, Austria) 1918
3 3 Bar-mitzvah speech 1898
3 4 Concert flier 1932
3 5 Congratulations - 50th Birthday 1935
3 6 Correspondence - ?, Fritz (cousin) 1904
3 7 Correspondence - Lachmann, Georg undated, 1892-1896
3 8 Correspondence - Mattuk, Israel 1933
3 9 Correspondence - Vely, Emma 1931
3 10 Correspondence - Various 1917-1926
3 11 Course book - Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau 1905
3 12 Course book - Universität Berlin 1905-1906
3 13 Death certificate - Copy 1949
3 14 Family history undated
3 15 Fünf Gedichte aus Hans Bethge. Pfirsichblüten aus China. Berlin 1928, [6] leaves.
3 16 Guilbert, Yvette - Concert programs 1912, 1926
3 17 Jüdische Reformgemeinde in Berlin 1935-1936
3 18 Leaving exam - Newspaper announcement 1905
3 19 Lorie ?, Ludwig - Letter 1802
3 20 Marital contract - Johann Philipp Strack and Barbara Längfelder 1767
3 21 Marriage certificate - Copy 1939
3 22 Memberships - Cancellations 1935-1938
3 23 Newspaper clippings 1939-1960, 1970
3 24 Postcard album 1892-1900
3 25 Sonatine für Flöte und Klavier op. 126 by Wagner, Hedda - Autographed undated
3 26 ULK - Mock wedding chronicle for Olga Lachmann and Herbert Gingsburg (later Gilbert) 1910
3 27 Welt Spiegel - Mock wedding chronicle for Felicia and Hans Lachmann-Mosse 1909

Series 6: Lachmann-Mosse, Hilde,  1926-1988.

This series is in German and English.
1.7 linear feet
Arrangement:

Arranged by folder title.

Scope and Content:

This series holds a variety of materials that relate to her studies in Germany and Switzerland and partly also documents her academic interest in child psychiatry. However, there is no material pertaining to her research and professional work except some correspondence and several articles. The series conveys Hilde Lachmann Mosse's interest in social and political problems and also her involvement in Reform Judaism, at least in her youth when she participated in the Jugendgemeinschaft der Jüdischen Reformgemeinde (Berlin Jewish Reform Community). Material on her emigration to the United States can also be found here.

The personality of Hilde Lachmann-Mosse is best reflected in her correspondence both to her family and friends. Her letters reveal to researchers her views on the political situation in the United States and in the world in general in the mid-1960s and 1970s, reflections of her professional work, as well as information about her personal life. The correspondence with her father Hans Lachmann-Mosse covers the time she left her Berlin home pursuing her studies in 1931 until his death in 1944, hence one can see the personal and intellectual development of Hilde Lachmann-Mosse. Many correspondents of Hilde Lachmann-Mosse were her friends from pre-war Germany and she kept in touch with them after 1945. Many of them lived in East Germany, so this correspondence can also contain some hints about everyday life in that part of Germany.

Subseries A: Personal,  1926-1988.

The subseries is in German and English.
0.7 linear feet
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by folder title.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains personal documents of Hilde Lachmann-Mosse. One can find her school records and essays from the Staatliche Augusta-Schule in Berlin, which she attended between the years 1918-1931, as well as her report books from universities in Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany and Basel, Switzerland. After graduation from the Staatliche Augusta-Schule, Hilde Lachmann-Mosse went for a summer semester to a Woodbrooke settlement in England.

Hilde Lachmann-Mosse took active part in the youth group of the Jugendgemeinschaft der Jüdischen Reformgemeinde (Berlin Jewish Reform Community). The series contains several newsletters of the community, several prayer books, and pamphlets addressing various issues of Jewish life from the perspective of Reform Judaism, and the speech Hilde Lachmann Mosse gave at the 2nd World Union for Progressive Judaism in London in 1930.

The original medical specialization of Hilde Lachmann-Mosse was pediatrics, but after her emigration to the United States, she became more involved in child psychiatry. Several of her articles found here deal with child psychiatry, and the relationship between mass media and violence.

