Guide to the Papers of Hugo Knoepfmacher (1890-1980)
1865-1979

AR 7172 / MF 957

Processed by Rebekka Rueegsegger

Leo Baeck Institute

Center for Jewish History

15 West 16th Street

New York, N.Y. 10011

Phone: (212) 744-6400

Fax: (212) 988-1305

Email: http://www.lbi.org/ask

URL: http://www.lbi.org

© 2008 Leo Baeck Institute. All rights reserved.
Center for Jewish History, Publisher.
Electronic finding aid was encoded in EAD 2002 by Dianne Ritchey Oummia in June 2008. Description is in English.
February 2009. Microfilm inventory added.

Descriptive Summary

Creator: Knoepfmacher, Hugo, 1890-1980
Title: Hugo Knoepfmacher Collection
Dates:1865-1979
Dates:bulk 1920-1979
Abstract: This collection holds the papers of the lawyer and librarian Hugo Knoepfmacher. The main subject of the collection is his personal and professional life, although material concerning other members of the family is also present. The collection consists of official documents, notes, correspondence, manuscripts, some clippings, and a very small amount of published material.
Languages: The collection is primarily in German and English, with some French, Hebrew, Yiddish, Russian, Chinese, and Mongolian.
Quantity: 1.75 feet + 1 oversized folder
Identification: AR 7172
Repository: Leo Baeck Institute
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Biographical Note

Hugo Knoepfmacher was born on June 1st, 1890 in Vienna, the son of Dr. Wilhelm Knoepfmacher and his wife Selma (née Grabower). Wilhelm was a successful attorney, an active member of the Jewish community, and a childhood friend of Sigmund Freud. Hugo had a younger sister, Hedwig. He attended the Erzherzog Rainer-Gymnasium in Vienna before studying law at the University of Vienna. During World War I he had to interrupt his studies in order to serve as a soldier for Austria. In 1916, Knoepfmacher was taken prisoner by the Russians and sent to a war prison camp in Siberia. There he met Hans Kohn, the future historian of nationalism, and started what became a life-long friendship. Together with a group of other Jewish prisoners Knoepfmacher and Kohn began to study Hebrew, translate Hebrew poetry, and form a Zionist group. Even after the end of the war, the prisoners of war were trapped in Siberia by the Russian Revolution and ensuing Civil War. Knoepfmacher eventually escaped in 1920, via Outer Mongolia and China. When he returned to Vienna he took up his legal studies again, receiving his doctoral degree in 1921.

Beginning in 1924, Knoepfmacher practiced law in Vienna in the office of his father until the Nazi occupation of Austria (1938). In 1936 he married Juliana Swarowsky (née Laszky), who already had a son, Anton Swarowsky, from her first marriage to Johann Swarowsky. Hugo and Juliana left Vienna in 1939 and went first to Oxford and London, and shortly thereafter to the United States, where they took up residence in New York City. After some initial difficulties, they both succeeded in establishing themselves professionally. Juliana Knoepfmacher became a psychoanalytic therapist; Hugo Knoepfmacher, after studying library science, held several positions as a librarian with the New York Public Library and the United Nations, finally obtaining a position as research analyst with the Central Intelligence Agency in Washington, working there from 1952 until his retirement in 1964. In 1974, the year of the death of his wife, he went back to New York City.

During the 1950s and 1960s Hugo Knoepfmacher wrote a respectable amount of unpublished essays examining the political and historical developments after World War II. He continued his activity as a writer in his retirement, when he did some research, writing, and consulting work for the Historical Evaluation and Research Organization of McLean, Virginia, and worked with several scholarly projects, including encyclopedia entries for Encyclopaedia Judaica and the Oesterreichisches Biographisches Lexikon.

Hugo Knoepfmacher died in New York City on May 6, 1980.

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Scope and Content Note

This collection documents the personal and professional life of the lawyer and librarian Hugo Knoepfmacher. Among the papers in the collection are personal and official papers, correspondence, manuscripts, and a small amount of clippings and published material.