Box Folder Title Date
3 28 Address book undated
3 29 Arbeitskreis dialektischer Astrologie [Working group of the dialectical Astrology] - Textbook 1933
3 30 Articles - By Hilde Lachmann-Mosse 1948-1969
3 31 Articles - On Hilde Lachmann-Mosse 1946, 1957, 1958
3 32 Autograph book 1919-1922
3 33 Award - Two Thousand Women of Achievement 1972
3 34 Certificate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology 1951
3 35 Certificates and affidavits 1935-1938
3 36 Report book - Albert-Ludwigs Universität (Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany) 1932
3 37 Report book - Universität Basel (Switzerland) 1933-1938
3 38 Curriculum vitae 1933?
3 39 Diaries and calendars 1926-1934
3 40 Diary 1934
3 41 Drawings, water-colors, and sketches undated
3 42 Emigration 1933, 1938-1941, 1967
3 43 Emigration - Employment inquiries 1936-1937
3 44 Emigration - Help to German emigrés 1933
3 45 Emigration - HIAS - Mosse, Kurt 1941
3 46 Friedrich-Wilhelms Universität (Bonn, Germany) 1933
3 47 Gérard, Rolf - Sketches undated
3 48 Hiruga island - Children game 1925-1926
3 49 Membership and identity cards 1941, 1956, 1977
3 50 Newspaper clippings - Central Verein Zeitung 1938
3 51 Newspaper clippings - the Reichstag Fire (1933) and Nazi take-over 1947-1980
3 52 Newspaper clippings - German Democratic Republic and East Berlin 1971-1973
3 53 Newspaper clippings - German Democratic Republic Press 1968
3 54 Photos - Daniels, Clesbie 1948, 1962-1970
3 55 Photos - Wertham farm (Penn.) 1956-1966
3 56 Readings notebook 1930s
3 57 Reform Judaism - Correspondence 1984-1988
3 58 Reform Judaism - Jugendgemeinschaft der Jüdischen Reformgemeinde undated, 1928, 1929
3 59 Reform Judaism - Newsletters 1928, 1930, 1933
3 60 Reform Judaism - Pamphlets 1930
3 61 Reform Judaism - Prayer books undated
3 62 Reform Judaism - Sermons of Joseph Lehmann 1926, 1932
3 63 Reform Judaism - Speech at the 2nd World Union for Progressive Judaism, London 1930
3 64 Staatliche Augusta-Schule zu Berlin - Annual reports 1927-1930
3 65 Staatliche Augusta-Schule zu Berlin - Class reunion 1962
3 66 Staatliche Augusta-Schule zu Berlin - Mock bulletin 1928, 1931
3 67 Staatliche Augusta-Schule zu Berlin - School reports 1918-1931
3 68 Staatliche Augusta-Schule zu Berlin - School essays 1930-1931
3 69 Woodbrooke settlement 1931
3 70 Woodbrooke settlement - Program of lectures 1931
3 71 Various 1932-1966

Subseries B: Correspondence,  1928-1979.

This subseries is in German and English.
0.9 linear feet
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by last name of the correspondent.

Scope and Content:

The correspondence of Hilde Lachmann-Mosse contains both letters from and to her family and letters written to or from her colleagues. The letters from her father span from 1931, when she left Berlin for her studies, to 1944 when Hans Lachmann-Mosse died. Hilde L. Mosse continued to correspond with his second wife Karola, who ran a home for children in Lafayette, California after her father's death as well.

The letters from Rudolf L. Mosse span from 1930 through 1958 when he died. They include letters from his military service in the U.S. Army, several newspaper clippings, and correspondence with the U.S. Consular officials in Switzerland, where Rudolf Lachmann-Mosse lived with his mother Felicia Lachmann-Mosse before they emigrated to the United States in 1940. The exchange with her niece, Joy Mosse, the daughter of Rudolf Lachmann-Mosse, is comprised of newspaper clippings and letters.

The correspondence with her younger brother George L. Mosse also includes his letters to their mother Felicia Lachmann-Mosse from 1972. Besides the letters from her family, the correspondence with other relatives, i.e. Ellen Mankiewitz, Olga Staadecker, Werner Mosse, and her step-brother Karl Strauch is also included.

The other part of her correspondence are letters from colleagues and friends, in general almost exclusively personal. One folder, originally titled Danny, probably contains letters to Clesbie Daniels, her close friend. Other correspondents are friends from pre-war Germany, even classmates from the August-Schule, i.e. Ursula Amann and possibly Carla Schlichting. Henrietta Bender neé Wicher, who married the para-psychologist and former professor of the University of Strasbourg, Hans Bender, was Hilde Lachmann Mosse's friend from the 1930s. Hilde Lachmann-Mosse, however, refused to renew their friendship after the war due to what she perceived as a questionable conduct of Hans Bender in the years 1933-1945.

Most of Hilde Lachmann Mosse's friends lived in Soviet-occupied territory that later became the German Democratic Republic. Correspondence with Tabita Petran, Carla Schlichting, and particularly Georg F. Alexan who wrote propagandistic articles for the GDR press discloses some of Hilde Lachmann Mosse's political convictions. The war in Vietnam, the presidential elections, the situation in Israel and the fate of Palestinian refugees were openly discussed in her letters to and from Tabita Petran. Unsurprisingly, in letters from East Berlin similar openness is missing.

a) Family

Box Folder Title Date
4 1 Lachmann, Hedwig 1932, 1934, 1937
4 2 Lachmann-Mosse, Felicia 1928, 1937-1941
4 3 Lachmann-Mosse, Felicia and Hans 1934-1938
4 4 Lachmann-Mosse, Karola and Hans 1940-1972
4 5 Lachmann-Mosse, Hans 1931-1944
4 6 Lachmann-Mosse, Rudolf 1930-1958
4 7 Mosse, George L. 1932-1972, 1977
4 8 Mosse, Joy 1960-1969
4 9 Mosse, Joy 1970-1979
4 10 Strauch, Karola 1934-1939

b) Friends and colleagues

Box Folder Title Date
4 11 ?, Ilse 1928-1929
4 12 ?, Jo (Basel, Switzerland, Kasbach bei Linz, Austria; Saarbrücken, Germany; Bonn, Germany) undated, 1933-1934
4 13 Adler, Kurt (Kiev, Soviet Union; Staligrad, Soviet Union) 1935, 1936
4 14 Alexan, Georg F. and Schlichting, Carla (Berlin, Germany) 1964-1977
4 15 Alexan Georg F. - Articles 1951-1972
4 16 Amann, Ursula (Dresden, Germany) 1966-1980
4 17 Bender-Wichert, Henrietta (Bonn, Germany; Wittenschwam, Germany) 1933-1949, 1959, 1977
4 18 Daniels, Clasbie 1954 July-Aug.
4 19 Fürth, Alice (Berlin-Charlottenburg, Germany; London, England; Kew Gardens, N.Y.) 1934, 1940, 1944
4 20 Fürth, Dora (Boothbay Harbor, Me., London, England; Paris, France) 1934, 1940-1948
4 21 Gisevius, Hans-Bernd (Berlin-Dahlem, Germany; Hamburg, Germany) 1960
4 22 Grimm, Peter (then Königsberg, Germany, now Kaliningrad, Russia) 1932-1933
4 23 Horwitz, Dora (Vlissingen, Netherlands) 1930-1931
4 24 Laqueur, Werner? 1936
4 25 Lehmann, Joseph (Berlin-Charlottenburg, Germany) 1931-1932
4 26 Lennhoff, Fritz 1932
4 27 Levy, Ludwig (Paris, France; New York, N.Y.) 1937, 1940
4 28 Lewin, Kurt (Basel, Switzerland, Paris, France) 1934
4 29 Mankiewitz, Ellen (London, England) 1971-1974
4 30 Margon, Oscar (Berlin, Germany) 1965-1976
4 31 Mosse, Werner 1936
4 32 Oliven, Hans (Genova, Italy; Berlin, Germany) undated, 1933
4 33 Petran, Tabitha (Beirut, Lebanon; Richmond upon Thames, England; London, England; Buckfield, England) 1961, 1964-1978
4 34 Renton, Edward (London, England) 1937
4 35 Rosen, Charlotte 1928
4 36 Runge, Irene and Heinrich (Berlin, Germany; Halle, Germany) and Schrader, Stefan (Berlin, Germany) 1967-1979
4 37 Scott, Erika (Berlin-Charlottenburg, Germany) 1934
4 38 Sommer, M. 1937
4 39 Staadecker, Olga F. (Glasgow, Scotland) 1972-1973
4 40 Strauch, Maria and Karl (Lexington, Mass.) 1952-1958
4 41 Thiel, Paul (Berlin, Germany) 1976
4 42 Wheeler?, Eleanor (Czechoslovakia?) 1964-1967
4 43 Wood, L. Hollingsworth (New York, N.Y.) 1938-1947
4 44 Zeller, Emilie (Berlin, Germany; Prettin, Germany) 1939-1953
4 45 Various 1932-1952

Subseries C: Audio,  1977, 1982.

This subseries is in English.
0.1 linear foot
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by folder title.

Scope and Content:

Subseries C: Audio is comprised of two audio tapes. The first records Hilde L. Mosse on the Sherrye Henry Show on February 16, 1977 on the WOR Radio. Hilde L. Mosse spoke of the relationship of violence in mass media to aggression in society. Her talk lasted approximately 21 minutes.