Documents stating Hugo Knoepfmacher's personal experiences and providing biographical information on him will be found mainly in Series I, which holds Knoepfmacher's personal papers, such as educational, emigration, immigration, identification and other official or government-issued documents, personal notes from various periods of his life, some correspondence, clippings, and material relating to his World War I and prison camp experiences. Other biographical data or information about Knoepfmacher's personal experiences can be extracted from his personal correspondence with family members and friends, which is represented in Series III. Knoepfmacher's restitution claims, which also recount the course of his emigration to the U.S., are located in Series IV, Subseries 1.

Papers that focus on the professional life of Hugo Knoepfmacher are located in two different areas of this collection. Series I holds professional documents from Austria and the U.S. The Austrian papers document the time from his first steps as a lawyer until his ban from profession by the Nazis, including references from Viennese lawyers, some correspondence, and business records. The U.S. papers concern Knoepfmacher's professional restart as a librarian, including correspondence with employers, job offers, appointments, and certificates from the C.I.A. The professional correspondence in Series III originates also from the period of Knoepfmacher's emigration. It is of particular interest, since it contains many letters of Hans Kohn exercising his influence on his friend's behalf and recommending him for various professional positions in the U.S. Other more personal correspondence with Hans Kohn documenting the life-long friendship will be found in the personal section of Series III. In contrast, Knoepfmacher's collected material on Hans Kohn resides in Series VII, consisting of as articles and reviews concerning the historian's work, course outlines, published essays of Kohn, and Knoepfmacher's recollections of his encounter with Kohn.

Hugo Knoepfmacher's manuscripts are represented in Series V; the ones on Freud in Subseries 1 are based on family memories and provide a few interesting details about Freud's schooldays and his membership in the Jewish association B'nai B'rith. The essays on historical and political developments after 1945, such as the Soviet occupation of Austria, the policy of the Soviet Union, and the ideology of communism in general, will be found in Subseries 2 and Subseries 3. Series VI holds Knoepfmacher's published texts, including encyclopedia entries, articles, reviews and specialized texts. The manuscripts of Knoepfmacher's translations of Saul Tschernichowski's and Gershon Shofman's Hebrew poetry are located in Series VIII.

In addition to papers to Hugo Knoepfmacher, this collection also holds documents pertaining to his family members. These will be found in Series II, which holds papers of his wife Juliana Knoepfmacher, his father Wilhelm Knoepfmacher, and the family of his sister Hedwig Stern. Most documents here are official documents, such as certificates of birth, residence, military service, marriage, and death. The documents of Juliana Knoepfmacher contain also papers from the period of her first marriage to Johann Swarowsky, including judicial papers concerning their divorce. Other documents relating to family members will be found in the family correspondence of Series III, which also contains letters of Juliana's brother Wolf Laszky. Documents pertaining to Hedwig Stern's restitution claims will be found in Series IV, Subseries 2, while the poems she wrote for her brother Hugo are located in Series I.

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Arrangement

This collection is comprised of eight series:

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Access and Use

Access Restrictions

Open to researchers.

Access Information

Readers may access the collection by visiting the Lillian Goldman Reading Room at the Center for Jewish History. We recommend reserving the collection in advance; please visit the LBI Online Catalog and click on the "Request" button.

Use Restrictions

There may be some restrictions on the use of the collection. For more information, contact:
Leo Baeck Institute, Center for Jewish History, 15 West 16th Street, New York, NY 10011
email: lbaeck@lbi.cjh.org

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Access Points

Click on a subject to search that term in the Center's catalog. Return to the Top of Page

Separated Material

Two letters from Heimito von Doderer were removed to the LBI's Autograph Collection.

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Microfilm

The collection is on four reels of microfilm (MF 957):

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Preferred Citation

Published citations should take the following form:

Identification of item, date (if known); Hugo Knoepfmacher Collection; AR 7172; box number; folder number; Leo Baeck Institute.

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Processing Information

The arrangement of this collection reflects basically the original order created by Hugo Knoepfmacher. No material was moved to another area of the collection, but similar materials were grouped together in order to form series and subseries.

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Container List

 

Series I: Personal Papers, 1890-1970

This series is in German, English, and Russian, with some Hebrew, Chinese, Mongolian, and Latin.
0.3 linear foot + 2 oversized folders.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

This series holds the personal documents of Hugo Knoepfmacher, including educational, official, and professional papers, as well as several folders with notes from different periods of his life and various materials concerning his experiences as a soldier and prisoner of War in World War I.