The other tape is a record of the memorial service after Hilde L. Mosse's death. Her brother, George L. Mosse, was the main speaker along with others, mostly colleagues.

Both tapes are in good quality.

Box Folder Title Date
4 46 Memorial service 1982 March 27
4 47 WOR broadcast program – A talk on violence and aggression 1977 February 16

Series 7: Other family members,  1866-2001.

This series is in German, English, and Polish.
0.4 linear foot
Arrangement:

Arranged topically.

Scope and Content:

Series 7: Other family members, contains documents relevant either to the family as a whole or to those family members whose papers are scarce or not in substantial amount. The documents serving for restitution of the family property, a topic frequently occurring in family correspondence, were filed in this series, together with several artistic creations that were commissioned either by Rudolf Mosse or his son-in-law Hans Lachmann-Mosse. A study by Piotr Bartkowiak that analyzes the Rudolf Mosse Foundation can also be found here.

The papers of Martha Mosse, part of this series, can be found here. Her papers contain personal testimonies and affidavits testifying her unquestionable conduct during the Nazi-period in German and later in the concentration camp Terezín/Teresienstadt. Two of her accounts reflect the situation at that time. There is correspondence with her sister Dora Panofsky as well.

Series 7 contains various photocopies, correspondence, and newspaper clippings, and photographs. Documents found their way into the Leo Baeck Institute Archives in various ways at different times, usually as addenda, but sometimes their provenance is not well documented.

Subseries A: General,  undated, 1931-2001.

The subseries is in German, English, and Polish.
0.2 linear feet
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by folder title.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains material related to the Mosse family as a whole or to several family members. Restitutions are the prominent topic of this part of the collection. It contains a letter from George L. Mosse to the embassy of the Soviet Union, inquiring about the destiny of the property once in the possession of the Mosse family and now under Soviet administration. The folder labeled Dyrotz and Schenkendorf holds various materials, mostly newspaper clippings, on two real estate properties that were owned before the Second World War by the family. Other material depicts the history of the family, usually dating back to the patriarch of the family, Marcus Mosse. Among these material is also a copy from the antisemitic encyclopedia Sigilla veri. O. Neumann's article Rudolf Mosse's Ahnen was published in Jüdische Familien- Forschung in 1935.

Several other documents refer to the artifacts owned and commissioned by Rudolf Mosse, i.e. the fountain titled The Three Dancing Maidens by Werner Shott and the canvas Das Gastmahl der Familie Mosse by Anton von Werner. Material on the tomb of Rudolf Mosse documents projected preservation work on the family grave at the Weissensee Jewish Cemetery, Berlin, Germany.

Box Folder Title Date
5 1 Correspondence 1934-1969
5 2 Dyrotz undated
5 3 Family history 1932, 1935?
5 4 Family history - Sigilla veri 1931
5 5 Fundacje Rudolfa Mossego [Rudolf Mosse Foundation] 2001
5 6 Mosse Zentrum (Berlin, Germany) - Newspaper clippings 19461992-1994
5 7 Newspaper clippings undated, 1933, 1959
5 8 Photos undated, 1891-1938
5 9 Restitutions - Drexler, William Paul 1948-1949
5 10 Restitutions - Embassy of the Soviet Union (Washington, D.C.) 1945
5 11 Restitutions - Emilie Mosse inheritance 1955-1956
5 12 Restitutions - Firma Rudolf Mosse OHG 1956-1958
5 13 Restitutions - Leighton (Levy), Ludwig 1946-1954
5 14 Restitutions - WOGA - Deutsche Revisions- und Treuhand A.G. report 1955
5 15 Schenkendorf 1987-1994
5 16 Shott, Werner - The Three Dancing Maidens fountain 1936-1994
5 17 Tomb of Family Rudolf Mosse (Ehrengrabmal Rudolf Mosse) 1999
5 18 Werner, Anton von: Das Gastmahl der Familie Mosse [The Supper of the Mosse Family] undated

Subseries B: Individual members,  1866-1993.

This subseries is in German and English.
0.2 linear foot
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by last name.

Scope and Content:

The Mosse family was an extended family and due to its prominence interest in the family history is understandable. This subseries contains material on family members that are not part of the family line of Marcus Mosse - Rudolf Mosse, which constitutes the centerpiece of this collection, but are offspring of Rudolf Mosse's brothers Albert and Emile Mosse. The material, however, does not exceed several folders and is often rather incidental.