Knoepfmacher's educational documents are divided into papers from Austria and papers from the United States. The Austrian educational documents comprise graduation certificates from high school and university, including his doctorate diploma in law from the University of Vienna in the oversized folder. The U.S. educational documents hold certificates from Columbia University, New York, where Knoepfmacher received his second degree as a librarian.

The majority of Hugo Knoepfmacher's notes are written in Gabelsberger shorthand. Remarkable are the notebooks dating from his stay in the prison camp in Siberia with Hans Kohn. These records include translations of Hebrew poems from Gershon Shofman and Saul Tschernichowski, Hebrew vocabularies, Hebrew notes, and a Cyrillic alphabet. A huge amount of typed translations of Hebrew poems will be found in Series VIII.

The official documents consist of birth, residence, military, marriage, vaccination certificates and identification papers, including a Hebrew marriage contract, called a Ketubah. Notarized and certified English translations of several of these official documents, including papers of Knoepfmacher's wife Juliana, can be found among the emigration and immigration papers. Other personal and official documents of Juliana Knoepfmacher will be found in Series II.

The folders entitled Professional Documents hold correspondence with and references from employers in Austria, where Knoepfmacher gained his first practical experience while studying. Moreover these papers include business records from the time when he took over his father's law office to his ban from profession in 1938. Some of the materials documenting Knoepfmacher's professional career in the U.S.A., such as correspondence with the Columbia University, the United Nations, the Library of Congress and the Central Intelligence Agency concerning applications, job offers, and appointments, can also be found in this area of the collection. Other documents concerning Knoepfmacher's professional recommencement in the United States are located in Series III: Correspondence, Folder Professional - Emigration and Employment.

Moreover, Series I contains material about Knoepfmacher's experiences during and after World War I, including his capture by the Russians, and his escape towards the east, leading him to Mongolia and China. These documents consist of typed copies of letters to his family in Vienna, records about his experiences in the camp, as well as a letter from Hans Kohn, and a newspaper article by Hugo Knoepfmacher published in 1921. Additional material, such as a Chinese passport, collected issues of Russian-language Jewish newspapers from Shanghai and Irkutsk, and a poster announcing a meeting organized by a Zionist Organization in Siberia are located in the oversized folder. More extensive correspondence with Hans Kohn is located in Series III: Correspondence. A manuscript on Knoepfmacher's recollections of his encounter with Hans Kohn will be found in Series VII: Hans Kohn.

BoxFolderTitleDate
11Educational Documents - Austria1909-1921
BoxFolderTitleDate
OS 51Educational Documents - Austria - Oversized1921
BoxFolderTitleDate
12Educational Documents - U.S.1941-1949
13Notes - Biographicalcirca 1970
14Notes - English Class and Library Schoolearly 1940s?
15Notes - Vienna1920s
16Notes - War Captivity in Siberia1918-1919
17Notes - Unidentifiedundated
18Official Documents - Austria1890, 1915-1938
19Official Documents - Emigration and Immigration1924, 1938-1945
110Official Documents - U.S.1956-1970
111Poems Hedwig Stern1949-1972
112Professional Documents - Austria1923-1939
113Professional Documents - Austria - Business Records1938-1939
114Professional Documents - U.S.1942-1964
115World War I, War Captivity in Siberia, and Escape1915-1920
BoxFolderTitleDate
OS 51World War I, War Captivity in Siberia, and Escape - Oversized1920
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Series II: Other Family Members,  1865-1974

This series is in German, English, with some Yiddish and Hungarian.
0.1 linear foot.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

This series holds the papers of other family members, including Hugo Knoepfmacher's wife Juliana, his father Wilhelm, and the family of his sister Hedwig Stern.

The documents of Juliana Knoepfmacher cover not only her certificates of birth, baptism, residence, and death, but also papers from her first marriage to Johann Swarowsky, such as the couple's secession from the Catholic Church in 1921, their marriage certificate and a relatively huge amount of judicial papers concerning their divorce.

Wilhelm Knoepfmacher's correspondence contains predominantly letters from various Jewish organizations and institutions, but also includes two Yiddish letters from his father Josef Hirsch Knoepfmacher. Noteworthy among Wilhelm Knoepfmacher's personal documents are papers concerning his membership in the Jewish Organization B'nai B'rith, where he was a respected member, as documented by a memorial in 1953 by Felix Kohn, the Past President of the Austrian District of B'nai B'rith Liberty Lodge. In addition the personal documents of Wilhelm also include his certificate of residence, the certificate of death of his wife Selma, and some genealogical records.

The documents of the Stern Family comprise a birth certificate and a certificate of military service for David Stern, the husband of Hugo Knoepfmacher's sister Hedwig Stern, as well as a birth certificate of Robert Stern, David and Hedwig's son.

BoxFolderTitleDate
116Knoepfmacher, Juliana - Personal Documents1899-1974
117Knoepfmacher, Juliana - First Marriage1921-1934
118Knoepfmacher, Wilhelm - Correspondence1865?-1933
119Knoepfmacher, Wilhelm - Personal Documents1871-1953
120Stern Family - Documents1921, 1938
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Series III: Correspondence,  1923-1979

This series is in German and English, with some French.
0.2 linear foot.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

Series III: Correspondence is divided into three different types: Family, Personal, and Professional. Folders labeled Family contain Juliana Knoepfmacher's letters to her husband Hugo, the correspondence between the Knoepfmacher couple and Juliana's brother, Wolf Lasky, as well as Hedwig Stern's letters to her brother Hugo and letters to her by various correspondents. In addition, there is also a small amount of correspondence with Anton Swarowsky, Juliana's son from her first marriage.

The personal correspondence is made up of correspondence with friends and acquaintances of Hugo Knoepfmacher, including letters to and from Juliana Knoepfmacher, often addressed as Lia or Lully. Noteworthy are the letters from Hans Kohn and his wife Jetty about various personal and professional subjects, which reveal a close and lasting friendship with Hugo and Juliana Knoepfmacher. These letters deal predominantly with news from family and private everyday life, as well as Hans Kohn's work as a historian and writer. Furthermore, Knoepfmacher's personal correspondence contains several letters from organizations, where he was a member, such as B'nai B'rith and the American Society of International Law, and other primarily Jewish Institutions, such as the Bureau of Jewish Social Research, Keren Hasiod, and the Leo Baeck Institute.

Knoepfmacher's professional correspondence deals with his emigration and employment prospects in the United States, including many letters by Hans Kohn, recommending him and supporting his career as a librarian.

BoxFolderTitleDate
121Family - Knoepfmacher, Juliana1940-1969
122Family - Laszky, Wolf1942-1946, 1979
123Family - Stern, Hedwig1947-1961
124Family - Swarowsky, Antonundated
125Personal - A-Z1940-1976
126Personal - Floch, Hanns and Johanna1942-1958
127Personal - Kohn, Hans and Jetty1940-1972
128Personal - Organizations1923-1929, 1940-1972
129Personal - Zenker, Otto and Gerda1946-1974
130Personal - Unidentified1938-1946
131Professional - Emigration and Employment1938-1946
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Series IV: Restitution, 1938-1967

This series is in German and English.
0.25 linear foot.
Arrangement:

Original order.

Scope and Content:

Series IV holds documents concerning restitution claims of Hugo Knoepfmacher and his sister Hedwig Stern against Austria and Germany. Knoepfmacher sought restitution for the Austrian Dollar Bonds he and his sister had been deprived of as well as for stolen and auctioned off possessions. Both restitution cases reveal major differences between the attitudes and practices of the Austrian and West German authorities.

Subseries 1: Hugo Knoepfmacher, 1938-1967

This subseries is in German, with some English.
0.15 linear foot.
Arrangement:

Original order.