Documents related to Martha Mosse, one of the daughters of Albert Mosse, can be of particular interest to researchers. Martha Mosse worked for the Prussian Police before 1933, but was released after the Gesetz zur Wiederherstellung des Berufsbeamtentums (Civil Service Law) was enacted on April 1933. She then worked for the Berlin Jewish community. After her transport to the concentration camp Terezín/Teresienstadt, she was involved with the camp's police force. This engagement caused accusations of collaboration with the Nazis. One of the folders contains several testimonies and affidavits in her favor, rejecting those recriminations. Besides these accounts, the subseries also contains two reports Martha Mosse wrote. One of them deals with the life of the Berlin Jewish community and the other one with the conditions in the camp Terezín/Teresienstadt. Martha Mosse's correspondence to her sister Dora Panofsky provides a first hand documentary about the situation in the concentration camp and about post-war integration into the German society.

Theodor Wolff was for a long time the editor-in-chief of the Berliner Tageblatt, but he was also a cousin of Rudolf Mosse. The newspaper clippings in this collection, however, relate to his function as an editor-in-chief and his cultural and journalistic activity.

Box Folder Title Date
5 19 Biographical interviews - Mosse, Dora and Witton, Hedwig undated
5 20 Mosse, Emile 1910-1911
5 21 Mosse, Emilie - Autograph book 1866-1882
5 22 Mosse, Emilie - Portrait undated
5 23 Mosse, Martha - Affidavits and letters of support 1945-1968
5 24 Mosse, Martha - Letters to Panofsky, Dora 1916-1977
5 25 Mosse, Martha - Reports on the Berlin Jewish community 1934-1943 and concentration camp Terezin/Theresienstadt 1945, 1958
5 26 Mosse, Salomon - Testament 1903
5 27 Mosse, Ulrike - Trauerrede 1888
5 28 Wolf, Theodor 1936, 1968,1993
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Subgroup II: Rudolf Mosse (Firm), 1896-1960.

The subgroup is in German, French, and English.
3.6 linear feet
Arrangement:

The Berlin central office of the Rudolf Mosse company material is arranged as the first series, then the individual branches follow, and after those other related businesses.

Scope and Content:

The end of the 1920s proved to be a difficult time for the Rudolf Mosse concern. The economic crisis caused by the changed economic and political conditions in Germany after the First World War and then later by the economic depression were even more aggravated by political pressures after 1933. The most prominent feature of this part of the collection is its focus on securing the further existence of the Rudolf Mosse enterprise. The most conducive part of these activities was carried out by the director of the branch in Zürich, Switzerland, Alfred Schwabacher. He ensured several loans and credits to the Rudolf Mosse branches and the Berlin central office and supervised many of the activities in other company divisions in Europe. After 1933, when the family Lachmann-Mosse lost its influence over the German core of its firm, the branch in Zürich took over most of its obligations.

The companies Orbis and Treuga served as a vehicle for managing various financial and fiscal transactions of the Rudolf Mosse company abroad. They were instrumental in ensuring loans, redistributions, and securing company assets abroad.

After the Second World War the heirs of Rudolf Mosse and Hans Lachmann-Mosse attempted to restart the broken tradition of the family business in 1953 in Munich, founding Rudolf Mosse GmbH. Despite some initial success the whole undertaking did not prove viable and the company was closed in 1960.

This subgroup contains mostly correspondence between the central office in Berlin or the Zürich branch and other divisions, alter also correspondence with various legal representatives. Contacts, calculations, receipts, annual reports, and audits can also be found here.

Series 1: Berlin - Central office,  1909-1977.

The series is in German and French.
1.1 linear feet
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by subseries title.

Scope and Content:

The main focus of this series is the effort of the management in the Berlin central office to manage the concern under the difficult economic and gradually also political conditions. It contains material on ensuring loans from various bank institutions, redistributions, and securing of company assets abroad. Several folders hold communication between the central office and local branches throughout Europe.

One of the subseries contains publications either published by companies involved in the publishing industry or describing the nature of business of the Rudolf Mosse company, including a commemorative print published in 1917 on the 50th anniversary of the Rudolf Mosse advertisement agency Festschrift zur Feier des fünfzigjährigen Bestehens der Annoncen-Expedition Rudolf Mosse.

Subseries A: General,  undated, 1928?-1977.

This subseries is in German and English.
0.2 linear foot
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by folder title.