Scope and Content:

The documents pertaining to Hugo Knoepfmacher's Austrian restitution claims represent for the most part legal correspondence with the lawyers Friedrich Grohs and Rudolf Srkein from Vienna and the Restitution Commission at the Landesgericht Wien in ZRS about the Austrian Dollar Bonds. Included here are also judicial decisions made by the Restitution Commission. The German restitution documents deal with Hugo Knoepfmacher's claims about stolen furniture, personal chattels, artwork, and jewelry. Some of these objects were stolen from a storage house of the shipping company at the free-port in Hamburg, other objects of value were confiscated and auctioned off by the Nazis. These documents consist predominantly of legal correspondence with various German authorities, restitution agencies and courts. A small amount of correspondence is personal, but still addressing Knoepfmacher's restitution claims.

Knoepfmacher collected copies of records from the 1930s, bank statements, a complete inventory of possessions, correspondence with banks and governmental departments of the Nazi-regime, the shipping company, and the auction house Dorotheum in Vienna; these were supporting documents for his claims against Austria and West-Germany.

A few documents located in this subseries also include restitution claims for Knoepfmacher's sister Hedwig Stern, notably in correspondence with the Austrian Dollar Bond. The arrangement of the papers follows the original chronological order created by Hugo Knoepfmacher.

BoxFolderTitleDate
132Correspondence and Judicial Decisions - Austria1956-1964
133Correspondence and Judicial Decisions - Germany1957-1967
134Supporting Documents1938-1956

Subseries 2: Hedwig Stern, 1939-1965

This subseries is in German.
0.1 linear foot.
Arrangement:

Original order.

Scope and Content:

Subseries 2 is made up of documents concerning Hedwig Stern's restitution claims against West-Germany. Hedwig Stern sought restitution for stolen and auctioned off belongings, such as personal chattels and various artworks. The relevant papers are comprised of correspondence with German authorities, restitution agencies and courts. Moreover a considerable amount of correspondence originating from friends, galleries, antiquaries and professional appraisers is concerned with the appraisal of Hedwig Stern's most valuable possessions, such as the painting Bethaus in Brody by the Viennese artist Isidor Kaufmann and a personally dedicated copy of the first edition of Sigmund Freud's book Traumdeutung.

The supporting documents for Hedwig Stern's restitution claims are made up of correspondence with authorities of the Third Reich, receipts and bank statements, and an inventory of possessions. Hugo Knoepfmacher also included notes written in Gabelsberger shorthand.

BoxFolderTitleDate
135Correspondence and Judicial Decisions - Germany1957-1965
136Supporting Documents1938-1939, 1958-1960
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Series V: Manuscripts,  1951-1979

This series is in German and English.
0.25 linear foot.
Arrangement:

Separated into four subseries: On Sigmund Freud, Essays on the Soviet Occupation of Austria, Essays on the Soviet Union and Communism, and Other Manuscripts.

Scope and Content:

Series V holds Hugo Knoepfmacher's manuscripts. Next to two manuscripts about Sigmund Freud, Knoepfmacher's essays are predominantly about the historical and political developments after 1945 focusing on Austria and Eastern Europe. Main topics are the influence and power of the Soviet Union and the ideology of communism. The purpose of these unpublished essays analyzing political issues is unclear. Knoepfmacher might have written them for the C.I.A., but evidence pointing towards that direction is lacking. The bulk of the manuscripts are undated, but internal clues allow an approximation in most cases.

Subseries 1: On Sigmund Freud, 1952, , after 1977

This subseries is in German, with some English.
0.05 linear foot.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

The manuscripts in this subseries pertain to Hugo Knoepfmacher's memories about his father's relationship with Sigmund Freud.

Based on its features and length, one manuscript seems to be the transcript of a radio interview with Hugo Knoepfmacher, but its circumstances are not specified. It deals with the development of the friendship between Sigmund Freud and Wilhelm Knoepfmacher from their being schoolmates at the Leopoldstaedter Kommunal Real- und Obergymnasium in Vienna to their membership in the Jewish Association B'nai B'rith in Vienna until the Nazis dissolved it in 1938.

Hugo Knoepfmacher's essay "Sigmund Freud und B'nai B'rith" focuses on Freud's contribution to B'nai B'rith, namely on his lectures at several meetings about his latest research and theories. Included is a fragmentary English translation of Knoepfmacher's text as well as an English translation of a letter from Freud to the association.