Scope and Content:

Subseries contains several articles on various buildings owned by the Rudolf Mosse company, some of them designed by Erich Mendelsohn, one of the most distinguished German architects of his time. Images of the edifices of the various Rudolf Mosse branches can also be found here. Documents related to the transfer of the company records from a safe in Switzerland to the United States initiated by Rudolf Lachmann-Mosse are also part of this subseries.

Box Folder Title Date
5 29 Company buildings and architecture undated, 1928?, 1977
5 30 Correspondence - Various 1958- 1960
5 31 Legal register of real estate - Berlin 1932
5 32 Legal register of real estate - Cologne (Köln, Germany) 1931
5 33 Newspaper clippings - Rudolf Mosse (Firm) 1919-1971
5 34 Photos undated, 1919, 1923
5 35 Profits 1926-1930
5 36 Records - Transfer 1954, 1958

Subseries B: Loans,  1929-1934.

This subseries is in German.
0.3 linear foot
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by folder title.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains material relating to efforts to solve the difficult economic situation of the Rudolf Mosse firm. The director of the Zürich office, Alfred Schwabacher, was a key person in ensuring credits and loans from Swiss financial institutions.

Box Folder Title Date
5 37 Bankhaus Blankart - "Zürcher Kredit" - Correspondence 1929-1931
5 38 Bankhaus Blankart - "Zürcher Kredit" - Debt under a bill 1931-1933
5 39 Brettauer and Company 1931-1932
5 40 Brettauer and Company 1933
5 41 Brettauer and Company - Contracts 1931-1932
5 42 Risk agreement (Risiko-Vertrag) - Orbis 1929-1934
5 43 Schweizerischer Bankverein 1929-1931
5 44 Schweizerische Bankverein - Correspondence 1929-1932

Subseries C: Operations abroad,  1923-1938.

This subseries is in German and French.
0.4 linear foot
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by country.

Scope and Content:

This subseries documents the wide geographic range of activities of the Rudolf Mosse company. The concern stretched from Barcelona, Spain to several offices in Yugoslavia and other Central European branches in Czechoslovakia, Austria, and Hungary. The subseries also includes documents related to the constitution of the Aktiengesellschaft der Unternehmungen Rudolf Mosse in Zürich in 1933.

Box Folder Title Date
5 45 Austria 1935, 1938
5 46 Belgium undated
5 47 Czechoslovakia 1932, 1933
5 48 France - Agence de publicité de l'Europe Central (Paris) 1928
5 49 France - Agence de publicité de l'Europe Central (Paris) 1933-1938
5 50 France - Agence de publicité de l'Europe Central (Paris) - Loans 1932
5 51 France - Office international de publicité (Paris) 1923-1936
5 52 France - Office international de publicité (Paris) - Foundation 1933
Box Folder Title Date
6 1 Italy - Società Italiana edizioni e publicita Rudolf Mosse (Milan) 1924-1928
6 2 Netherlands 1923-1938
6 3 Netherlands - Deposit 1933, 1937
6 4 Spain 1924-1929
6 5 Switzerland - Aktiengesellschaft der Unternehmungen Rudolf Mosse in Zürich- Constituting records 1928-1935
6 6 Switzerland - Bern - Balance sheets 1930-1932
6 7 United States 1939
6 8 Yugoslavia - Beograd 1924, 1928-1931
6 9 Yugoslavia - Zagreb 1931-1933

Subseries D: Publications,  1901-1927.

This subseries is in German.
0.2 linear foot
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by folder title.

Scope and Content:

The subseries contains commemorative publications of various establishments involved in the publishing industry, partly printing houses, partly newspaper publishers. Several publications on the Rudolf Mosse firm are also to be found in this subseries, as well as two pamphlets printed on the occasion of Arthur Levysohn's 25th anniversary at the company. Arthur Levysohn was the editor-in-chief of the Berliner Tageblatt . The folder labeled "Publications – Printed by Rudolf Mosse printing house," contains a list of publications that were presented to Rudolf Mosse in 1917 on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the firm Annoncen-Expedition Rudolf Mosse. The copies of these books were removed to the Leo Baeck Institute Library and are available on microfiche.