BoxFolderTitleDate
137Interview with Hugo Knoepfmacher on his father's relations with Sigmund Freud1952
138Sigmund Freud und B'nai B'rithafter 1977

Subseries 2: Essays on the Soviet Occupation of Austria, 1955-1970

This subseries is in English and German.
0.1 linear foot.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

Subseries 2 holds Hugo Knoepfmacher's manuscripts on the postwar events and the Soviet occupation of Austria 1945-1955. Knoepfmacher's essays on that topic are an attempt to explain the strategic importance of Austria for the Soviet Union by analyzing the country's geographical, historical, political, and economic conditions. The manuscript Chronology of the Occupation of Austria contains two outlines of the world and Austrian events after World War II and probably represents Knoepfmacher's preliminary work for the essays in this subseries.

A slightly different focus may be found Knoepfmacher's typed notes regarding a chapter of the book Zwischen Demokratie und Volksdemokratie (1950) by the Austrian Social Democratic politician Adolf Schaerf. These notes concern the domestic attempt in occupied Austria to re-establish the political organizations in 1945 and debate the mix of cooperation and rivalry in the relationship between the Communist and the Social Democratic Party in 1945.

BoxFolderTitleDate
139Chronology of the Occupation of Austria 1945-1955after 1955
140A Historical Introductionafter 1955
141Zwischen Demokratie und Volksdemokratie - Knoepfmacher's notes on Adolf Schaerf's textafter 1950
142Soviet Economic Exploitation of Austria during the Occupation 1945-1955after 1966
143Soviet Objectives in Austriaundated

Subseries 3: Essays on Communism and the Soviet Union, 1951-1973

This subseries is in English and German.
0.05 linear foot.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

Subseries 3 is comprised of essays and related material dealing with the Soviet Union and the ideology of communism in general.

The first folder holds Knoepfmacher's preliminary material for the most labor-intensive, but not finished project in this subseries, an essay for a potential book by Thomas Lucey on Major General Reinhold Gehlen, the Nazi spy who was later appointed to be the manager of an American-sponsored secret agency in Germany to conduct espionage against Communism and the Soviet Union. In addition, this folder also contains correspondence with Thomas Lucey and the Historical Evaluation and Research Organization in McLean, Virginia; the essay The political struggle during the war in the east and its underestimation by German leaders by Sven Doellerdt; as well as a newspaper article concerning Gehlen.

Knoepfmacher's juristic, philosophical and historical surveys of communism are located in the two following folders. The brief treatise The Premises of Human Rights in Soviet Law examines the historical conditions of Russia and the philosophical premises of the Marxist ideology to explain the status of human rights in Soviet law. The essay Rosa Luxemburg, which is dedicated to the 50th anniversary of her murder in 1969, focuses on Luxemburg's life, the political and historical context and her work as a Marxist theoretician.

The remaining folder contains an essay on the embittered relations between the U.S. and Hungary after World War II and the respective U.S. foreign policy during the cold war.

BoxFolderTitleDate
144Material from the Captured German Major General Reinhold Gehlen and his Unit1969-1973
145The Premises of Human Rights in Soviet Law1969?
146Rosa Luxemburg1968-1969
147The United States and Hungary. Relations since 19451951?

Subseries 4: Other Manuscripts, undated

This subseries is in English and German.
0.05 linear foot.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

This subseries holds fragmentary manuscripts by Hugo Knoepfmacher on various subjects, such as the Russian civil war, Jewish-Arab relations, foreign currency policies, and Copernicus. Moreover there are manuscripts, notes, and fragments by Juliana Knoepfmacher concerning a psychological analysis of the fall of the Polish regime in 1956, and two manuscripts on Jewish life in Moravia by Adolf Huber.

BoxFolderTitleDate
21Fragmentary Manuscripts and Notes by Hugo Knoepfmacherundated
22Manuscripts and Notes by Juliana Knoepfmacherundated
23Manuscripts by Adolf Huberundated
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Series VI: Publications, 1924-1979

This series is in German, English, and French.
0.25 linear foot.
Arrangement:

Separated into two subseries: Encyclopedia Entries and Essays and Reviews.