Box Folder Title Date
6 10 Buchhandlung und Zeitungsbureau Hermann Goldschmiedt - Commemorative print 1927
6 11 Echo der Gegenwart; Tilsiter Zeitung; Werner Siemens - Commemorative prints 1909, 1916
6 12 Festschrift zur Feier des fünfzigjährigen Bestehens der Annoncen-Expedition Rudolf Mosse – 50th anniversary 1917
6 13 Fischart, Johannes (Erich Dombrowski): Köpfe der Gegenwart. Berlin 1920: Oesterheld and Co. 1920
6 14 Hamburger, Richard: Zeitungsverlag und Annoncen-Expedition Rudolf Mosse Berlin. Berlin [s.d.]: Organisations Verlagsgesellschaft m.b.H, [75 p.] undated
6 15 Haus Berchtold - Commemorative print 1921
6 16 Levysohn, Arthur - Anniversary print 1901
6 17 Publications - Printed by Rudolf Mosse printing house 1917
6 18 Rationalisierung des Verkaufs und der Reklame [Rationalization of Sales and Advertisement] undated

Series 2: Basel,  1917-1932.

The series is in German.
0.3 linear foot
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by folder title.

Scope and Content:

Balance sheets, correspondence, and tax declarations together with tax instructions for both the canton of Basel-City (Basel-Stadt) and the Swiss Confederation are part of this series.

Box Folder Title Date
6 19 Balance sheets 1917-1920
6 20 Balance sheets 1921-1923
6 21 Balance sheets 1924-1926
6 22 Balance sheets 1927-1928
6 23 Balance sheets 1929-1932
6 24 Correspondence - Wöhrle, Karl 1918-1930
6 25 Taxes - Declarations and forms 1917-1929

Series 3: Zürich,  1896-1933, 1957.

The series is in German .
1.2 linear foot
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by folder title.

Scope and Content:

The Zürich branch of the Rudolf Mosse enterprise was the biggest branch outside of Germany. Its significance grew even more after the Lachmann-Mosse family lost control over its property in Germany almost immediately after the NSDAP take-over in Germany in 1933. The director of the Zürich branch was Alfred Schwabacher, who also coordinated other operations throughout Europe and was instrumental in attempts to secure some financial assets of the Rudolf Mosse firm. He was also involved in the activities of Treuga Holding A.G.. In the crisis of the Rudolf Mosse firm it was the branch in Zürich that took over most of the obligations of the central office in Berlin.

The series consists of bank account records, balance sheets documenting the period 1905 through 1932, contracts, and correspondence with the central office in Berlin that provides insight into some aspects of the functioning of the Rudolf Mosse enterprise.

Box Folder Title Date
6 26 Balance sheets 1905-1906
6 27 Balance sheets 1907-1908
6 28 Balance sheets 1909-1910
6 29 Balance sheets 1911
6 30 Balance sheets 1912-1913
Box Folder Title Date
7 1 Balance sheets 1914-1915
7 2 Balance sheets 1916
7 3 Balance sheets 1917
7 4 Balance sheets 1919-1922
7 5 Balance sheets 1923-1926
7 6 Balance sheets 1927-1929
7 7 Balance sheets 1930
7 8 Balance sheets 1931
7 9 Balance sheets 1932
7 10 Bank statements - Schweizerischer Bankverein 1920-1923
7 11 Bank statements - Schweizerischer Bankverein 1924-1926
7 12 Bank statements - Schweizerischer Bankverein 1930
7 13 Calculation notes undated, 1929-1931
7 14 Contract - Pension (Annuity) for Hans and Felicia Lachmann-Mosse 1929-1933
7 15 Contract - Rudolf Mosse (Berlin, Germany) and Aktiengesellschaft der Unternehmungen Rudolf Mosse in Zürich (Switzerland) 1928
7 16 Contract - Rudolf Mosse (Berlin, Germany) and Orbis (Vaduz, Liechtenstein);
Rudolf Mosse Branches and Orbis (Vaduz, Liechtenstein)
1928
7 17 Contracts and protocols
Aktiengesellschaft der Unternehmungen Rudolf Mosse in Zürich (Switzerland);
Treuga Holding S.A. (Vaduz, Liechtenstein);
Schweizerische Bankgesellschaft (Zürich, Switzerland)
1925, 1928, 1932
7 18 Correspondence - Central office Berlin 1896
7 19 Correspondence - Central office Berlin 1897
7 20 Correspondence - Central office Berlin 1898
7 21 Correspondence - Central office Berlin 1899
7 22 Correspondence - Central office Berlin 1900
7 23 Correspondence - Central office Berlin 1901
7 24 Correspondence - Central office Berlin 1902
7 25 Correspondence - Central office Berlin 1903
7 26 Correspondence - Central office Berlin 1904
7 27 Correspondence - Central office Berlin 1905
7 28 Correspondence - Central office Berlin 1906
7 29 Correspondence - Central office Berlin 1907-1908
7 30 Correspondence - Central office Berlin 1923-1924
7 31 Correspondence - Central office Berlin 1932
7 32 Correspondence - Central office Berlin - Accounting 1927-1931
7 33 Correspondence - Central office Berlin - Operations 1923-1932
7 34 Memoranda - Redistribution of profit 1912, 1926-1927
7 35 Newspaper clippings 1930-1933, 1957
7 36 Record of personnel before 1911
7 37 Schwabacher, Alfred - Anniversary Publications - 1926
7 38 Tax laws - Switzerland, Germany 1917, 1922, 1923

Series 4: Orbis Finanzierungs- und Garantiegesellschaft für Verlags und Publizitätsunternehmungen (Vaduz, Liechtenstein),  1928-1939.