Scope and Content:

Series VI holds drafts, manuscripts, copies, and some originals of Hugo Knoepfmacher's publications, as well as related correspondence. The majority of the material pertains to his work as a researcher and writer of encyclopedia entries for the Encyclopaedia Judaica and the Oesterreichisches Biographisches Lexikon. In addition, this series also contains a small amount of other published texts, such as a newspaper article, a specialized text in the field of library science, and two reviews.

Subseries 1: Encyclopedia Entries, 1969-1979

This subseries is in German, with some English.
0.2 linear foot.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

This series holds documents concerning Hugo Knoepfmacher's work for two distinguished encyclopedias, the Encyclopaedia Judaica and the Oesterreichisches Biographisches Lexikon. Knoepfmacher was responsible for researching and writing biographies of eminent Jewish personalities, in the case of Encyclopaedia Judaica also for the explanation of political and juristic terms.

The folders concerning the Oesterreichisches Biographisches Lexikon contain extensive correspondence with Eva Obermayer-Marnach from the editorial office of the Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften. These letters document Knoepfmacher's important role not only as a writer of biographies, but also as a consultant proposing and selecting individuals for entry in the encyclopedia.

BoxFolderTitleDate
24Encyclopaedia Judaica - Correspondence and Entries1969-1971
25Oesterreichisches Biographisches Lexikon - Correspondence1971-1979
26Oesterreichisches Biographisches Lexikon - Drafts for Encyclopedia Entries1970s
27Oesterreichisches Biographisches Lexikon - Yearly Reports1971-1979

Subseries 2: Essays and Reviews, 1924-1979

This subseries is in German, English, and French.
0.05 linear foot.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

This subseries contains Hugo Knoepfmacher's published texts concerning juristic subjects, Outer Mongolia, and Hebrew poetry. The article on lien and the review on German translations of Hebrew lyric were both published in Viennese newspapers before Knoepfmacher's emigration. The selection of references concerning Outer Mongolia, which contains a short description of Knoepfmacher's experiences and a bibliography on Outer Mongolia, was written for the Bulletin of the New York Public Library. Knoepfmacher's review of the French text Droit Internatinal, Privé et Public of the Bulgarian Association of International Law was published in the American Journal of International Law.

BoxFolderTitleDate
28Article - Zur Frage des Pfandrechtesbefore 1939
29Outer Mongolia. A Selection of References1944
210Review - Droit International, Privé et Public1979
211Review - Hebraeische Lyrik in neuen Uebersetzungen1924
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Series VII: Hans Kohn,  1923-1970

This series is in German and English.
0.15 linear foot.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

Series VII is comprised of collected documents concerning Hans Kohn. The majority of the material focuses on Kohn's activity as a historian and researcher. The folder Habsburg Monarchy Committee contains a list of U.S Historians interested in the history of the Habsburg Monarchy, including a relevant bibliography. The material entitled Martin Buber-Abende consists of outlines and probably transcriptions of five lectures given by Hans Kohn, while other course outlines are located in the folder New School for Social Research. Moreover, there can be found two published essays by Kohn, one on contemporary history and one on nationalism. The last folder contains a manuscript by Hugo Knoepfmacher about his encounter with Kohn in Siberia.

BoxFolderTitleDate
212Articles and Reviews concerning Hans Kohn's Work1944-1949, 1961-1966
213Correspondence to Hans Kohn1959, 1970
214Habsburg Monarchy Committee1958-1959
215Martin Buber-Abende1923
216New School for Social Research, New York1945-1947
217Published Essays by Hans Kohn1957, 1969?
218Some Recollections of my Encounter with Hans Kohn in Siberia (1917-1919)undated
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Series VIII: Translations, 1920s

This series is in German.
0.25 linear foot.
Arrangement:

Alphabetical.

Scope and Content:

Series VIII holds a relatively large amount of translations of Hebrew poetry from Gershon Shofman and Saul Tschernichowski. Hugo Knoepfmacher created these translations in collaboration with Hans Kohn during their stay in the prison camp in Siberia.

BoxFolderTitleDate
31Gershon Shofman I1920s?
32Gershon Shofman II1920s?
33Gershon Shofman II1920s?
34Saul Tschernichowski, Gedichte und Gesaenge1920s?
35Unidentified Translations and other Documentsundated
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