The series is in German, French, and English.
0.4 linear foot
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by folder title.

Scope and Content:

The company Orbis served as a vehicle for various financial and fiscal transaction of the Rudolf Mosse company abroad. Its main purpose was to financially secure the various enterprises of the Rudolf Mosse business group. Later on, this company also carried some of the payments to the former employees of the Rudolf Mosse firm and provided some financial means for the family of Hans Lachmann-Mosse after they left Germany.

The series includes bank statements, account journals, some correspondence pertaining to transfers and deposits of various commodities, protocols of the stock-holders' meetings, and copies of contracts between various Rudolf Mosse branches and Orbis.

Box Folder Title Date
8 1 Bank account - Schweizerische Bankverein 1935-1939
8 2 Bank account - National City Bank of New York 1936-1938
8 3 Company foundation 1928-1929
8 4 Contractual money transfers to Orbis 1929-1934
8 5 Correspondence 1929-1939
8 6 Credit - Agence belge de publicité (ABEPEC) 1934-1935
8 7 Credit - Agence central de publicité pour l'Europe 1934-1938
8 8 Deposit - Gold - Midland Bank Ltd. 1933-1936
8 9 Deposit - Gold - Zürcher Kantonalbank 1933
8 10 Deposit - Gold - Schweizerischer Bankverein 1933-1935
8 11 Deposit - Gold - Credit in favor of Agence belge de publicité 1935
8 12 Deposit - Securities - Correspondence and statements 1932-1938
8 13 Deposit - Securities - National City Bank of New York 1936-1938
8 14 Loan to Office international de publicité (Paris, France) 1933-1936
8 15 Payments - Pension fund 1933
8 16 Payments - Wolff, Theodor - Severance payment 1933-1934
8 17 Payments - Various 1933
8 18 Tax laws - United States 1936
8 19 Transfers - Various commodities 1929, 1938-1939

Series 5: Treuga Holding- Aktiengesellschaft (Glarus, Switzerland),  1923-1939.

The series is in German.
0.2 linear foot
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by folder title.

Scope and Content:

Treuga Holding was founded in Glarus, Switzerland in order to manage and administer the activities of the Rudolf Mosse company in other commercial activities. The series contains correspondence, financial journals, and protocols of the stock holders' assembly with related correspondence.

Box Folder Title Date
8 20 General 1926-1931
8 21 Company foundation 1923
8 22 Journals 1923-1928
8 23 Protocols of Stock-holders' assembly and related correspondence 1925-1939

Series 6: Rudolf Mosse GmbH,  1953-1960.

The series is inGerman and English.
0.4 linear foot
Arrangement:

Arranged alphabetically by folder title.

Scope and Content:

The heirs of Rudolf Mosse and Hans Lachmann-Mosse attempted to revitalize the family business in 1953 in Munich when the Rudolf Mosse GmbH was founded. The new company was to capitalize on the rights of the Rudolf Mosse company that the heirs owned, among them the rights to the books published by the Rudolf Mosse company, a Mosse Code and the Address book (Reichs-Adressbuch). Even though the renewed publication of the address book had some success, the company folded in 1960.

This series contains mostly correspondence between the Mosse heirs and their lawyers, mostly Carl Herrmann, Richard O. Graw, and Leonard Leighton. The copy of the initial contract can also be found here, as well as the newspaper clippings announcing the end of this business undertaking. The folder labeled "Restitutions" contains a short pre-history of the Rudolf Mosse GmbH after the Second World War.

Box Folder Title Date
8 24 Company founding 1953
8 25 Correspondence 1954
8 26 Correspondence 1955
8 27 Correspondence 1956
8 28 Correspondence 1957
8 29 Correspondence 1958-1959
8 30 Correspondence 1960
8 31 Monthly payments 1954-1960
8 32 Newspaper clippings 1960
8 33 Public relations packet 1954
8 34 Restitutions 1955-1957
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